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Archive for July 24th, 2014

CBP Is Hiring 2,000 New Agents Because of New 2014 Spending Plan

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

CBP plans to hire 2,000 new agents thanks to funding provided in the 2014 budget, KTAR reports.

The hiring of agents to secure the air, land and sea ports has nothing to do with the current immigration crisis involving unaccompanied Central American children, officials said. “This was in the pipeline,” said CBP spokeswoman Theresa Small. “It has nothing to do with the influx of Central American children.”

The plan is to fill the positions by the end of fiscal year 2014 to “enhance security, help reduce wait times and facilitate growing volumes of legitimate goods and travelers that are critical to the health of our nation’s economy,” the CBP said in a press released.

For more information on the positions, visit www.cbp.gov/careers.

Homeland Security Director: Cash for Border Protection About to Dry Up

Jeh Johnson

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Funding to combat illegal immigration may be gone in less than a month, warned Homeland Security Director Jeh Johnson.

Johnson is urging lawmakers to approve an emergency spending bill.

At the current rate, Johnson said funds for the U.S. Immigration Customs would dry up in the mid-August. Cash for Border Protection would be gone by mid-September.

Authorities are hoping the U.S. House can reach a compromise on the bill before the month-long August recess.

President Obama is asking for $3.7 billion in emergency spending.

New Jersey Police Captain Accused of Using FBI Database to Vet Baseball Teammates

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A judge convicted a suspended New Jersey police captain of using an FBI database to check to do  backgrounds of players on a minor league baseball that he followed, Philly.com reports.

Brian Brady, 52, of Sparta, also directed subordinates to use the National Crime Information Center database to conduct a background check on a home health aid for his mom. He was the third ranking officer of the state Human Services Police.

Brady was found guilty of official misconduct and computer theft.

Brady “repeatedly treated a restricted law enforcement database like his personal information clearinghouse,” said Criminal Justice Division Director Elie Honig.

“There’s no room in law enforcement for this type of rogue behavior,” Honig said.

Brady faces up to 20 years in prison.

ATF Handles Far Fewer Cases Because of Policy Change Under President Obama

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The number of ATF cases recommended for prosecution dropped by a third since 2004, according to data compiled by Syracuse University, the Washington Times reports.

Federal investigators and gun law experts said the decline is attributed to a policy change in the Obama administration, which has changed its focus to regulatory-type cases.

“Within the later part of the Bush years, case selections within the ATF have gone from mostly violent crime cases – which is their forte – toward the regulatory, where they look at dealers, manufacturers and trafficking cases – and they take a lot more time to develop,” said Robert Sanders, a former ATF assistant director. “The agencies philosophy has shifted to guns are the problem, and access to guns are the problem, rather than the criminal being the direct indicator of crime.”

Under Obama, the agency merged its regulatory division with law enforcement.

The result was the loss of law-enforcement and an increased focus on regulation, the Washington Times wrote.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Seattle’s New FBI Chief Described ‘Momentum’ In 13-Year-old Murder of Prosecutor

Frank Montoya Jr.

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The new head of the Seattle FBI office is wiping off the dust of a 13-year-old investigation into the fatal shooting of a Seattle federal prosecutor after expressing “momentum” in the case, the Seattle Times reports.

“It’s an ongoing, active investigation,” Special Agent in Charge Frank Montoya Jr. said during a wide-ranging news briefing. The news comes after the previous special agent in charge, Laura Laughlin, reportedly reduced the size of the task force working the case of Thomas Wales.

Montoya said he’s encouraged with the prospect of solving the case, which involves active leads.

Wales was shot in his basement through a window in the backyard.

A witness said a man fled.