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Archive for May 27th, 2014

Celebrity Hacker Helped Prevent More Than 300 Cyber Attacks As Informant

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has used celebrity hacker “Sabu” to imprison his friends and prevent prevent more than 300 cyber attacks against the U.S. military, NASA and media companies in the past three years, CNN reports.

Hector Monsegur, who used the Sabu moniker online, helped crack down on hacking collectives Anonymous and LulzSec.

In exchange for his help, the government is seeking leniency. Monsegur previously faced up to 26 years in prison for identity theft and credit card fraud.

“Working sometimes literally around the clock, at the direction of law enforcement, Monsegur engaged his co-conspirators in online chats that were critical to confirming their identities and whereabouts,” prosecutors said. “During some of the online chats, at the direction of law enforcement, Monsegur convinced LulzSec members to provide him digital evidence of the hacking activities they claimed to have previously engaged in, such as logs regarding particular criminal hacks.”

FBI Agent Who Cracked Down on Public Corruption to Join North Carolina Board of Elections

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI Agent Charles W. Stuber Jr. knows a thing or two about public corruption, from going after U.S. Sen. John Edwards to helping secure convictions against a range of state political figures.

Now the 54-year-old, who has worked for the FBI since 1985, is retiring this month and will take his investigative prowess to the North Carolina Board of Elections, where he’ll probe campaign and elections violations, the Charlotte Observer reports.

Stuber expects to begin work for the state’s elections agency in June.

Border Patrol Shifts Resources Because of Sharp Increase of Immigrant Smugglers in Texas

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The never-ending battle to crack down on immigrant smugglers has shifted to southernmost Texas where federal agents are seeing an alarming influx of activity, Fox News reports.

Border Patrol leaders are shifting resources from western states after a marked increase of arrests from Oct. 1 to May 17, when more than 148,000 people were arrested. At that pace, the arrests would reach the last year’s number in just eight months.

“I don’t think we have anywhere near the resources that we would require to even make a dent in what we’ve got going on here,” said Chris Cabrera, a Border Patrol agent in McAllen and local vice president of the agents’ union. “I think it’s common knowledge that we don’t have the resources, that’s why they’re coming in droves like they are. They’re exploiting a weakness that they’ve found and quite frankly they’re doing a good job of it.”

Justice Department Wants to Slow Pace of Deportations by Focusing on Immigrants with Violent Histories

Jeh Johnson

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

City and county jails are increasingly rejecting federal requests to hold immigrants who are in the country illegally.

Now the Justice Department plans to do something about it – reduce deportation mainly to immigrants who have committed violent crimes, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is expected to make his case before the Security Communities.

The move is controversial because it would reduce the number of deportations.

Supporters say the initiative would allow local police to handle their own crimes and for more humane treatment of immigrants.

Republicans oppose any changes to Secure Communities without an overhaul of the immigration law, the Los Angeles Times wrote.

Discontinued Full-Body Scanners at Airports End Up in Local Jails After Privacy Concerns

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The full-body scanners that revealed nude images to the TSA at airports now have a new home.

Time reports that most of the 171 scanners have ended up in jails nationwide.

Privacy advocates blasted the scanners, saying they were too revealing.

The federal government let go of the scanners for much less than they were paid for – $130,000 to $170,00.

 

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