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Archive for July 20th, 2015

FBI Investigating Whether Gunman in Tennessee Had Ties with ISIS

Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez

Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is trying to determine whether Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez, the 24-year-old who killed four Marines and a Navy petty office in Tennessee on Thursday, was involved with ISIS, USA Today reports.

Agents are examining Abdulazeez’s cellphone and computer and investigating his recent trip to Jordan following the shooting.

Family of Abdulazeez, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Kuwait, said he was depressed “for many years.”

Before the shooting, Abdulazeez reportedly texted an Islamic verse to a friend.

“Whosoever shows enmity to a friend of Mine, then I have declared war against him,” the text read.

Homeland Security Committee Chairman: Chattanooga Attack Prove Attacks ‘Can Happen Anywhere’

Rep. Michael McCaul

Rep. Michael McCaul

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The shooting that left five military members dead in Chattanooga last week should serve as a chilling reminder to Americans, U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, said Sunday, the Chattanooga Times Free Press reports.

“If it can happen in Chattanooga, it can happen anywhere, anytime, anyplace,” the Texas Republican said on ABC’s “This Week.”

Mohammad Youssef Abdulazeez, who texted his friend an Islamic verse before the shooting spree and reportedly traveled to the Middle East recently, shot and killed four Marines and a Navy petty officer.

Homegrown or lone terrorists in the U.S. are a growing concern for security officials.

“What keeps us up at night are the ones we don’t know about,” McCaul said. “And I’m afraid this case falls into that category.”

Arizona Republic: Court Case Over Constitutional Rights of Mexican Child Needs Hashed Out

border patrol 3By Editorial Board
Arizona Republic 

Either the Constitution means something or it doesn’t.

When a U.S. cop shoots a Mexican kid through the border fence, it might be tempting to apply a more convenient standard.

But it won’t wash.

A federal judge in Tucson said the young man’s mother can take her case against a Border Patrol agent to court. She says the agent violated her son’s constitutional rights by firing through the fence and killing him on a sidewalk in Mexico.

“At its heart, this is a case alleging excessive deadly force by a U.S. Border Patrol agent standing on American soil brought before a United States Federal District Court tasked with upholding the United States Constitution,” U.S. District Court Judge Raner Collins wrote.

His order lets the case go forward. It does not determine the merits of the lawsuit.

The case matters because the Border Patrol has faced repeated allegations of human rights violations, ranging from the petty to the fatal. The agency lacks transparency and accountability.

What’s more, Collins says he “respectfully disagrees” with a Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that declined to extend constitutional protections to another youth shot in Mexico by U.S. agents firing across the line from Texas.

To read more click here. 

Boston Police Captain Faced Dilemma When Dealing with Son’s Growing Extremism

Terror Plot Officer's Son

Alexander Ciccolo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Boston Police Captain Robert Ciccolo faced a dilemma when he became concerned that his son may pose a danger because of his growing extremism.

His son, Alexander Ciccolo, was mentally ill and began talking about joining ISIS and fighting in Iraq and Syria, WBUR reports. Although his son hadn’t committed a crime, Capt. Ciccolo took the news to the FBI.

Now his son is charged with plotting to detonate a bomb at an unknown university following an FBI sting.

“Obviously, he struggled with him, and he couldn’t set him straight,” said Boston Police Commissioner William Evans. “So maybe getting locked up was the best thing. Maybe now he’ll get the medical care he needs.”

The son’s attorney thinks the father had a better alternative.

“This is a kid who should have been involuntarily committed in a mental hospital,” said defense attorney Harvey Silverglate, of Cambridge, Mass. “He would have been no danger to society. He would have been no danger to himself.”

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