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Archive for September 1st, 2009

U.S. Marshals Arrest Woman Accused in Identity Theft Involving Fed Chairman’s Wife

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

Ill. U.S. Attorney Rodger Heaton Steps Down

Rodger Heaton/doj photo

Rodger Heaton/doj photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

U.S. Attorney Rodger Heaton of Springfield, Ill., who has been a federal prosecutor since 1991, stepped down Monday, the Associated Press reported.

His assistant Jeffrey Lang takes over as the acting U.S. Attorney.

The wire service said Heaton planned to practice law in the private sector.

Heaton had been U.S. Attorney since 2005. Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin has recommended that the post be filled either by attorneys Gregory Harris or James Lewis.

Atty. Gen. Holder Moving to Revive Civil Rights Division

It’s certainly the right move. There’s no reason that this division should have been tamped down during the Bush years.

Atty. Gen. Eric Holder

By CHARLIE SAVAGE
New York Times
WASHINGTON – Seven months after taking office, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. is reshaping the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division by pushing it back into some of the most important areas of American political life, including voting rights, housing, employment, bank lending practices and redistricting after the 2010 census.

As part of this shift, the Obama administration is planning a major revival of high-impact civil rights enforcement against policies, in areas ranging from housing to hiring, where statistics show that minorities fare disproportionately poorly.

President George W. Bush’s appointees had discouraged such tactics, preferring to focus on individual cases in which there is evidence of intentional discrimination.

For Full Service

It’s a Wild Life: Fed Prosecutors Crack Down on Sales of Sea Turtle Eggs and Eagle Feathers

Loggerhead sea turtle/istock photo

Loggerhead sea turtle/istock photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
WASHINGTON — This past week has been an interesting one for federal law enforcement and wildlife.

A West Palm Beach, Fla. man pleaded guilty in federal court to unlawfully possessing 119 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs and a Phoenix man was sentenced to six months home confinement and 150 hours of community service for selling 11 bald eagle tail feathers, authorities said.

The feds apparently take this stuff seriously.

“The buying and selling of feathers of bald eagles, our nation’s symbol, is illegal and those who choose to ignore those laws will be prosecuted,” John C. Cruden, acting Assistant Atty. General for the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division said in a statement after the sentencing Friday.

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Convicted Ex-Rep. William Jefferson Files for Chapt. 7 Bankruptcy

Ironically, this highly educated Harvard Law School grad who pursued the almighty dollar at any cost, has now filed for bankruptcy. It is the latest chapter in a sad tale of a man who had so much going for him.

William J. Jefferson

William J. Jefferson

By Frank Donze
New Orleans Times-Picayune
NEW ORLEANS — Faced with a recent federal court ruling that he can be held liable to forfeit nearly $500,000 in bribe money, convicted former U.S. Rep. William Jefferson and his wife, Andrea, have filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection.

Jefferson, who was found guilty of 11 of 16 counts of corruption last month in a Virginia courtroom, filed paperwork on behalf of himself and his wife last week in U.S. Bankruptcy Court stating that the couple have debt of between $1 million and $10 million.

For Full Story

See Bankruptcy Filing

The Blagojevich Circus is Returning: This Time With a Book

Yes, the Rod Blagojevich circus is coming back to town. Expect to see plenty appearances on tv as he hawks his book. In it, he blames five people for his problems including U.S. Atty. Patrick Fitzgerald.

blago-book

By Stacy St. Clair, Jeff Coen and Rick Pearson
Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO — After myriad television appearances, radio shows and news conferences since his arrest on corruption charges, the seemingly omnipresent former Gov. Rod Blagojevich has made the case for his innocence again, this time in a 259-page memoir that offers small glimpses of both his rocky tenure and his upcoming criminal defense.

In his book “The Governor,” Blagojevich likens his downfall to a Shakespearean tragedy, suggesting his epic demise steals elements from “Othello,” “King Lear” and “Julius Caesar.”

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