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Archive for June 27th, 2009

First Female Native American U.S. Atty. Diane Humetewa Will Soon Lose Job

U.S. Atty. Diane Humetewa
U.S. Atty. Diane Humetewa

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
WASHINGTON —   The first female Native American to serve as a U.S. Attorney is expected to soon step down, according to Indian Country  Today.

Indian Country Today newspaper reported that U.S. Attorney Diane J. Humetewa of Arizona will step down ” not because she’s doing a bad job, either. Instead, she will become a casualty of the political appointee process that comes with each new presidential administration.”

At the time of her appointment in December 2007 “Indian country found big reason to celebrate”, the publication noted.

The publication said that  many of  the U.S. Attorneys who were fired during the Bush years were “strong in the area of tribal justice”. It said Humetewa helped to fill that void.

Her replacement is expected to be Dennis Burke, a former aide to then Gov Janet Napolitano, who  now heads up the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Movie Review: The Man Who Got J. Edgar Hoover’s Attention: John Dillinger

John Dillinger drove the FBI nuts, robbing banks with a machine gun in tow. Now actor Johnny Depp plays Dillinger in the movie “Public Enemies”. Here’s a trailer and a review below.


By Richard Corliss
Time

To become rich and famous in the depression ’30s, a fellow could make movies, play baseball or rob banks. John Dillinger chose Way 3, and for a while he enjoyed the celebrity of a Clark Gable or a Lou Gehrig.

Newspapers breathlessly limned his exploits as he made sizable withdrawals from vaults throughout the Midwest, using his machine gun as collateral.

But killing cops puts a man at greater risk than hitting a homer or kissing the girl. Dillinger stirred the hunter’s blood in J. Edgar Hoover, the young director of the FBI, and Hoover’s most resourceful agent, Melvin Purvis.

They, and Dillinger too, knew that a life of crime was not a profession from which one gracefully retired. Purvis and his team caught up with their public enemy as he emerged from a theater showing a Gable gangster film. The real-life tough guy was 31 when he died on that Chicago street.

For Full Review