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Tag: agents

GOP Presidential Candidate Fiorina: IRS Has More Agents Than FBI, CIA

Carly Fiorina

Carly Fiorina

By Steve Neavling

Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina pointed out “a startling fact” on Tuesday: The IRS has more agents than the FBI and CIA.

“Does that strike you as a mis-allocation of resources? Of course it is. We need to take this terror threat seriously,” Fiorina said in an interview with Fox News. 

While it’s unclear how many agents the CIA has because of its classified budget, the employment numbers are disproportionate. The IRS is authorized in its budget to have 82,203 employees, while the FBI has 35,000 employees.

Fiorina said she supports increasing “the amount of agents we have on the ground.”

“Let’s get real here and talk about who’s the enemy and do what is necessary to protect our nation, because the first and most important responsibility of the federal government is to protect the nation,” she said.

FBI Foils Alleged Plans by White Supremacists to Shoot Up, Bomb Church And Synagogues

fbi-badgeBy Steve Neavling

The FBI said it has disrupted two men’s plans to shoot up or bomb churches and synagogues.

The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that FBI agents were posing as illegal arms dealers who received orders for guns and explosives from two men who were part of a white supremacy group.

The men, Robert C. Doyle, 34, of Chester, and Ronald Beasley Chaney III, 33, were charged  Monday in U.S. District Court in Richmond with attempting to buy the weapons from FBI agents.

“Doyle and Chaney and others known and unknown to the FBI, ascribe to a white supremacy extremist version of the Asatru faith (a pagan religion),” alleges a five-page affidavit from FBI Special Agent James R. Rudisill.

The agent said the plan was for Doyle and others to meet at Doyle’s house “to discuss acting out in furtherance of their extremist beliefs by shooting or bombing the occupants of black churches and Jewish synagogues, conducting acts of violence against persons of the Jewish faith, and doing harm to a gun store owner.”

Internal Review by Border Patrol Rejects Body Cameras for Agents

Border Patrol agents reads the Miranda rights to a Mexican national arrested for transporting drugs.By Steve Neavling

Even as Border Patrol faces increased scrutiny for using excessive force along the U.S.-Mexico border, CBP concluded that body cameras aren’t needed for agents, MSNBC reports. 

The yearlong internal review found that body cameras would be too costly, sink agent morale and make law enforcement more ineffective.

The review was prompted by complaints of excessive force – even deadly force – by Border Patrol agents.

The conclusions drawn in the view are “dated” and don’t “reflect the agency’s deliberations over the past months or conclusions of CBP leadership, the agency said in a statement.

More than 20,000 agents patrol the U.S. border, which would make it the largest law enforcement agency in the nation to use body cameras.

“Body-worn cameras have the potential to provide huge benefits for Customs and Border Protection and the public,” said Jacinta Ma, Director of Policy and Advocacy at the National Immigration Forum. “As the largest law enforcement agency in the country, CBP has an opportunity to step up.”

Border Patrol to Hire 1,000 New Agents in Largest Hiring Spree in Nearly a Decade

Border PatrolBy Steve Neavling

Border Patrol is taking up to 30,000 applications for field agent jobs, marking its largest recruitment effort in nearly a decade, the Monitor reports. 

“With the arrival of the UTRGV School of Medicine, SpaceX, increased international trade, increased private businesses and government jobs there is no doubt the Rio Grande Valley is experiencing economic growth,” said RGV sector Acting Chief Raul Ortiz.

Congress enacted a law in 2006 requiring Border Patrol to have at least 21,000 agents.

Border Patrol plans to hire about 1,000 agents.

Applicants must be between the agents of 18 and 37.

The process is expected to take about seven months.

Las Vegas Review-Journal: Another Failure of Drug War is Lack of Accountability

dea-badgeBy Editorial Board
Las Vegas Review-Journal

Each year, the United States spends more than $51 billion on the war on drugs — a war we’re clearly losing. The war has become so futile that the federal agency charged with leading the fight has undermined its own mission — and no one is being held accountable.

