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Archive for September 7th, 2018

Weekend Series on Crime: Dangerous Biker Gangs

Motorola Solutions Foundation Donates $30,000 to DEA Fund To Help Families

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Motorola Solutions Foundation has donated $30,000 to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Survivors Benefit Fund (DEASBF), which provides educational and line-of-duty death benefits to the families of DEA’s fallen.

The Motorola foundation is a charitable arm of Motorola Solutions, Inc.

“The DEASBF is very appreciative for the generous donation by the Motorola Solutions Foundation and for providing vital assistance to the families of DEA’s fallen. Motorola Solutions Foundation has donated a future to the children of our fallen,” said DEASBF Chairman Richard Crock in a statement.

Currently, the DEASBF is funding the college education of 8 children who lost their fathers in the line of duty.

Motorola Solutions Foundation awards grants each year to organizations, such as the DEASBF, which support and advance public safety programs and technology and engineering education initiatives, a press release says.

To donate to the fun click here.

 

Woodward Book: Trump’s Meltdown Over Mueller And Failed Mock Interview

Bob Woodward’s new book, “Fear: Trump in the White House”

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

Bob Woodward’s new tell-all book, “Fear: Trump in the White House,” offers revealing, behind-the-scenes glimpses of the president’s reaction to the ongoing special counsel investigation of possible Russian collision and obstruction of Justice.

According to the new book, Trump believed Mueller had too many conflicts to be special counsel, including his past membership to Trump National Golf Club and his firm’s former relationship with his son-in-law. 

The appointment of Mueller in May 2017 incensed the president, according to the book.

“The president erupted into uncontrollable anger, visibly agitated to a degree that no one in his inner circle had witnessed before. It was a harrowing experience,” Woodward wrote.

The book also suggests Trump failed a mock interview to prepare for a possible sit-down with Mueller.

The president initially told the public he wanted to sit for an interview with Mueller. But during a practice interview with his former personal attorney, John Dowd, Trump performed miserably, at times contradicting himself and lying, sources told Woodward.

“Don’t testify. It’s either that or an orange jumpsuit,” Dowd told the president.

According to the book, which is scheduled for a Sept. 11 release, Dowd told Mueller’s team that the president did not perform well.

“I’m not going to sit there and let him look like an idiot,” Dowd told Mueller. “And you publish that transcript, because everything leaks in Washington, and the guys overseas are going to say, ‘I told you he was an idiot. I told you he was a [expletive] dumbbell. What are we dealing with this idiot for?'”

Down decided to step down shortly after, telling Trump, “You’re not a good witness.”

He continued, “Mr. President, I’m afraid I just can’t help you.”

Combating Opioids And Reemergence of Cocaine, Heroin Is Priority for New Head of FBI’s Pittsburgh Office

Bob Jones, new head of the Pittsburgh Field Office

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

The opioid crisis and the revival of cocaine and meth in Pennsylvania and West Virginia is the focus of the new head of the FBI’s Pittsburgh office.

Bob Jones, who recently took over the office, said law enforcement has made a dent in the sale of heroin and prescription painkillers, but the crisis if far from over.

“We’ve been knocking opioids down a little bit, but people are turning to other drugs,” he told the Tribune Review.

Jones also is concerned about the troubling reemergence of cocaine and meth and said the opioid epidemic “is still killing people.”

A native of the Pittsburgh area and graduate of Penn State University, Jones said he has “been trying to come back for the last 32 years.”

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