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Archive for May 27th, 2015

Investigators: American Accused of Trying to Join ISIS Threatened to Kill FBI Agents

Mohamed Abdihamid Farah

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Minnesota man arrested for allegedly trying to travel to Syria to join ISIS told an informant that he’d kill FBI agents if he felt threatened, CBS reports. 

Mohamed Abdihamid Farah, 21, was among six Minnesota men arrested last month on charges of conspiring to provide material support to foreign terrorists.

According to authorities, Farah even discussed tweeting FBI agents upon arrival in Syria. In a recorded conversation, he said he would kill FBI agents “if our backs are against the wall.”

Daud’s attorney, Bruce Nestor, said the allegations are nonsense because his client never intended to commit any of the crimes.

“Many of the alleged statements are simply youthful boasting which, like the so-called conspiracy, were encouraged and facilitated by a government informant who himself tried to join ISIS and repeatedly had lied to the government,” Nestor said.

 Other Stories of Interest


FBI Agent Shot Trying to Rescue 9-Year-Old from Kidnapper

Jessie Williams, 24

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An FBI agent was shot and wounded while trying to rescue a 9-year-old girl from a kidnapper in a Louisiana hotel Tuesday, the Associated Press reports. 

The agent was struck in the leg and will survive. The 24-year-old kidnapping suspect, however, died after a member of the FBI task force shot him.

An investigation into the kidnapping of the Texas girl led authorities to a Days Inn near Shrevoport, La.

“They encountered the suspect and a struggle ensued. During the struggle, an FBI agent was shot,” a brief FBI statement said.

The suspect was identified as Jessie Williams.

Judge: FBI Had No Right to Pose As Internet Repairmen to Get Evidence

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI agents crossed the line when they posed as Internet repairmen to get access to computers in a Las Vegas Strip hotel last summer during an investigation into online gambling, a federal judge has ruled.

U.S. District Judge Andrew Gordon in Las Vegas dismissed the evidence collected during the sting, leaving federal prosecutors with a potentially dead investigation, the Associated Press reports. 

The evidence won’t convict Malaysian businessman Wei Seng “Paul” Phua, defense attorneys David Chesnoff and Thomas Goldstein said.

“There’s no more evidence from anywhere,” said Chesnoff, who has alleged investigative and prosecutorial misconduct and cast the case as a fight for people in their homes to be free from prying eyes of the government.

U.S. attorneys declined to comment.

It’s not yet whether the case will survive without the evidence .

FBI Director Comey Tells Police How to Join Dialogue about Race

Director James B. Comey

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director James Comey met privately with Connecticut police chiefs Tuesday and encouraged them to become a part of the dialogue about policing and race, the Associated Press reports.

Comey described the discussion as productive but declined to discuss specifics.

“As you would expect in the Nutmeg State, it was a thoughtful and rich conversation,” said Comey, who still considers Connecticut home after working in the past for Westport-based Bridgewater Associates.

It was Comey’s second visit to the New Haven field office since taking the helm nearly two years ago.

Comey said he is trying to make the FBI more diverse but the bureau has struggled to get  enough applicants.

“We’re in a good place in Connecticut,” Comey said. “It was mostly a positive discussion about how they perceive law enforcement relationships to have improved particularly under the leadership I now have and have had for two years here in Connecticut, and that’s a good thing.”

 

Lawsuit: Does U.S. Constitution Protect Mexicans in Their Home Country?

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Is a Mexican boy shot in his home country protected by the U.S. Constitution?

The question is at the center of a lawsuit filed by the family of a Mexican teenager who was shot and killed by a Border Patrol agent near Nogales, Sonora, in 2012, the Associated Press reports.   

The 16-year-old’s mother said her boy was just walking home near the border fence when an agent shot him. Border Patrol counters that the boy was among a group throwing rocks at agents.

The attorney for the agent who fired the fatal shots argued Tuesday that the lawsuit has no merit because the boy wasn’t protect by the Constitution.

The FBI is investigation the shooting.