A Justice Department review found that, for years, DEA agents assigned to Colombia indulged in sex parties involving prostitutes supplied by drug cartels. The report found that local police often stood guard during the parties, keeping an eye on the agents’ weapons and other belongings, and that three DEA supervisors involved in the parties accepted gifts of money, weapons and other items from the cartels.

“Most of the sex parties occurred in government-leased quarters where agents’ laptops, BlackBerry devices and other government-issued equipment were present … potentially exposing them to extortion, blackmail or coercion,” the report said.

Despite the fact that the misconduct put agents and national security at risk, the agency’s Office of Security Programs was never made aware of the issue, and the agents were issued paltry suspensions ranging from 10 to as little as two days.

But DEA misconduct goes much deeper.

According to newly released U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration discipline logs reviewed by USA Today and the Huffington Post, agency employees have avoided termination for a variety of serious violations, including falsifying official records, having an “improper association with a criminal element” using and distributing drugs and driving government vehicles while drunk. And when administrators did recommend termination — which was rare — the agency’s Board of Professional Conduct often rolled back the punishments to suspensions and lesser penalties, and even forced the DEA to rehire the violators.

No accountability whatsoever within a federal agency? Where have we heard this before?

The findings in the Justice Department, USA Today and Huffington Post reviews highlight a culture of corruption within the DEA. It’s unrealistic to expect an entire workforce to be free of misconduct. But it’s reasonable to demand that problem employees are terminated.

This is more proof that the war on drugs is a counterproductive boondoggle of epic proportions.

To read more click here. 

DEA Rarely Fires Agents Who Commit Serious Misconduct

dea-badgeBy Steve Neavling

DEA agents who have lied to authorities, falsified records, dealt drugs and committed other serious misconduct have been allowed to stay on the job, USA Today reports.

The discovery comes after lawmakers expressed frustration that agents were never fired for attending “sex parties” in Columbia.

Records from the DEA’s disciplinary files show that was hardly the only instance in which the DEA opted not to fire employees despite apparently serious misconduct, The USA Today writes.

The newspaper found that only 13 of the 50 employees recommended to be fired by the DEA’s Board of Professional Conduct were actually terminated.

“If we conducted an investigation, and an employee actually got terminated, I was surprised,” said Carl Pike, a former DEA internal affairs investigator. “I was truly, truly surprised. Like, wow, the system actually got this guy.”

Some members of Congress are calling for more action.

“There is a culture of protection internally that has to change. If there’s a bad apple, they need to be fired, if not prosecuted, and that’s just not happening,” said Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. “Federal law enforcement should be held to the highest standard.”

Other Stories of Interest

Less Than Half of U.S.-Mexico Border Is Under ‘Operational Control,’ Agents Say

border fence photoBy Steve Neavling

Think the Mexico-U.S. border is safer. Think again.

So says Brandon Judd, president of the National Border Patrol Council, who told Congress Wednesday that only 40% of the border is under “operational control,” The Washington Times reports. 

Judd also said that 20% of illegal immigrants who were captured had criminals records.

“This is the challenge we are facing at the border today,” he said. “There are those who will point to lower apprehension rates and tell you the border is secure. Border Patrol agents, however, throughout this nation will tell you the border is not secure, and the southwest border certainly is not safe.”

The assertions contradict claims by President Obama’s administration that conditions at the border are improving.

Less Than Half of U.S.-Mexico Border Is Under ‘Operational Control,’ Agents Say

Encounter a Rude or Abusive TSA Agent? Launch a Complaint on Yelp

TSABy Steve Neavling

Travelers can now report TSA agents who are abusive or rude.

CNN reports that Yelp, known for restaurant and business reviews, has reached an agreement with the federal government to allow the TSA to respond to reviews.

While travelers have always had the ability to leave comments about TSA agents, there was never a single page or official place to launch those complaints. Now there is.

The idea is to hold government employees more accountable.

Other Stories of Interest