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Archive for February 16th, 2015

Wrongfully Convicted Man Sues FBI Agents Who Helped Send Him to Prison

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A computer programmer who was wrongfully convicted of stealing trading codes from Goldman Sachs Group Inc. in 2009 is suing the FBI agents who helped put him in prison, Bloomberg reports.

Sergey Aleynikov, who inspired Michael Lewis’s best-seller “Flash Boys,” claims in the lawsuit that agents violated his constitutional against unreasonable search and seizure and arrested him without probable cause.

The lawsuit alleges that Goldman Sachs waged its “enormous influence” to prompt the FBI investigation and subsequent arrest.

Federal jurors convicted the naturalized U.S. citizen of economic espionage and other crimes in 2010.

Percentage of Black FBI Agents Declined Over Past Two Decades

FBI Director James Comey

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

While FBI Director James Comey offered a sobering critique of law enforcement’s handling of African Americans, his agency isn’t exactly a beacon of diversity.

Politico reports that the percentage of black FBI agents has declined over the past two decades.

African Americans only represent 4.7% of the FBI’s special agents, a drop from 5.6% in 1997.

The bureau was hit with high-profile discrimination lawsuits that prompted the FBI to admit racial discrimination in the 1980s and 1990s.

Although Comey didn’t mention FBI personnel during his speech at

Georgetown University, but he did address the recruitment of minority agents during a question-and-answer session.

“It is an imperative for all of us in law enforcement to try to reflect the communities we serve,” Comey said. “Big challenge for the FBI — the FBI is overwhelmingly white and male among my agent force. … I have to change the numbers.”

Former FBI Agent Who Became VP of New York Yankees Dies

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Phil McNiff, a former FBI agent and executive vice president of the New York Yankees, died Sunday, The Tampa Tribune reports. 

McNiff died following “a long, difficult battle with an illness that sapped his memory and his remarkable spirit of caring for people.”

McNiff, whose older brother also worked for the FBI, graduated from George Washington University and served in the Navy before joining the bureau.

After retiring from the FBI in 1980, McNiff became executive vice president of the Yankees.

House Speaker Boehner ‘Certainly’ Prepared to Let Homeland Security Shut Down

John A. Boehner By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

House Speaker John A. Boehner said he’s “certainly” willing to let Homeland Security shut down at the end of the month.

The New York Times reports that Boehner said he won’t budge on a spending bill that would remove funding for President Obama’s immigration policy.

“The House has done its job; we’ve spoken,” Mr. Boehner said on “Fox News Sunday.” “If the Senate doesn’t like it, they’ll have to produce something that fits their institution.”

The House passed the Homeland Security bill last month, but it “stands no chance of becoming law.”

“Senate Democrats have filibustered it; Mr. Obama has said he would veto it; and even some Senate Republicans, including John McCain of Arizona, have questioned the wisdom of the House’s unyielding position, raising doubts that the bill would get even 51 Republican votes in the Senate.”

Army Sniper Pleads Guilty to Conspiring to Murder DEA Agent, Informant

Sniper rifle

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A former U.S. Army sniper has pleaded guilty to conspiring to murder a DEA agent and an informant.

Joseph Hunter, 49, and five others were arrested in September 2013 after they were recorded plotting to kill a DEA agent and informant in Liberia for $800,000, International Business Times reports.

Hunter was snared in a sting operation in which he thought he was working for a Columbian drug cartel.

Hunter faces between 10 years and life in prison when he is sentenced in May.

He also pleaded guilty to firearms charges and conspiring to import cocaine into the U.S.

Other Stories of Interest