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Archive for October 3rd, 2014

Weekend Series on Crime: The Real Sopranos

FBI Offers $5,000 Reward in Search for High-Powered Guns Stolen from Agent’s Car

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the recovery of two high-powered weapons and body armor from an FBI agent’s car in North Carolina, WSOCTV.com reports.

The shotgun and rifle were stolen from the agent’s car sometime between midnight and 8 a.m. Monday in the Hunter Oaks neighborhood.

The agent was permitted to keep his weapons in his car because he is part of a special response team that must be ready to respond around-the-clock.

It’s still unclear how the vehicle was broken into.

“No windows were broken,” said John Strong, who is the special agent in charge of the Charlotte Division. “The weapons were in individual canvas bags and locked in the trunk, as required by policy.”

 

Why Would Someone Ambush, Shoot 2 Pennsylvania State Troopers? Special Agent Offers Insight

Eric Frein

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It’s still anyone’s guess why someone would ambush two Pennsylvania state troopers and then shoot them with a high-caliber rifle on Sept. 12.

One special agent with the FBI offered some insight into the suspect – 31-year-old Eric Matthew Frein.

Frein lived with his parents and likely was unsatisfied with life, said Ed Hanko, special agent in charge of the Philadelphia Division of the FBI. He played in military re-enactments and may have wanted to fulfill one of those roles.

“We want to arrest this person,”  Hanko said, adding later, “We have the who, the what, the where. We want the why.”

After the attack, Frein took cover in the woods and has been missing since.

Next Secret Service Director Will Face Herculean Task to Raise Morale, Improve Protection

Secret Service photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Whoever takes over the embattled Secret Service will face an insurmountable task.

They must handle plunging morale, a tarnished reputation, budget holes and plenty of blunders that led to the resignation of Director Julia Pierson, the Wall Street Journal reports.

How disgruntled are employees? A 2013 survey found that Secret Service agents had the lowest employee job satisfaction in a decade.

And now there are elected officials who want to change how the Secret Service operates.

“Long term, we must consider restructuring the Secret Service’s mission,” said Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican who has emerged as one of the agency’s most vocal critics in recent days.

From 2010 to 2014, the number of people who protect the president and others fell from 3,800 to 3,533.

Now Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is considering appointing an outsider to operate the Secret Service.

The problems are numerous, said Jon Adler, the president of Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association, a group whose members include Secret Service agents.

“You don’t have the current training, you have an overworked, tired overextended workforce and it’s going to factor into response time,” he said. “If the agency is properly funded, properly staffed and properly trained, those things in conjunction with the right protocols, then the system works,” he added.

Lawsuit: TSA Responsible for Spilled Urn That Contained Remains of Man’s Mother

tsa.gov

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Cleveland man was on his way to Puerto Rico to spread his mother’s cremated remains in the Caribbean Sea.

But when Shannon Thomas opened his bag, he discovered that his mom’s ashes had spilled all over the suitcase with a TSA inspection notice, the Cleveland Scene reports.

In a lawsuit against the TSA, Thomas said his bag was packed with a “very heavy and steady” urn that was tightly screwed.

He argues the TSA “”negligently, carelessly, and recklessly replaced the lid of the urn, placed a bag inspection notice in Plaintiff’s suitcase and sent the bag on its way. This action caused the urn to open and spilled the remains of Plaintiff’s mother on the inside of Plaintiff’s suitcase and on Plaintiff’s personal effects.”

Thomas said he can’t understand why the agency hasn’t even issued an apology.

“No person speaking on behalf of the United States or TSA has ever issued an apology, explanation, or notification to [Thomas] aside from the bag search notice.”

Other Stories of Interest