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Archive for August 10th, 2010

Opinions Mixed Inside FBI Over Test Cheating Scandal

Robert Mueller/fbi photo

FBI Dir. Robert S. Mueller III/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
For AOL News

WASHINGTON — To cheat or not to cheat on an open-book exam.

That is no longer an issue among FBI agents around the country now that the test is long over. Now the question is, should those who did cheat on the FBI exam last year — and they could number in the hundreds — be punished? Opinions inside the bureau are mixed and plentiful.

“I think someone should get punished,” one FBI agent, who asked not to be identified, told AOL News, adding that the instructions for the test on bureau procedures were clear: You had to take it by yourself. “There are agents who worked hard and took the test on their own. There’s no excuse.”

But others disagree, including one agent who said it was “just goofy” to be accused of cheating on an open-book, multiple-choice exam. Another agent concurred, saying “the whole test is a joke” and that some employees may have found the test-taking instructions confusing and should simply be required to retake the exam if they collaborated with others.

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens Dies in Plane Crash: Final Leg of Life Was Bumpy Including Fed Indictment

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens during his last campaign

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens during his last campaign

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The final leg of ex-Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens’ life was a bumpy one filled with misfortune and fortune.

He was convicted on federal public corruption charges, but fortunately for him,  the case was tossed out for prosecutorial misconduct.  He lost a bid for re-election after 40 years in the Senate. And then on Monday, he was among five people who died in a plane crash in remote Southwest Alaska.

The Anchorage Daily News on Tuesday reported the death, saying three others aboard survived.

Stevens, 86, who was considered a dogged advocate for Alaska, landed in big trouble after federal authorities indicted him in July 2008 on public corruption charges.  On Oct. 27,  days before the election, he was convicted. He went on to lose his bid for re-election.

But fortune returned. Five months later,  the Justice Department moved to dismiss the case on the grounds of prosecutorial misconduct. Simply put: the case was a disaster and an utter embarrassment for the government.

Engineer Guilty of Selling Military Secrets to China

Honolulu_mapBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A former engineer who worked on the B-2 Stealth bomb was convicted in Honolulu Monday of selling military secrets to China to help that nation develop a stealth cruise missile, the Associated Press reported.

Authorities said the engineer, Noshir Gowadia,66, pocketed at least $110,000 from the transactions and used the money to pay the mortgage on a multimillion-dollar ocean-view home on Maui’s north shore, AP reported.

He had been in federal custody since 2005. His lawyers had argued that the materials he gave to China came from unclassified and public information, AP reported.

“Mr. Gowadia provided some of our country’s most sensitive weapons-related designs to the Chinese government for money,” U.S. Attorney David Kris said in a statement.

“Today, he is being held accountable for his actions. This prosecution should serve as a warning to others who would compromise our nation’s military secrets for profit.”

Drug Cartels Operate Freely in Small Calif. Towns

In these small little towns in California, not only are some of the politicians extremely corrupt, but they’ve become places where gangs and Mexican and Colombian drug cartels operate freely.  Investigative reporter Jeffrey Anderson examines the problem.
CALIFornia map
By Jeffrey Anderson
Washington Times

BELL, Calif. —  The gang graffiti that coats freeway overpasses, exit signs and the concrete banks of the Los Angeles River attests to a problem more alarming than the recent revelations of hundreds of thousands of dollars in annual salaries for public officials.

Street gangs, a powerful prison gang known as the Mexican Mafia and even more powerful drug-trafficking organizations based in Mexico and Colombia operate freely in this small city and the similarly sized cities surrounding it.

News reports in recent weeks have focused on three Bell city officials who resigned on July 26 amid revelations that they were being paid up to $800,000 per year in a city of 36,000 where the average annual household income is less than $40,000. California Attorney General Jerry Brown on Monday announced that he issued subpoenas to current and former members of Bell’s city government, adding that his office also is investigating allegations of “possible illegal election conduct by Bell officials.”

To read full story click here.