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Tag: ATF

ATF Offers $10K Reward After 8 Milwaukee Businesses Were Set Ablaze

ATF_LogoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The ATF is offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to the capture and conviction of arsonists who set fire to eight Milwaukee businesses during an uprising over the weekend.

The Washington Times reports that arsonists targeted a gas station, beauty supply store, auto parts store, supermarket and three liquor stores on Saturday and Sunday night.

A rally over three fatal shooting of Sylville Smith, an armed black man, turned violent after police tried to stop a march.

Seven officers also were injured.

The damage is “estimated to exceed several million dollars,” the ATF said.

Other Stories of Interest

Ex-ATF Agent Agrees to Pay $40,000 After Falsely Claiming He Had Cancer to Collect Sick Leave Pay

Icon_scam11

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A former ATF agent who faked having cancer to collect sick leave pay, has agreed to pay the federal government $40,000 to resolve the matter, the Justice Department announced this week.

The Justice Department’s Civil Division alleged that Douglas daCosta of Livermore, Calif.  agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve allegations that he falsely claimed more than 80 days paid sick leave while working as a criminal investigator for the ATF’s San Francisco field division from January 2009 until his retirement in June 2009.

Specifically, the government alleged that  daCosta falsely told his supervisors that he was undergoing extensive treatment for cancer and went as far as to provide a forged letter from a physician to back his claim, the government said in a press release, noting that he did not have cancer.

“When a law enforcement officer misuses taxpayer funds, he does a disservice to his colleagues who serve with professionalism and distinction,”  Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Benjamin C. Mizer, head of the Justice Department’s Civil Division, said in a statement. “This settlement shows that we will not hesitate to hold individuals accountable if they misuse taxpayer funds.”

DaCosta had worked for ATF for 28 years.

His Linkedin page states that he currently works for an international security and investigations firm.

 

ATF Sends About 20 Agents to Help Investigate Shooting of Kansas City Officer

USA_-_KANSAS_-_Kansas_City_police_departmentBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The ATF is helping police investigate the fatal shooting Tuesday of a Kansas City, Kansas, officer.

Police said 46-year-old Capt. Robert Melton was gunned down while investigating report of a drive-by shooting, the Imperial Valley Press reports. 

The ATF has sent about 20 agents to the scene of the shooting. They will be on hand to provide help with ballistics and any other facets of the investigation.

A spokesman for the police department said it wasn’t clear whether the officers on the scene were ambushed.

“The investigation needs to play out before that can be determined,” he said.

ATF: Orlando Nightclub Shooter Legally Purchased Guns Days Before Attack

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Just days before he opened fire at an Orlando nightclub, killing 50 people, Omar Mateen legally purchased a handful and long gun, the ATF said.

Mateen, who was twice investigated by the FBI for suspected ties to terrorists, was not barred from buying a gun.

“He is not a prohibited person,” ATF Assistant Special Agent in Charge Trevor Velinor said.

Florida residents can legally purchase assault weapons and high-capacity magazines.

Mateen reportedly pledged allegiance to ISIS before the attack.

FBI, ATF Help Investigate Suspected Murder-Suicide at UCLA Campus

UCLA campus, via Wikipedia.

UCLA campus, via Wikipedia.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI and ATF are helping investigate what appears to be a murder-suicide on the campus of UCLA on Wednesday.

Agents from both agencies responded to the campus shooting soon after it was reported, UPI reports. 

Police confirmed two people – both male – were shot dead. One of the men shot himself.

Their ages and identities have not yet been released.

“There is a note. I don’t know if it’s a suicide note. I don’t know if it’s a confession. I don’t know what it is,” the LAPD chief told reporters.

ATF Concludes Deadly Fire at Texas Fertilizer Facility Was Intentionally Set

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A massive explosion at a fertilizer facility in Texas that killed more than three dozen people and injured hundreds was intentionally set, the ATF said Wednesday.

The announcement comes more than three years after the explosion.

The ATF said it has ruled out “all reasonable, accidental and natural causes,” the Washington Post reports. 

The agency has not made any arrests yet and is offering a $50,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the person or people responsible.

The explosion also leveled nearby homes.

Other Stories of Interest

Congressman Pushes Bill to Rename ATF Headquarters After Slain Agent Ariel Rios

Ariel Rios

Ariel Rios

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Congressman André Carson from Indiana hopes history repeats itself.

