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Archive for March 14th, 2011

Lewis “Matt” Chapman to Head Mobile, Ala. FBI Office

Lewis M. Chapman/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Lewis “Matt” Chapman is taking charge  of the FBI’s Mobile, Ala. office, the FBI announced Monday.

Chapman’s last stop was as  FBI  section chief of the Investigative and Operations Support Section, Critical Incident Response Group in Quantico, Va.

The FBI said Chapman, as section chief, oversaw the FBI’s National Center for Analysis of Violent Crime, crisis management, special events, and rapid deployment logistics programs. He also served as the FBI on-scene commander at the Beijing Olympics.

He entered the FBI in 1988, first working in the Dallas division on violent crime, fugitives, public corruption and government fraud matters.

In 1999, he was bumped up to supervisory special agent at FBI Headquarters in the Counterterrorism Division, Weapons of Mass Destruction Operations Unit. At headquarters, he also served as an assistant inspector i the Inspection Division.

In 2002, he moved to the the Memphis Division as a supervisor of the Joint Terrorism Task Force and oversaw all foreign counterintelligence matters.

He then went off to the New Orleans office, where he served as an assistant special agent in charge from 2004 to 2008.

Deputy U.S. Marshals Increasingly Being Put in Harms Way


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Marshals Service has becoming increasingly involved in apprehending local and federal officials, which may explain in part why its deputies are increasingly being put in harms way, the website Talking Points Memo suggests.

In the past several weeks, two deputy U.S. marshals have been shot and killed during confrontations with wanted felons.

“The USMS has seven Fugitive Apprehension Task Forces around the country and another 75 Violent Offender Task Forces run by various regional USMS offices,” Ryan Reilly of Talking Points Memo reports.

“And the volume of state and local fugitives apprehended or cleared by the Marshals Service through a decade-old initiative has surged from just 15,412 in 2004 to 34,015 in 2007 and 73,915 in 2008. The number peaked at 101,910 in 2009 (likely due to apprehension and Fugitive Safe Surrender programs funded by stimulus funds) then dropped in 2010, when the agency captured or cleared 52,519 violent state and local felony fugitives. The USMS is planning to apprehend or clear 52,000 state and local felony fugitives in 2012.”

The website reported that up until a few weeks ago, the last deputy U.S. Marshal killed  in the line of duty was at Ruby Ridge in 1992.

Last week, deputy U.S. Marshal John Perry in St. Louis was shot and killed while trying to arrest someone. And last month, deputy U.S. Marshal Derek Hotsinpiller was killed in West Virginia.

Two Ex-Blackwater Workers Convicted in Fed Court in Fatal Shooting in Afghanistan


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Two former Blackwater employees have been convicted in federal court in of involuntary manslaughter while working Afghanistan in 2009.

Justin Cannon, 27, of Corpus Christi, Tex. and Christopher Drotleff, 29, of Virginia Beach, Va., were convicted Friday in Norfolk U.S. District Court. Both were working for Blackwater as contractors for the U.S. Department of Defense in Afghanistan. They were acquitted of other charges including second-degree murder.

The Justice Department said evidence at trial showed Cannon and Drotleff left their military base without authorization and joined a convoy transporting local interpreters.

Following a traffic accident involving one of the vehicles in the convoy, Cannon and Drotleff fired multiple shots into the back of a civilian car that tried to pass the accident scene, the Justice Department said.

The passenger of the car was fatally shot, the driver was seriously injured and a man walking his dog was also killed.

Washington Post Reporter Writes Book on Shooting of Pres. Reagan

By JANET MASLIN
New York Times

The patient was 70, fit and very polite. He made it a point of pride to walk into the emergency room under his own steam. The medical staff went to work on him immediately, cutting off clothes, inserting IV lines, starting fluids and hooking up monitors. The process moved so fast that one worker never bothered to look at his face. Another asked for an address and was surprised by the answer: 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

It has been nearly 30 years since President Ronald Reagan was shot outside the Washington Hilton Hotel on March 30, 1981. The attack is well remembered, but the details are not. One reason for the memory lapse, according to Del Quentin Wilber, the author of “Rawhide Down,” a newly revealing account of this potentially deadly attack, is that Reagan survived it so smoothly.

Twelve days after being fired upon, he was back at the White House looking sensational. He ultimately enhanced his popularity by rebounding with such courage, resilience and even good cheer.

Mr. Wilber, a Washington Post reporter covering law-enforcement and security issues, had no great interest in dredging up the details of this crisis. But in 2008 he covered a hearing for John W. Hinckley Jr., the blank-faced shooter who had been found not guilty by reason of insanity in 1982. (Mr. Hinckley remains largely confined to a psychiatric hospital.)

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