Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

March 2009
S M T W T F S
« Feb   Apr »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for March 27th, 2009

Ex-D.C. Mayor Marion Barry Trying to Stay Out of Prison: Says He’ll Pay Some of His Taxes

Ex-D.C. Mayor Marion Barry

Ex-D.C. Mayor Marion Barry

This guy has tangled with the law endless times, often testing his luck. Can he stay out of prison? Federal prosecutors say enough is enough. He should serve some time for his latest shenanigans.  But don’t bet on the mayor running out of luck.

By Hamil R. Harris and Del Quentin Wilber
Washington Post Staff Writers
WASHINGTON — D.C. Council member Marion Barry said yesterday that two-thirds of his $277,000 federal tax debt consists of interest and penalties and that he plans to make a payment on his 2007 D.C. tax bill Monday.

The former mayor said in a telephone interview that he took responsibility for his behavior but that federal prosecutors are being unfair in asking a judge to revoke his probation for tax offenses.

For Full Story

History: J. Edgar Hoover: Part 5 in a Series

FBI Dir. Mueller Presents 42 Honorary Medals

By Allan Lengel
Recipients of the FBI medals

Recipients of the FBI medals

ticklethewire.com
WASHINGTON — Three FBI agents wounded during a 2008 bombing in Pakistan were among  38 FBI and other law enforcement people awarded honorary FBI medals by the director Robert S. Mueller III during a standing- room only ceremony at headquarters Friday.

In all, Mueller presented 42 honorary FBI medals to the 38 people that included the FBI Star, the FBI Medal for Meritorious Achievement, the FBI Shield of Bravery, and the FBI Medal of Valor.

The FBI said the awards recognized “exceptional acts by both FBI and other law enforcement personnel working with the FBI, across the country and around the world.”

“These men and women are not the kind to call attention to their individual acts of heroism, but those brave and courageous acts deserve our attention and our gratitude,” Mueller said. “Today we stand here and formally recognize them with the FBI’s highest honors.”

The three agents in Pakistan who were given awards included Bruce Bennett, Tricia Gibbs and Raymond Pitesky.

Read More Details in Press Release

Ex-Homeland Chief Michael Chertoff Joins Covington & Burling Law Firm in D.C.

Michael Chertoff

Michael Chertoff

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The AmLaw Daily is reporting that ex-Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff has joined the law firm Covington & Burling’s white-collar defense and investigations practice.

The website said Chertoff is senior of counsel in the Washington office. He started earlier this week.

“I’m really looking forward to coming back as a working lawyer, not just as a rainmaker,” Chertoff told AmLaw. “And while it’s been a bit of a transition [this week], I’m happy to be doing real legal work as I genuinely love being a lawyer.”

FBI Promoting Diversity With Interesting Pitch

Elizabeth Morris

Elizabeth Morris

By Al Kamen
Washington Post Columnist
WASHINGTON –The FBI is interested in showing its commitment to diversity. So on its employment Web site, at http://www.fbijobs.gov/421.asp, it touts an “American Indian/Native Alaskan” initiative.

Alas, the bureau is using a picture on that page of a former special agent, Elizabeth Morris, who alleges that she was retaliated against, in part, for filing a complaint of workplace bias. Morris says she was fired in 2007 for filing a complaint against a supervisor for making racially insensitive remarks and for alleging that another agent sent subpoenas to dozens of businesses not under investigation with no intent of reviewing the records.

Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) has asked the Justice Department inspector general to look into that.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Ex-Lobbyist Prime Candidate For Va. U.S. Atty

Neil MacBride/linkedin photo

Neil MacBride/ linkedin photo

President Obama rode into town on an anti-lobby crusade. Will he now appoint a lobbyist for the U.S. Attorney job in Virginia and risk creating controversy?  Then again, the guy is currently employed by the  Justice Department. So how big of a risk is it?

By Jerry Markon and Meg Smith
Washington Post Staff Writers
ALEXANDRIA, Va — A former corporate lobbyist has emerged as a top candidate for U.S. attorney in Alexandria, raising questions about how his appointment would square with the Obama administration’s efforts to change the culture of Washington, according to legal and political sources.

Neil MacBride, 43, lobbied federal officials as recently as mid-2007 on behalf of the Business Software Alliance, which represents Microsoft, IBM and a host of other leading computer companies, U.S. Senate records show. MacBride, a former chief counsel to Vice President Biden, was appointed in January as an associate deputy attorney general.

Justice Department officials and former colleagues described MacBride, who spent four years as a prosecutor, as savvy and highly ethical and said lobbying was a small part of his career. But MacBride would probably have to recuse himself from some cases involving former clients, because the Alexandria prosecutor’s office is one of the nation’s most aggressive in targeting copyright enforcement and cyber security — areas in which he lobbied.

The $149,000-a-year job is among the nation’s most prominent law enforcement posts and has grown increasingly visible in recent years as the U.S. attorney has handled high-profile terrorism and national security cases.

For Full Story