best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

August 2017
S M T W T F S
« Jul   Sep »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for August 24th, 2017

Vermont’s Top FBI Official to Step Down for State Lottery Commission Post

Photo via FBI

Photo via FBI

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Daniel Rachek, who has led Vermont’s FBI office for the past six years, is stepping down to become the executive director of the state’s lottery commission.

The 22-year veteran of the bureau begins the new job Nov. 13, the Vermont Digger reports. 

Rachek supervised 20 employees and led financial investigation with the FBI.

“I’m honored to join Gov. Scott’s team and to maximize the lottery’s contributions to Vermont’s economic future by supporting education funding,” Rachek said in the news release.

The state-run Vermont Lottery Commission oversees the lottery system.

“Danny’s extensive public service and financial experience provides a level of expertise and a professional commitment that will set the standard in the lottery’s future efforts,” Scott said in the announcement.

Border Patrol’s Brownsville Station Gets 25-Year Veteran As New Leader

border-patrol-suv-via-border-patrolBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Jaime Salazar, a 25-year veteran of the Border Patrol, was recently appointed agent in charge of the agency’s Brownsville station.

Salazar joined the Border Patrol as an agent in June 1992 and has worked his way through the ranks, most recently serving as a strategic advisor to the ICE/ERO deputy director in 2017, the Brownsville Herald reports

The Brownsville Border Patrol Station oversees 23 miles of river and 80 square miles of Cameron County.

The Herald wrote:

Salazar became a Border Patrol agent on June 4, 1992 and was assigned to the Chula Vista Station in the San Diego Sector. In 1997, he was promoted to senior patrol agent in Harlingen and subsequently promoted to supervisor in 1998.

In 2002, he was promoted to the PAIC over the Intelligence Unit for the Rio Grande Valley Sector, where in over eight years he transformed the Sector Intelligence Unit. In 2010, Salazar was promoted as the first J2/Intelligence Commander for CBP in Laredo.

In 2013, Salazar became an associate chief in the Law Enforcement Operations Directorate at the United Stated Border Patrol Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

In 2014, he was appointed deputy director for the Department of Homeland Security Human Smuggling Cell, a White House National Security Council Interagency taskforce established to combat international human smuggling efforts. Two years later, he became the acting director for the CBP Counter Network Division charged with integrating operations, intelligence and analysis. He later became a strategic advisor to the ICE/ERO Deputy Director in 2017.

Ways President Trump Could Stop Draining the Secret Service

secret-servic-via-secret-serviceBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump, whose frequent vacations and large family have drained the Secret Service budget, could take simple steps to relieve the burden on those hired to protect him.

The USA Today spoke with former Secret Service officials and ethics experts to list ways Trump could save the agency money. 

Among the ideas is spending more time at the White House.

“That would help solve the problem,” said John Magaw, a former Secret Service director.

Since taking office, Trump has travel a total of a dozen times to both his estate in Mar-a-Largo, Fla., and his Bedminister, N.J., golf club.

Another solution would be declining his children protection.

“I don’t see any way for the government to avoid these security expenditures, unless the family declines the protection services,” said Scott Amey, chief counsel at the nonpartisan Project on Government Oversight. “The Secret Service, like all federal agencies, has a budget and it must operate within the limitations of that budget.” 

Some of Trump’s children frequently travel to promote Trump-branded properties around the world, and they’re using the Secret Service for protection.

7 Infrastructure Advisers Quit, Saying Trump Is Making Country Less Safe

President Trump, via White House

President Trump, via White House

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump’s controversial response to the violence that broke out during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., has prompted the resignations of seven members of the National Infrastructure Advisory Council this week.

Their concerns are that Trump is making the country less safe by failing to quickly and sternly denounce hate groups.

“Your actions have threatened the security of the homeland I took an oath to protect,” the resigning members wrote in a letter sent Monday and obtained by HuffPost

“You failed to denounce the intolerance and violence of hate groups,” the letter read.

Huffington Post wrote:

The resigning members include Cristin Dorgelo, former chief of staff at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy under President Barack Obama; DJ Patil, former White House chief data scientist; and Christy Goldfuss, former managing director at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. All three confirmed to HuffPost that they had resigned.

Daniel Tangherlini, a former administrator of the General Services Administration, was also among those who resigned, CQ Roll Call confirmed on Wednesday. Seven total people resigned, according to Dorgelo and Goldfuss.

A White House spokesperson did not respond to HuffPost’s request for comment. But a White House statement published by Reuters on Tuesday said “We can confirm that a number of members of the [council] who had been appointed under the previous administration have submitted their resignation.” 

The National Infrastructure Advisory Council is made up of presidential appointees from the private sector, academia and government, and was originally founded in 2001 under then-President George W. Bush. It advises the president on security, including cybersecurity, for critical infrastructure like water systems. There are now only 20 members listed on the council’s website, down from 27 earlier today.

Convicted Drug Lord Re-Sentenced in Murder of DEA Agent Enrique Camarena

DEA Agent Enrique Camarena

DEA Agent Enrique Camarena

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Convicted drug lord Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo was re-sentenced by a Mexican court to 37 years in prison and a reparation payment equivalent to $1.2 million.

Felix Gallardo, who was considered the godfather of Mexican drug smuggling and the co-founder of the Guadalajara cartel, had previously been sentenced to 40 years in prison for the murder of DEA Agent Enrique Camarena.

Some of those convicted in the murder had filed appeals.

Rafael Caro Quintero, who was released from prison in 2013 following an appeals court decision to overturn his conviction, is to be re-sentenced. He remains at large, but a warrant has been issued for his arrest. 

Trump Administration Slaps Visa Restrictions on 4 Countries over Immigration Response

President Trump

President Trump

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Trump administration has slapped visa sanctions against four countries for their refusal to allow for the return of citizens whom the U.S. is trying to deport.

Homeland Security and the State Department confirmed the sanctions but declined to list the four countries.

Sources told the Washington Times that the countries were Cambodia, Eritrea, Guinea and Sierra Leone.

The administration is using an effective, but rarely used tool for requiring compliance.

“We can confirm the Department of State has received notification from the Department of Homeland Securityregarding four countries that have refused to accept or unreasonably delayed the return of its nationals,” a department official told The Washington Times.

Other Stories of Interest