The Congressman has introduced a bill to name ATF headquarters at 99 New York Avenue NE in Washington as the Ariel Rios Federal Building.

ATF agent Rios, 28, was murdered by drug traffickers in Miami in 1982 while assigned to then Vice President George Bush’s South Florida Drug Task Force. He was the first ATF agent killed by hostile action.

It’s not such an unusual request considering the old ATF headquarters at 1200 Pennsylvania Ave NW was named after Rios in 1985.

In 2007, ATF moved into a more secure headquarters on New York Avenue, but Congress never named the new building after Rios.

“Naming the ATF headquarters after Ariel Rios is an important symbolic reminder of risks faced by ATF’s front line agents and their ongoing service to our country,” said Rep. Carson in a letter to colleagues asking them to co-sponsor the bill. “As a former law enforcement officer, I believe this important recognition  of Ariel Rios will serve as a tribute to every frontline law enforcement officer past, present, and future.”

According to ATF, Rios and another agent, Alex D’Atri,  made arrangements to meet with two suspects at the Hurricane Motel in Miami to make an undercover buy of large quantities of cocaine and machineguns. One of the suspects suddenly became suspicious, drew his weapon and made threats.

Rios struggled with him and was shot. He died shortly after in the hospital. The other agent, D’Atri, was shot and wounded but survived.   

Read Rep. André Carson’s full letter to Congressional colleagues.

Dear Colleague:

I am writing to ask you to cosponsor the “Ariel Rios Federal Building Act”
which  will name the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
(ATF) headquarters in honor of its first special agent killed by hostile
action. This bill will designate the federal building at 99 New York Avenue,
NE Washington D.C. as the Ariel Rios Federal Building. Ariel Rios was a
young ATF special agent murdered by drug traffickers in 1982 while assigned
to then Vice President George Bush’s South Florida Drug Task Force.

In 1985, Congress designated the ATF headquarters building at 1200
Pennsylvania Avenue as the Ariel Rios Memorial Federal Building.  The
designation honored both the personal sacrifice of Ariel Rios and served as
an enduring reminder of the dangers that front line law enforcement officers
willingly confront to keep the rest of us safe.  For nearly 30 years, the
original ATF headquarters building bore the name of Ariel Rios.

Read more »

Congressman Urges Passage of ATF Enforcement Act to End Gun Hypocrisy

gunsBy Rep. Donald S. Beyer Jr.
for Washington Post

Those who oppose gun safety legislation often contend that the president and Congress should enforce existing gun laws before considering any new ones. National Rifle Association President Wayne LaPierre has said that under current federal law, President Obama “could take every felon with a gun, drug dealer with a gun, and criminal gang banger with a gun off the streets tomorrow and lock ’em up for five years or more”; House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.), who holds great power over whether gun legislation sees the light of day, has said that “the federal government is not doing the job they should be doing in enforcing our current gun laws.”

We should call their bluff. The truth is that Congress routinely blocks the power of the federal agency responsible for overseeing and investigating firearms sales: the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF). The ATF is unable to carry out its mission because of the multiple obstacles placed in its path. For example, a 2004 budget amendment blocked the agency from providing data on the tracing of guns used in crimes for any state license revocation action or civil lawsuit. Gun-trace data are critically important for sourcing illegally trafficked firearms and identifying corrupt gun dealers. Another amendment that year banned any requirement that gun dealers keep a physical inventory of their wares. In 2012, Congress said that the ATF couldn’t deny applications to import any shotgun simply because it lacked a sporting purpose. The list goes on.

So what if we didn’t pass new gun safety laws, but instead simply returned to the ATF the authority and autonomy to fully perform its duties? What if this key agency were enabled “to protect communities from violent criminals . . . the illegal use and trafficking of firearms . . . [and] acts of terrorism,” as its mission statement reads, without interference?

Tuesday I will introduce the ATF Enforcement Act, which would restore the agency’s ability to enforce existing gun laws by removing legislative limitations on its operations, enforcement and day-to-day functions. My bill would also allow the person picked to be ATF director to bypass the Senate confirmation process by moving the appointment power to the attorney general. For years, congressional allies of the gun lobby have blocked nominees by both Democratic and Republican presidents. Only one nominee has been confirmed since the position was made subject to Senate approval in 2006.

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