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Archive for June 7th, 2009

The Cuban Spies Among Us

cubaIt’s always mind boggling when someone gets aways with spying for decades. It makes you wonder: Were they really that good or did some people simply miss some hints that something might have been amiss?

By Mary Beth Sheridan and Del Quentin Wilber
Washington Post Staff Writers
WASHINGTON — He was a courtly State Department intelligence analyst from a prominent family who loved to sail and peruse the London Review of Books. Occasionally, he would voice frustration with U.S. policies, but to his liberal neighbors in Northwest D.C. it was nothing out of the ordinary. “We were all appalled by the Bush years,” one said.

What Walter Kendall Myers kept hidden, according to documents unsealed in court Friday, was a deep and long-standing anger toward his country, an anger that allegedly made him willing to spy for Cuba for three decades.

“I have become so bitter these past few months. Watching the evening news is a radicalizing experience,” he wrote in his diary in 1978, referring to what he described as greedy U.S. oil companies, inadequate health care and “the utter complacency of the oppressed” in America. On a trip to Cuba, federal law enforcement officials said in legal filings, Myers found a new inspiration: the communist revolution.

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U.S. Atty. Patrick Fitzgerald on the Attack About a Book that “Defames Me”

Patrick Fitzgerald/file photo

Patrick Fitzgerald/file photo

Talk to prosecutors around the country and you’ll often hear them say Chicago’s U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald is top notch, the gold standard. But Fitzpatrick is obviously worried about protecting that reputation and is going after a book he feels casts him in false light.  It’s an interesting story.

By Michael Isikoff
NEWSWEEK

Patrick Fitzgerald may be the most feared prosecutor in the country, but even as he’s racked up headlines for big-name convictions (Scooter Libby) and indictments (Rod Blagojevich), the hard-charging U.S. attorney from Chicago has been waging a private crusade: trying to kill a book he believes maligns his reputation.

In the past year and a half, Fitzgerald has written four letters to HarperCollins-owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.-demanding it “cease publication” and “withdraw” copies of Triple Cross, a 2006 book by ex-TV newsman Peter Lance that criticizes Fitzgerald’s handling of terror cases in New York in the 1990s.

Fitzgerald raised the temperature even more last week, aiming to halt a paperback version. “To put it plain and simple,” he wrote in a June 2 letter obtained by NEWSWEEK, “if in fact you publish the book this month and it defames me or casts me in a false light, HarperCollins will be sued.”

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