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Tag: attacks

Border Patrol Assaults Reach Record High This Fiscal Year

File photo of a Border Patrol agent.

File photo of a Border Patrol agent.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It has been an especially dangerous year to be a Border Patrol agent.

This fiscal year, a record-high 671 agents have been assaulted while working, according to new government data obtained by the Washington Examiner

The total assaults at the Customs and Border Protection’s three branches –  Border Patrol, Air and Marine Operations and Office Field Operations. – were 720, compared to 585 last fiscal year.

The attacks most often target Border Patrol agents, who saw assaults increase 167% since the same period last year. 

The Examiner wrote:

Despite the increasing rate of assaults on immigration and customs officials, the agency is using force against attackers at a lower rate than last year. Officers from all three agencies used force in 416 instances in the current fiscal year compared to 543 times in the same time frame a year earlier. The majority of those instances did not involve firearms.

Assaults have been on the rise since earlier this year and surpassed last year’s total number of attacks in the first eight months of fiscal year 2017.

The number of illegal immigrants apprehended at the border fell in the first few months of President Trump’s presidency, but has increased over the last several months.

Other Stories of Interest

Border Patrol Agents Are Getting Attacked Fewer Times Than Previous Years

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Assaults against Border Patrol agents dropped for the sixth year in a row in fiscal 2014, the Arizona Republic reports.

The agency recorded 373 assaults against agents, a 20% decline over 2013. Of those, 366 occurred along the Southwest border.

That represents a two-thirds drop since fiscal 2008.

Although CPB has broken down the types of assaults in the past, it hadn’t by the Republic’s deadline.

Despite the drop in attacks, agents still feel more vulnerable to attack.

“Agents out there are saying that the people we arrest are less likely to listen to verbal commands,” said Art Del Cueto, president of the Tucson local of the National Border Patrol Council, a union representing agents. “They tend to want to run more, to push back against the agent, to be verbally aggressive.”

Homeland Security Expert: Libya Needs Help with ‘Fragile’ Security

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 The U.S. has failed to support Libya after the killing of its longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi in October 2011, said former Homeland Security adviser Fran Townsend, CNN reports.

Townsend made the remarks Wednesday morning after the killing of U.S. Ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens.

Townsend said the country has a “very fragile” state of security, CNN reported.

“The first indication of a working democracy if that it can protect its own people,” Townsend said. “And Libya is struggling. I was there. To take in the military elements, the ministry of interior and border guards [are] trying to get the equipment they need. And the attention of the international community, quite frankly, has turned elsewhere.”

 STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

UPDATED: Report Says Army Could Have “Prevented” Anthrax Attacks in 2001 and Psychiatric Records Support FBI Findings That Bruce Ivins “Was Responsible”

Anthrax Suspect Bruce Ivins

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

And now for more on the anthrax controversy.

A court-ordered report by the Expert Behavorial Analysis Panel concluded the U.S. Army could have “anticipated” and “prevented” the deadly 2001 anthrax attacks, and that a review of psychiatric records of suspect Bruce Ivins “does support the Department of Justice’s (DOJ’s)determination that he was responsible.”

Ivins, a civilian Army scientist at Ft. Detrick, Md., who committed suicide before authorities could charge him, “was psychologically disposed to undertake the mailings; his behavioral history demonstrated his potential for carrying them out; and he had the motivation and means,” according to the Expert Behavioral Analysis Panel , which was created in 2009 to review Ivins and the deadly attacks. News of the report first appeared in the Los Angeles Times.

The Expert Behavioral Analysis Panel found that Ivins displayed unusual behavior — some that was dismissed as eccentricity — that should have led the Army to do a better mental health evaluation. It also said Ivins’ mental health professionals would have advised against it had they known he had a high level security clearance.

The report was welcoming news for the Justice Department and FBI, which has taken some heat from from skeptics who don’t believe that Ivins is the person who mailed the deadly letters that killed five people and sickened 17 others.

“The FBI appreciates the efforts, time, and expertise of the panel and its highly respected chair and members,” the agency said in a statement.”The panel’s analysis, findings, and recommendations provide important insight that will further contribute to the public’s understanding of the investigation into the deadly anthrax mailings.”

The report portrays Ivins was someone who had a “traumatic, damaging childhood” and an abusive one.

“Dr. Ivins grew up in a family in which there is ample evidence that his mother assaulted and abused her husband — stabbing him, and beating him and threatening to kill him with a loaded gun,” the report said. “It also appears she abused Dr. Ivins as a boy, and his father mocked him publicly as well.”

Some fellow scientists and politicians on Capitol Hill — along with Ivins’ attorney — remain skeptical that Ivins mailed the deadly letters that killed 5 people and sickened 17 others.

Read Summary of Report

Memo Says Terrorists to Try For More Attacks Inside U.S. With “Increased Frequency”

terrorismBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — It’s no surprise considering the frequency of attempted terrorist attacks within the U.S. in the past year.

CNN reports that an unclassified Department of Homeland Security memo dated May 21 to law enforcement says “the number and pace of attempted attacks against the United States over the past nine months have surpassed the number of attempts during any other previous one-year period.”

The report said terrorist groups were expected to try for more attacks inside the U.S. with “increased frequency.”

To read more click here.

Attacks on IRS and its Employees Too Common, Washington Post Reports

Maybe it’s not surprising that in an economic downturn where people are afraid of losing their money, some people who are unstable are taking their frustrations to the next level.

irs

By Ed O’Keefe
Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Attacks on the Internal Revenue Service and its employees similar to Thursday’s small plane crash in Texas are common, according to federal records and investigations.

“There is a direct correlation between increased IRS enforcement efforts and the number of threats made against IRS employees,” said J. Russell George, who heads the office of the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. His office handled more than 1,200 threat and assault case referrals from the IRS and its employees between fiscal 2001 and 2008. The cases resulted in more than 167 indictments and at least 195 convictions, he said.

The nation’s economic downturn and Americans’ frustrations with their civic responsibilities have inspired many of the incidents, George said. The agency has stepped up enforcement efforts since Commissioner Douglas Shulman took over in 2008.

For Full Story