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Archive for December 29th, 2016

D.C. U.S. Attorney Channing Phillips Named ticklethewire.com Fed of the Year for 2016

Channing Phillips/doj photo

Channing Phillips/DOJ photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

D.C. U.S. Attorney Channing D. Phillips has been named ticklethewire.com’s Fed of the Year for 2016.

Phillips, who began working for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in D.C. in 1994, was nominated by President Barack Obama to the U.S. Attorney post in Washington in October 2015. From 2011 to 2015, he served as counselor to the U.S. Attorney General, and was regarded as a calm, steady voice of reason at Main Justice during some bumpy times, which included the fallout from ATF’s Fast and Furious scandal.

He also served as executive director for the Attorney General’s Diversity Management Advisory Council and was the day-to-day coordinator for diversity-management issues within the Justice Department.

He’s continued to manage with a steady, calm hand at the U.S. Attorney’s Office, which under his tenure, has handled everything from public corruption and terrorism related cases to local crimes.  The yearly award is given to federal law enforcement officials who exemplify integrity, leadership and concern for their workers.  His contributions over the many years makes him worthy of the 2016 award.

As a side note, the U.S. Senate has yet to confirm Phillips.  And considering he was appointed by President Obama, he’s not likely to get confirmed after Donald Trump takes office.

Previous recipients of the ticklethewire.com Fed of the Year award include: Chicago U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald (2008):   Warren Bamford, who headed the Boston FBI (2009), Joseph Evans, regional director for the DEA’s North and Central Americas Region in Mexico City (2010);  Thomas Brandon, deputy Director of ATF (2011); John G. Perren, who was assistant director of WMD (Weapons of Mass Destruction) Directorate (2012); David Bowdich, special agent in charge of counterterrorism in Los Angeles (2013);  Loretta Lynch, who was U.S. Attorney in Brooklyn at the time (2014) and John “Jack” Riley,  the DEA’s acting deputy administrator (2015).

 

High School Student Accused of Posing As FBI Agent to Get Free Services from Prostitutes

police tapeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Police in Tulsa, Oklahoma, arrested a high school student Wednesday accused of posing as an FBI agent in an attempt to get free services from prostitutes.

The 18-year-old was caught in a sting at a south Tulsa hotel.

Police said the teen was threatening prostitutes so he could receive sex for free.

Police arrested the teenager and found him in possession of drug paraphernalia.

Dozens of Firearms Discovered at Airports Nationwide During Holiday Travel Break

Firearms discovered by the TSA during the holiday travel period. Photo via TSA.

Firearms discovered by the TSA during the holiday travel period. Photo via TSA.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

During the busy holiday travel break, the TSA found 80 firearms in carry-on bags at airports nationwide.

Of the 80 firearms, 65 were loaded, according to a weekly TSA blog. A round was chambered in 26 of the guns.

TSA officials also found four tubes of gun powder in a checked bag at Sioux Falls.

Officials also found grenades in checked bags at New Bern and Raleigh-Durham. Two swords were discovered in a carry-on in Atlanta.

Despite the TSA’s constant reminders about banned items, travelers continue to try to carry firearms and other weapons in carry-on bags.

Travelers are permitted to bring firearms in their checked baggage if they declare them with the airline.

Other Stories of Interest

Nearly 200 Homeland Security Employee Accepted Bribes in Past Decade

homeland-security-investigationsBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Nearly 200 employees and contract workers for Homeland Security have accepted bribes totaling about $150 million over the past 10 years, the New York Times reports. 

At the time, the employees were getting paid to protect the borders and enforce immigration laws.

The employees and contract workers have allowed tons of dugs and thousands of undocumented immigrants to be smuggled into the U.S. in exchange for bribes. They also illegally sold green cards and other immigration documents and provided sensitive information to drug cartels.

“It does absolutely no good to talk about the building of walls or tougher enforcement if you can’t secure the integrity of the immigration system, when you have fraud and corruption with your own employees,” said an internal affairs official at the Department of Homeland Security who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Although these employees represent less than 1% of the more than 250,000 people who work for Homeland Security, the impact is still broad.

“Any amount is bad, and one person alone can do a lot of damage,” said John Roth, the inspector general at the Department of Homeland Security. “It doesn’t have to be widespread.”

FBI Has Been Investigating Muncie, Ind. Officials Since At Least April

Muncie, Indiana

Muncie, Indiana

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has been investigating Muncie, Indiana, officials since at least April over allegations of misusing money and other misconduct.

The Star Press reports that agents have conducted interviews and subpoenaed hundreds of pages of documents. 

Among the issues is asbestos removal no-bid contracts that were awarded to companies owned by Muncie Building Commissioner Craig Nichols. Those companies received hundreds of thousands of dollars in contracts from the city.

Other allegations were raised by a fired city government employee, who also has come under suspicion.

The FBI has declined to discuss the investigation, so political observers have been speculating. Some believe between one and 30 people could be indicted.

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