Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

November 2019
S M T W T F S
« Oct    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: ambassador

Russia Recalling U.S. Ambassador Kislyak Amid FBI Investigation

Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak, who has been the subject of an investigation into his country’s alleged meddling in the U.S. presidential election, is being recalled after 10 years on the job.

Buzzfeed reports the Kremlin has ordered its U.S. ambassador to return to Russia amid growing investigations by the FBI and Congress into whether the foreign government tried interfere in the election to help Donald Trump. 

The FBI is probing meetings held between Kislyak, 66, and Trump’s campaign team. Among those who met with Kislyak are Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and former national security adviser Mike Flynn. During Sessions’ confirmation hearing, he failed to disclose at least two meetings with Kislyak, whom one U.S.-based diplomat responded “could use some time away.”

At other times, Kushner and Flynn denied now-confirmed meetings with the ambassador.

Russia has yet to confirm when Kislyak is returning to Russia  or whether he’ll be reassigned.

Justice Department Files First Charges in Attack on U.S. Consulate in Benghazi

 

Rep. Issa/gov photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Nearly a year after protesters barged into the U.S. consulate in Benghazi , Libya, and killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans, the Justice Department filed the first criminal charges in the case, the Washington Post reports

According to numerous reports, the Justice Department filed an unspecified number of counts in the September 2012 attack on the consulate.

“The department’s investigation is ongoing. It has been, and remains, a top priority,” said Justice Department spokesman Andrew C. Ames, who declined to comment further.

Details remain unclear, but members of Congress are pressing the administration for more than charges.

“Osama bin Laden had been criminally charged long before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks but was not apprehended,” Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, said in a statement. “Delays in apprehending the suspected Benghazi killers,” Issa added, “will only put American lives at further and needless risk.”

FBI Team Arrives in Libya to Investigate Deaths of Four Americans

 Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A team of FBI agents is in Libya to investigate the killings of four Americans during an attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, the Washington Post reports.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Tuesday an undisclosed number of agents arrived in Libya following delays fueled by concerns about continued violence, according to the Post.

“The FBI has joined the investigation on the ground in Libya and we will not rest until the people who orchestrated this attack are found and punished,” Clinton told reporters, the Washington Post reported.

The attack on the consulate, which was spurred by an anti-Muslim video, killed U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other State Department employees.

FBI Warns of Potential Violence in U.S. Following Satirical Film About Prophet Mohammed

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI and Department of Homeland Security are warning of potential violence spreading to the U.S. following a satirical movie mocking the Prophet Mohammed, ABC News reports.

The Joint Intelligence Bulletin warned that “the risk of violence could increase both at home and abroad as the film continues to gain attention.”

The warning comes a few days after an attack on a U.S. consulate in Libya killed Ambassador Christopher Stevens and four others.

While there are no specific threats, U.S. officials said violent extremists hope to exploit Muslim anger over the film, ABC News reported.

A Secretive Nixon Said the Wealthy Better Equipped for Ambassadorships

white house photo

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Assuredly the  Occupy Wall Street folks would find President Nixon’s grand jury testimony of interest.

In newly released documents of President Richard Nixon’s 1974 grand jury testimony, the president admitted to giving precedence to wealthy campaign contributors when assigning foreign ambassador posts.

The president maintained that such assignations were not “commitments” made for contributions. Rather, the president reasoned that big contributors, who are generally wealthy, have justified their qualifications by the mere fact of their wealth.

“Certainly, no sale of ambassadorship should be made,” he told investigators, “but, on the other hand, the fact that an individual has proved himself on the American scene, has proved himself by legitimately building a great fortune, rather than being a disqualifier should be a factor that can be considered and should be considered in determining whether he should get a position.”

Much of the questioning surrounded whether or not an explicit agreement of a “commitment” had been made between among Nixon and his advisors, trading ambassadorships for campaign contributions.

Nixon later stated that he gave “top consideration to major financial contributors mainly for the reason that big contributors in many instances make better ambassadors, particularly where American economic interests are involved.” Still, at times it seems hard to draw the line of distinction.

Regarding another appointed ambassador, Nixon stated, “Pearl Mesta wasn’t sent to Luxembourg because she had big bosoms. Pearl Mesta went to Luxembourg because she made a good contribution.”

In Nixon’s opening statements to the grand jury he expressed the “vital necessity of confidentiality in presidential communications,” saying that information he may reveal to the grand jury, if circulated in the press and among the American public, could hurt American interests.

He cited reports then in newspapers of past presidents okaying assassinations, saying such disclosures, though probably untrue, were not in the public interest. “This is the reason why I have resisted in the courts … attempts to impinge upon the privileged status of such conversations,” he said. Only with absolute guarantee of no disclosure, Nixon told investigators in his opening remarks, “I will reveal for the first time information … which, if it is made public, will be terribly damaging to the United States.”

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Panamanian Pres. Ricardo Martinelli Wanted DEA to Wiretap Political Opponents

Panama Pres. Ricardo Martinelli/wikipedia photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Good or bad, one thing is certain: The WikiLeaks documents are pretty fascinating.

One of the latest ones of interest has surfaced in some publications including  the Washington Post, which reports that Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli was trying to put the squeeze on the DEA to wiretap his political opponents.

“He clearly made no distinction between legitimate security targets and political enemies,” then-U.S. Ambassador Barbara Stephenson wrote in her Aug. 22, 2009 report, the Post reported.

The Post reported that Martinelli via a BlackBerry message wrote to Stephenson: “I need help tapping phones.”

In her cable, the U.S. ambassador said Martinelli’s requests were rebuffed, the Post reported.

“We will not be party to any effort to expand wiretaps to domestic political targets,” Stephenson wrote.

Another cable reported that head of the Mexican military told U.S. authorities last year that Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, the head of the Sinaloa drug cartel, moved around a lot and was “difficult” to capture because he surrounds himself with hundreds of armed men and a sophisticated web of snitches, the Post reported.

To read more click here.

Related Story: Cables Portray Extended Reach of DEA (NY Times)