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Archive for December 2nd, 2015

Uniformed Secret Service Officer Charged With Attempting to Transfer Obscene Materials to a Minor

Screen Shot 2015-12-02 at 11.36.19 AM

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A federal grand jury in Wilmington, Del. on Wednesday indicted an officer with the U.S. Secret Service-Uniformed Division, who was assigned to the White House, on one-count of attempting to transfer obscene materials to a minor.

Lee Robert Moore, 37, of Church Hill, Md.,  was  arrested Nov. 9, and has remained in custody, the Justice Department said.

A press release stated:

According to the indictment and court documents filed in the case, Moore allegedly maintained a profile on the social media application “Meet24,” which provides a mobile-based platform for exchanging digital images, as well as voice and text messages.  Delaware State Police Detectives with the Delaware Child Predator Task Force created a profile on this site, posing as a 14-year-old girl, with whom Moore allegedly engaged in a number of online chat sessions, via the “Meet24” and “Kik” mobile apps over a two-month period, including while Moore was at work.  A number of the online chats allegedly between Moore and the supposed female minor were sexual in nature and, on several occasions, Moore allegedly sent pictures of himself, including one depicting his penis.

 

Homeland Security Chief: Syrian Refugees Face Strong Scrutiny to Cross Border

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson told NPR that the fears over Syrian refugees are overstated, suggesting the focus should be on people traveling as tourists from Europe.

Johnson is restricting the visa waiver program because most of the suspects in the Paris attacks were legal residents of European countries and were not Syrian refugees.

For example, anyone who previously visited “terrorist safe havens” would be denied visa-free travel.

“What we want to do is work with Congress in ways that are effective to improve homeland security,” Johnson said. “The refugee program as it is currently exists is probably the most thorough, multilayered, time-consuming way for anyone to cross our borders, to come into this country.”

Other Stories of Interest

FBI Processed Record Number of Gun Background Checks on Black Friday

gun rugerBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI processed a whopping 185,345 firearm background checks on Black Friday, marking the highest single-day number since the bureau began conducting background checks in 1998, the Associated Press reports. 

The previous record was on Dec. 21, 2012, about a week after a deadly shooting rampage at a Connecticut elementary school.

The background checks for gun purchases rose about 5% over the past Black Friday.

The record-number background checks come after the Planned Parenthood shootings and the terrorist attacks in Paris.

FBI Demands Photo ID for Public Records Under New eFOIA Platform

fbi-logBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI launched a new online tool for Freedom of Information Act requests, but critics argue the disclosure requests have been made more difficult, Fed Scoop reports.

At issue are new conditions for requesting records, which include submitting a copy of a government-issued photo ID.

When the FBI launched their new eFOIA platform Monday, the bureau said the process of obtaining records would be streamlined.

Fed Scoop wrote:

However, listed in the terms are some new stipulations that have government transparency groups crying foul. For the FBI to consider a request, a photo of a government-issued ID has to be included with the request so that, according to the bureau, the FBI can be “confident in the identity of the requester.”

The bureau “just made that [requirement] up out of thin air,” Steven Aftergood, the director of the Federation of American Scientists’ Project on Government Secrecy, told FedScoop. “The new FBI terms of service exceed what the law requires and allows.”

The ID requirement goes well beyond the directions listed in the Justice Department’s FOIA guide. That guide, even for filings that require a confirmation of identity — such as a request for the requestor’s own FBI file — states that a notarized declaration by the requestor is sufficient.

“The FOIA itself makes clear that it can be used by ‘any person’ who invokes its provisions,” Aftergood said. “One doesn’t even need to be a U.S. citizen. So there is no basis for the FBI to require a government-issued ID.”

Illinois Attorney General Asks DOJ to Investigate Civil Rights Abuses in Chicago PD

chicago_police_patchBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is urging the Justice Department to launch a civil rights investigation into the Chicago Police Department over a number of cases in which cops killed or injured unarmed citizens, the Washington Post reports. 

Protesters are still outraged by a police shooting that killed a 17-year-old last year.

In a letter to Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Madigan listed several cases in which Chicago police officers shot unarmed citizens over the past few years.

Included in the list is the October 2014 fatal shooting of Laquan McDonald, who was 17. The officer who pulled the trigger, Jason Van Dyke, was charged with murder last week, the same day a disturbing dash-cam video of the incident was released.

“The McDonald shooting is shocking, and it highlights serious questions about the historic, systemic use of unlawful and excessive force by Chicago police officers and the lack of accountability for such abuse by CPD,” Madigan wrote.

New Mexico Man Sues Border Patrol Over Medical Marijuana Rights

medical marijuanaBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A New Mexico man filed suit against Border Patrol, saying agents are violating the law by refusing to allow him to posses medical marijuana, Las Cruces Sun-News reports.

Raymundo Marrufo filed the federal lawsuit in hopes of getting an injunction against Border Patrol for asking travelers about drugs at border checkpoints.

To obtain his medical cannabis, Marrufo must pass through a Border Patrol checkpoint, where he is asked whether he has any illegal drugs.

“If Marrufo answers ‘yes,’ he is a drug smuggler subject to felony indictment,” the court complaint states.

If Marrufo says no, he could be charged with lying to a federal agent.

“He doesn’t know if his life, for all intents and purposes, is going to end that day,” his attorney, Jason Flores-Williams, said in an interview Tuesday.

In the suit, Marrufo argues that a federal provision makes it illegal for the DOJ to interfere with state statues that allow the “use, distribution, possession or cultivation of medical marijuana.”

“Whether it is a sense of entitlement, indifference or simply ignorance of the law, the court must immediately issue an injunction enjoining the United States Border Patrol from asking questions and conducting searches that violate that Rohrabacher Amendment,” the complaint states.