Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

July 2013
S M T W T F S
« Jun   Aug »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for July 22nd, 2013

Appeals Court Rules NY Times Reporter James Risen Must Testify: He Says He’d Rather Go to Jail

Reporter James Risen

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
WASHINGTON — James Risen, a hard-hitting New York Times reporter, continues to have his feet held to the fire.

A U.S. Appeals Court in Richmond, Va. on Friday ruled that the reporter and author must testify in a criminal trial of a former CIA officer accused of providing classified information to Risen about a botched plot against the Iranian government, USA Today reports.

The court ruled that  the First Amendment did not protect reporters in cases of unauthorized leaks from testifying against the suspected leakers.

Risen has vowed to appeal the ruling to Supreme Court and go to jail if necessary.

The ruling comes in wake of a controversial move by the Justice Department to secretly obtain Associated Press reporters’ phone records, and a vow by the Justice Department to be more sensitive to the work reporters do.

“The subpoena for Risen’s testimony was not issued in bad faith or for the purpose of harassment,” the court’s majority concluded. “Risen is not being called upon to give information bearing only a remote and tenuous relationship to the subject of the investigation, and there is no reason to believe that his testimony implicates confidential source relationship without a legitimate need of law enforcement.”

The latest ruling has triggered much talk among journalists here in the nation’s capital.

The New York Times writes:

Mr. Risen is a national security reporter for The Times, but the case revolves around material he published in his 2006 book, “State of War,” not in the newspaper. A chapter in the book recounted efforts by the C.I.A. in the Clinton administration to trick Iranian scientists by having a Russian defector give them blueprints for a nuclear triggering device that had been altered with an error. The chapter portrays the operation as reckless and botched in a way that could have helped the Iranians gain accurate information.

Head of Milwaukee FBI Office Is Reassigned After Refusing to Testify in Court

Teresa Carlson/fbi photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Teresa Carlson, special agent in charge of the Milwaukee FBI office, was quietly reassigned to the agency’s headquarters after she refused to testify in a federal courtroom in Virginia, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports.

Carlson is accused of trying to influence a subordinate’s testimony on whether the FBI refused to give an Army veteran a job because of his disabilities.

The Office of Inspector General is investigating what could become a criminal case, the Journal Sentinel reported.

Carlson is accused of telling an agent “to come down on the side of the government in this matter,” according to court records in the case.

Homeland Security Inspector General Is Accused of Mismanagement, Nepotism

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The acting inspector general of Homeland Security is accused of mismanagement and nepotism, the New York Post reports.

Documents obtained by the Post show that Charles Edwards took at least four jaunts on the taxpayers’ dime and employed his wife.

Never mind that Edwards’ job is to protect the agency from violating rules and laws.

At least four of the trips involved travels to Miami and Ft. Lauderdale, where Edwards was attending a computer information-sciences degree at Nova Southeastern University, according to the Post.

“If those allegations turn out to be true, then this deputy inspector general is violating his role as a public servant who is being paid on the taxpayer dime,” said Mary Beth Hutchins, of the group Cause of Action.

Congress to Consider Restricting NSA’s Domestic Surveillance Programs

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The growing controversy over NSA’s domestic surveillance programs is likely to spark legislative debates that could change the extent to which feds can snoop on Americans, McClatchy Newspapers reports.

Elected officials have been growing increasingly concerned about the NSA since Edward Swowden leaked information about the surveillance last month.

“People at the NSA in particular have heard a constant public drumbeat about a laundry list of nefarious things they are alleged to be doing to spy on Americans — all of them wrong,” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, a Michigan Republican, said last month. “The misperceptions have been great, yet they keep their heads down and keep working every day to keep us safe.”

Members of Congress said they are getting inpatient, McClatchy Newspapers wrote.

“I think the administration and the NSA has had six weeks to answer questions and haven’t done a good job at it,” said Rep. Rick Larsen, a Washington Democrat.

