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Tag: bradley manning

Column: Homeland Security Exposes Constitutional Loop Hole to Conduct Searches

Dale McFeatters
The Eagle-Tribune

The Founding Fathers valued privacy enough to specify in the Fourth Amendment that the people had the right to be secure against unreasonable searches and seizures unless a warrant was issued.

Among other items, they specified “papers.” In a rare moment of shortsightedness, they failed to specify laptops, cellphones and thumb drives. The feds, if they had any clue that these electronic devices might contain incriminating information, could of course go to court and obtain a warrant.

But the Department of Homeland Security has found a way around that constitutional technicality, as in the recent case of David House, who came to the feds’ attention for having raised funds for the defense of secrets-leaker Chelsea Manning, formerly Pfc. Bradley Manning. No telling what secrets House may have had, but it apparently wasn’t worth the hassle of going to court to find out.

Instead, according to the Associated Press: “U.S. agents quietly waited for months for House to leave the country, then seized his laptop, thumb drive, digital camera and cellphone when he re-entered the United States. They held his laptop for weeks before returning it, acknowledging one year later that House had committed no crime and promising to destroy copies the government made of House’s personal data.”

To read more click here.

Updated: U.S. Soldier Faces Up to Life in Prison for Release of 700,000 Classified Documents

Update: CNN reports that a military judge found Pfc. Bradley Manning not guilty of aiding the enemy, but guilty of most of the other charges.

 
Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, who is accused of the biggest leak of classified information in U.S. history, could be sentenced to life in prison today, Reuters reports.

A judge is expect to render a verdict in the case against Army Private First Class Manning, 25, who’s charged with aiding the enemy by releasing 700,000 classified documents to WikiLeaks.

Judge Colonel Denise Lind ruled that Manning was appropriately trained to understand that releasing the sensitive information put the U.S. at risk.

Others say the case is overblown.

“He’s just a dumb kid who got himself into a situation where he felt he was saving the world,” said Joseph Wippl, a professor of international relations at Boston University and a former CIA officer. “I think he should be convicted and they should be easy on him. They need to do more on limiting access to classified information.”

Investigators in WikiLeaks Case Targeted by Groups Online

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Investigators in the prosecution of Bradley Manning, the soldier accused of leaking top secret documents to WikiLeaks,  may face a backlash from activist hackers online, reports NextGov.com.

Gregg Housh,  an Internet activist who follows the pro-WikiLeaks hacking collective known as “Anonymous”, said there is talk in the chat rooms of  retaliating against people involved in the prosecution of Manning, who is currently sitting in on a military pretrial hearing to determine whether he should face a court martial.

Housh said the talk in particular is focused in on retaliating against a government-hired forensics specialist and an investigator from the Army .

“Both are being talked about pretty heavily as possibly problems that need to be dealt with,” said Housh, according to NextGov.

To read more click here.