Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2019
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: bank robbers

FBI Searching for 2 Bank Robbers Disguised as Nuns in Pennsylvania

Two bank robbers dressed as nuns.

Two bank robbers dressed as nuns.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is on the hunt for two armed women who disguised themselves as nuns and tried to rob a bank in Pennsylvania on Monday.

The bureau said two Hispanic women, armed with handguns, concealed their faces by dressing as nuns in an attempt to rob a bank in Tannersville, Pa.

Police described the suspects are about 5-feet tall with a medium build.

The women demanded money from a teller but fled empty-handed.

Authorities warned that the women are armed and dangerous.

Why FBI Gives Bank Robbers Funny Nicknames

A robber dressed as Santa Claus robbed a metro Nashville bank.

A robber dressed as Santa Claus robbed a metro Nashville bank.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Ever wonder why the FBI gives bank robbers nicknames, like “Thug in a Rug,” “Snowbird Bandit,” and “Sabbatical Bandit?”

It’s quite simple, the FBI said.

“The Safe Streets Task Force comes up with nicknames for bank robbers, first of all, so we can internally refer to them easily,” Seattle FBI spokesperson Ayne Deitrich-Williams said. “There are a lot of bank robbers, and when somebody stands out with the same MO, then it’s easy to slap a name on them. In this case, somebody wearing a wig.”

“We also like to use the nickname when we talk to the public because we want something to stand out in the public’s mind,” she said. “If they are a witness to one of these robberies, they would know it’s not just any person acting suspiciously, it’s a known bank robber so pay attention to note any details.”

The FBI said it’s effective.

Ceremony Scheduled Today for 30th Anniversary of Bloody Florida Shootout with FBI

FBI agents Jerry L. Dove (left) and Benjamin P. Grogan were killed.

FBI agents Jerry L. Dove (left) and Benjamin P. Grogan were killed.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Today is the 30th anniversary of a bloody South Florida shootout that left two FBI agents dead and another five agents wounded.

The FBI will mark the anniversary today as Director James Comey plans to speak at a ceremony at the bureau’ office in Miramar, NBC2 reports. 

The shootout with bank robbers occurred in the Miami suburb of Pinecrest on April 11, 1986.

Agents Jerry L. Dove and Benjamin P. Grogan were killed, and so were the robber suspects, William Russell Matix and Michael Lee Platt.

The FBI agents found themselves inadequately armed to fight off the robbers’ heavy fire, prompting the bureau to begin using more powerful handguns.   

FBI, Local Police Track Down 1 of 3 Escaped Chicago Inmates

Steve  Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 A brazen jail escapee was arrested in Chicago Thursday without incident but a fellow inmate remains at large, the Huffington Post reports.

Joseph “Jose” Banks, 37, and Kenneth Conley made a daring escape from a high-rise jail in Chicago and hopped a taxi shortly before 3 a.m. Tuesday.

Local police and agents from the Chicago FBI’s Violent Task Force tracked down Banks at 11:30 p.m. but are still on the hunt for Conley, 38, the Huffington Post reports.

Both are serving time for bank robberies.

FBI Launched ‘Wanted Bank Robbers’ Website to Combat $38 Million in Annual Theft

 Steve Neavling
tickltethewire.com

Bank robbers bagged more than $38 million from banks last year, and the money was recovered in only one in five robberies.

To increase the success of nabbing thieves, the FBI has launched a website, Wanted Bank Robbers, at www.bankrobbers.fbi.gov. It’s dedicated to enlisting the public’s help in identifying suspects, the bureau announced on its site.

The site includes a gallery of suspects and a map of robberies.

All of the information can be searched by name, and location.

Retired FBI Agent Lester Davis Dies at Age 94

fbi logo large
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Retired FBI agent Lester G. Davis of Atlanta, who developed an impressive record for capturing bank robbers in the 1950s while working in New Orleans, died Saturday at age 94, according to an obituary in the  New Orleans Times-Picayune.

Lester’s career with the FBI spanned 32 years, starting in 1942. He retired in 1974, the obituary said.

In the late 1960’s he went off to work in Atlanta and he became a serious coin collector, the paper said.

FBI Stats Show Banks Robbers Prefer Fridays

bank-robberyBy Matt Castello
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Most Americans look forward to Friday, the gateway to the weekend. Bank robbers, it appears, are no different.

The FBI’s bank crime statistics released Wednesday for the first quarter of 2010 — January through March — shows 241 bank crimes occurred on Friday, more than any other day of the week. Bank crimes occurred most frequently, irrespective of the day, between 9 and 11 a.m, according to the FBI statistics.

There were 1,183 bank crimes reported to the FBI during 2010’s first quarter, a drop of slightly more than 22 percent during the same period in 2009. A bank crime includes a bank robbery, burglary, or larceny, but the lion’s share of crimes reported by the FBI involved bank robberies.

Read more »

America’s Love Affair With Some Serial Bank Robbers

"Geezer Bandit"/fbi photo

"Geezer Bandit"/fbi photo

By Matt Castello
ticklethewire.com

On the ever-popular Facebook, words of support, encouragement and disbelief plaster a wall with 2,700-plus followers dedicated to the elderly, ever-elusive San Diego bank robber dubbed the “Geezer Bandit”.

“This is the first time I’ve heard of this guy,” wrote one Facebook fan. “And he just became my personal hero.”

“Financial crisis in the US,” another admirer commented. “The old guy rips off banks. I would say totally understandable.”

Similarly, more than 93,000 Facebook users have joined one of the many pages dedicated to the nefarious activities of Colton Harris-Moore, aka the “Barefoot Bandit”, who was recently apprehended in the Bahamas.

The Geezer Bandit and the Barefoot Bandit are among the latest arrivals in a decades long phenomena — America’s selective love affair with serial bank robbers — an infatuation that took hold in the 1930s with such legends as Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger. Books have been written. Movies have been made.

“Fascination and hero-worship for undeserving criminals is a pathetic piece of our popular culture,” James Alan Fox, Lipman Family Professor of Criminology, Law and Public Policy at Northeastern recently wrote in a blog entry on boston.com. “All sorts of offenders, no matter how despicable their crimes, have been revered by a sizable minority of Americans.”

Read more »