FBI to Review More than 2,000 Cases That Involved Hair Sample Evidence

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Hair samples are one popular way to obtain DNA evidence.

But the FBI plans to examine more than 2,000 cases in which hair samples led to a conviction, McClatchy Newspapers reports.

The FBI plans to examine more than 2,000 cases from 1985 to 2000. Some of those cases include people awaiting execution and others who already died in prison.

The idea is to determine whether conclusions were hastily reached about a case based on hair samples, McClatchy Newspapers wrote.

“This will be critical to giving wrongfully convicted people a fair chance at a fair review,” said Steven D. Benjamin, president of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.

Column: New School Dedicated to the Late DEA Agent Enrique Camarena, Who Lived a Life of Bravery

Photo of the news school

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office.
 
By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

The opening next week of the Enrique S. Camarena Elementary School in Chula Vista, California celebrates the legacy of a courageous DEA agent who was murdered by Mexican drug cartel members in February 1985.

No doubt Special Agent Camarena’s family, especially his son Enrique S. Camarena, Jr., will pause this week, particularly because the school opening coincides with their father’s birthday, and remember what a special father and husband he was.

The rest of us can remember him for his sacrifice and commitment to contributing to a safer world.Like Special Agent Terry Watson, whose life and recent death were the subject of a column a couple weeks ago. Enrique “Kiki” Camarena lived a full life of bravery and service. He was born in Mexicali, Mexico, but his family moved to the United States in Calexico, California.

He became a naturalized U. S. citizen and served in the Marines, as a firefighter and police investigator before joining DEA.

Assigned to the Guadalajara office in 1981, he was fearless in pursuing the illegal activities of the drug smugglers in the area. Despite the danger he acted undercover and had infiltrated the cartel. In 1985, his investigation led to the discovery and destruction of 2,500 acres of marijuana worth an estimated $ 9 billion.In spite of information, that he had been targeted by the cartel, he stayed on to continue his investigations.

On February 7, 1985, in broad daylight, he was kidnapped as he left the U.S. Consulate in Guadalajara. He was on his way to meet his wife Geneva for lunch. For two days he was tortured and then bludgeoned to death by cartel henchmen with the aid of corrupt police officers.

A massive manhunt by U.S. federal law enforcement resulted in the capture and conviction of his killers and their aider and abettors. Special Agent Camarena’s life continues to make a difference. The activities of the Camarena Foundation support education and drug-free living for America’s youth.

Every year in October thousands of schools and law enforcement offices around the country participate in Red Ribbon Week to support the goals of the Foundation.Enrique Camarena Jr. was 11 when his father died, but he made a commitment to follow in his father’s footsteps. With the support of the DEA Survivors Benefit Fund he went to law school and became a Deputy District Attorney for San Diego County, where he continues to serve.

He is also active in the work of the Camarena Foundation and in contributing to the efforts to support other children who have lost a father or mother who were killed in the line of duty. The new school bearing Agent Camarena’s name will employ innovative teaching methods and the latest technology to provide a quality education to its 975 students.As they stream into their beautiful new school, boisterous with excitement, Kiki Camarena will be somewhere watching, no doubt proud and happy for the promise that they hold for America’s future.

Toxicology Reports May Shed Light on What Killed Former ‘Whitey’ Bulger Witness

 

Updated Bulger photo/wbur

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Officials have not yet determined the cause of death of an alleged extortion victim of James “Whitey” Bulger who was found dead a day after learning he wouldn’t be testifying in the racketeering and murder trial of the suspected mob boss, The Boston Herald reports

An autopsy of Stephen M. “Stippo” Rakes provided inconclusive evidence, and officials are awaiting the toxicology reports. 

In the meantime, Rakes will be mourned Wednesday at the William F. Spencer Funeral Home on East Broadway in South Boston, the Herald reported.

Rakes was 59 and left behind three children and two grandchildren.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST