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Archive for September, 2013

Former Head of Boston’s FBI Office to Plead Guilty to Ethics Charge

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The former head of the FBI’s Boston office won’t serve any time in jail under a proposed deal with prosecutors that would require him to plead guilty, the Associated Press reports.

Kenneth Kaiser is expected to pleaded guilty to an ethics charge in return for a maximum punishment of a $15,000 fine.

The 57-year-old is accused of violating a federal ethics law by meeting with former FBI colleagues about his company that was under investigation, the AP wrote.

Kaiser served as special agent in charge of the office from 2003 to 2006 before leaving to become an assistant director at FBI headquarters.

FBI Says It’s Out As Leader of 1982 Tylenol Killings Investigation

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The long-unsolved Tylenol killings will no longer be led by the FBI, a disappointment for those holding out for a justice, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The news comes near the 31st anniversary of the seven deaths of Chicago residents who ingested cyanide-laced Tylenol capsules in 1982.

The discovery of cyanide sent a shock wave across the country, leading to reforms in packaging for over-the-counter drugs.

The investigation is now under the leadership of the Arlington Heights Police Department.

“We’re still working the case,”  Cmdr. Mike Hernandez told the Tribune.

 

Longtime Border Patrol Agent Known for His Skill at ‘the Game’ Dies

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

During the three decades that he spent with Border Patrol, Ab Taylor became somewhat of a legend.

The plain-spoken Texan was known for his incredible man-tracking ability.

On Sept. 9, Taylor died at the age 88, The Washington Post reports. The cause was Alzheimer’s disease.

Taylor made a name for himself by developing an expertise for spotting evidence to hunt down people –  a pattern of dust, out-of-place rocks, a broken twig.

He referred to the daily hunt as “the Game.”

At one point, Taylor expressed compassion for the people he was hunting down.

“I can have the greatest empathy for the individual Mexican coming in and understand him and know about him,” Mr. Taylor told the Los Angeles Times in 1972. “Still, I don’t have reservations about doing my job because I know that this country cannot possibly absorb all the poverty of Mexico.”

 

Columnist: A Little Sense Would Go Long Way for Immigration Issue

By Esther Cepeda
Anchorage Daily News

With the on-again, off-again chances of achieving wide-ranging immigration reform, there’s much to be exasperated about. But more frustrating are the smaller, slam-dunk situations that could be settled by other means.

Take the case of Sergio Garcia, who has a law degree and passed the bar exam in California but cannot practice because he is an unlawful immigrant. The state of California is pushing the envelope with a piece of controversial legislation that would allow Garcia to ply his trade even though he’s residing in the U.S. illegally.

A logic-defying law that would allow such immigrants to be admitted to the California Bar is sitting on Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk doing a few things: awaiting the governor’s signature, again challenging the federal government’s supremacy over the states on immigration issues, and antagonizing those who are already against any reform that includes a path to citizenship because it seems to reward those who have broken the law.

What’s needed in this case is not a divisive and ridiculous state-based loophole but a bare minimum of common sense.

Former Army Snipers Arrested in Alleged Plan to Assassinate DEA Agent

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Two former U.S. Army snipers and a retired sharpshooter planned to assassinate a DEA agent and an informant in Africa, the Justice Department announced, reports the USA Today.

The murders-for-hire were part of a bold plan to fly hundreds of kilograms of cocaine from Colombia to the U.S., the federal government alleges.

The snipers were charged Friday.

The Colombian “drug traffickers” were acting as confidential sources for the DEA, the USA Today reported.

Two other experienced snipers, one from Poland and the other from Germany, were arrested for allegedly being involved in the original plot, the USA Today wrote.

The “bone-chilling allegations read like they were ripped from the pages of a Tom Clancy novel,” U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement announcing the indictment.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Ex-soldiers Plotted to kill DEA Agent, Traffic Cocaine

By Selim Algar
New York Post

They’re real-life Rambos gone bad.

A squadron of former elite military personnel from the US and Germany plotted to assassinate a DEA agent and an informant — both undercover agents – who were interfering with a cocaine distribution ring, according to a Manhattan federal court indictment released Friday.

Led by former US Army Sgt. Joseph “Rambo” Hunter, the international crew of veteran snipers and ex-counter-intelligence officers formed a security detail and hit squad for a supposed crew of heavyweight Colombian drug smugglers, who were working with authorities, the feds said.

In meetings held from Asia to Africa, the fearsome unit was caught on surveillance casually discussing killing the DEA agent and informant and similar executions they had coldly committed in the past.

To read the full story click here.

DEA Warns About Dangerous Ecstasy Drug Known as “Molly”

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The head of the DEA in Atlanta is warning the public about the dangers of a powerful designer ecstasy  drug that goes by the names “MOLLY’ or “Meow Meow” and “Drone.”

Harry S. Sommers, special agent in charge of the Atlanta office, is warning that the pure, high quality powder form of the popular designer drug ecstasy has been well-documented to be adulterated and formed into a number of dangerous and potentially deadly analogues.

A press release out of Atlanta states:

 On June 30, 2013, one person died and 125 were hospitalized after ingesting a drug called “Molly” while attending the Central Washington State Music Festival. At a bar in Boston, on August 28, 2013, three people overdosed, and one person died from a drug overdose from what authorities believe may have been “Molly.” And on September 2, 2013, two people died and four more were hospitalized in New York City at a concert after apparently taking a drug marketed as “Molly.” Toxicology reports will provide a better understanding of the causes of these deaths.

 

Weekend Series on Crime History: The Westies in New York