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Tag: border crisis

Texas Gov. Rick Perry Said Humanitarian Crisis at Mexico Border is ‘Side Issue’

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The crippling influx of migrant children escaping violence in Central America is a “side issue” to tackling the wave of crime from undocumented immigrants, Texas Gov. Rick Perry said Sunday.

While most politicians in Washington expressed concerns about the 62,000 unaccompanied minors crossing the border, Perry said he is “substantially more concerned about” the criminals coming into the state.

“That’s the real issue here, and one that all too often gets deflected by the conversation about unaccompanied minor children,” Perry said on CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday.

Perry said last week that he plans to deploy up to 1,000 National Guard troops to “combat” crime.

“We’ll continue to do what we have to do to keep our citizens safe,” he said.

 

 

Texas Braces for Arrival of Hundreds of National Guard Troops Over Protests

Steve Neavling
ticklethwire.com

Not long from now, hundreds of Texas National Guard troops will descend on border towns in an unusual show of force.

The USA Today reports that some cities are welcoming the troops, who will arrive sporting camouflage and guns.

“If anything, [the guardsmen] will send a strong message that our border will be secure,” Rio Grande City Mayor Ruben Villarreal said. “We’ll have the manpower necessary to finally secure this area.”

Critics, including the federal government and state lawmakers, have said the troops’ presence could worsen the problem and even cause unnecessary deaths.

Gov. Rick Perry announced last week that he plans to bring in up to 1,000 troops.

 

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

USA Today Column: Tough Immigration Rules Backfire, Keeping Migrants Inside US or Locking Them Out

Alex Nowrasteh
USA Today

President Obama’s recent request for billions of dollars to address the surge in unaccompanied children across the U.S.-Mexico border has ignited fierce criticism. Republicans such as Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas blame Obama’s supposedly lax enforcement policies. Democrats blame the surge on a humanitarian crisis in Central America.

While both narratives bear some truth, both miss how our immigration restrictions and border enforcement have created the current mess.

Migration from Central America and Mexico used to be circular. Migrants would come for a season or a few years to work, move back home, then return to the USA when there was more work. This reigned from the 1920s to 1986, when Congress passed the more restrictive Immigration Reform and Control Act. Before 1986, when circular migration was in effect, 60% of unauthorized immigrants on their first trip here would eventually settle back in their home countries rather than in the United States, and 80% of undocumented immigrants who came back on a second trip eventually returned home.

Since 1986, the rate of return for first-time border crossers has fallen to almost zero. The return rate of second-time crossers has fallen to a mere 30%. What happened? In the mid-1980s, the government began spending massive resources to stop unauthorized immigrants from coming in the first place. By trying to keep them out, increases in border security locked them in.

To read more, click here.

National Guard Troops May Get Authority to Arrest Undocumented Immigrants in Texas

Tex. Gov. Rick Perry/official photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The 1,000 National Guard troops who were deployed by Texas Gov. Rick Perry to assist with the border crisis may get the unusual authority to make arrests and apprehensions, the New York Times reports.

In the past, troops who were sent by presidents were prohibited from making arrests while they helped at the border. But since Perry ordered the deployment, he has the authority to permit Guard troops to make arrests, the New York Times wrote.

Immigration rights advocates and experts on the National Guard expressed concern that troops were ill trained to handle potentially deadly encounters.
“This does not come from the federal government,” said Jayson P. Ahern, a former Customs and Border Protection acting commissioner who helped coordinate deployment of the National Guard to the border in 2006. “That’s the biggest distinction here. This is the governor taking unilateral action. Not having that oversight and supervision and direction as part of a plan from the federal authorities, I think it is reckless and could lead to significant safety issues.”

The troops are expected at the border next month but they cannot enforce immigration law.

Obama Administration to Assess Need for National Guard Troops at Texas-Mexico Border

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Obama administration is going explore the need for deploying National Guard troops to the Texas-Mexico border, the Washington Post reports. The administration has dispatched a team of military and national security officials to examine whether the Rio Grande Valley would benefit from a military “temporary assist.”

Despite objections from Democrats, Texas Gov. Rick Perry decided earlier this week to send 1,000 of his state’s National Guard troops to the border over the next month.

“The assessment team will review support options that increase U.S. Customs and Border Protection capacity to conduct enforcement and processing activities and to enable DHS to implement a surge plan that addresses spikes in the influx of UACs [unaccompanied alien children]/migrants along the Southwest Border,” a senior administration official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 

Texas Gov. Perry to Deploy National Guard Troops to Border Over Immigration Surge

Tex. Gov. Rick Perry/official photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is taking matters into his own hands and is reportedly planning to dispatch the Texas National Guard to the U.S. border to crack down on Central American immigrants, the Washington Post reports.

Perry plans to mobilize about 1,000 guardsman to the Rio Grand Valley.

“I won’t stand idly by while our citizens are under assault and little children from Central America are detained in squalor,” Perry said Monday in announcing the plan.

Many Republicans applauded the plan.

Democrats questioned the move, especially following a recent drop in the flood of immigrants coming to the U.S.

“They’re trained in warfare,” said Sheriff Omar Lucio of Cameron County, which borders Mexico. “I don’t know what they’re really going to be doing.”

Report: Obama Administration Ignored Warnings of Brewing Border Crisis

white house photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Nearly a year before a flood of unaccompanied children from Central America created a crisis along the border, the Obama administration was warned that the U.S. was not adequately prepared for such a situation, the Washington Post reports.

A team of Border Patrol agents was assigned to the Fort Brown patrol station in Brownsville, Tex., and was alarmed by the potential for problems.

This year, more than 57,000 Central American migrants were caught entering the U.S. illegally, and President Obama has declared a humanitarian crisis.

The administration could have better managed the problem had it acted soon, the Post found during interviews with experts and former government officials.

Victor Manjarrez Jr., a former Border Patrol station chief, said the crisis was “not on anyone’s radar” and was considered a “local problem.”

Opinion: U.S. Should Be More Careful About Deporting Central American Immigrants

istock photo

By Alan Gomez
USA Today

For the past few weeks, the attention of the White House and Congress has, rightfully, been on the tens of thousands of children from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador flooding across the U.S. border.

But as Washington debates the fastest and safest way to send those kids back home, it gives us a chance to rethink the way we’re deporting people to Mexico, too.

Border Patrol agents have wide latitude to determine where and when they deport someone caught trying to cross the border illegally. In many instances, they deport the person far from the location where they were caught — that hinders their ability to try to cross again, given they’re in an unfamiliar city and don’t have local connections to help.

But little thought has been given to their deportation destination, and data from both sides of the border indicate the government is sending people into some incredibly dangerous terrain.

Take Tijuana, for example. That area was once one of the most violent along the border, with drug cartels fighting a bloody battle for control of the region. But from 2008 to 2012, the city’s murder rate fell from 41 per 100,000 residents to 21,according to a study by the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute.

To read more click here.