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Tag: cellphone

Secret Service Officer Assigned to White House Charged with Sending Nude Photo to Teen

secret serviceBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 37-year-old Secret Service officer assigned to the White House is accused of sending a picture of his genitals to a detective masquerading as a 14-year-old girl in Delaware, The USA Today reports.

Lee Robert Monroe, of Church Hill, Md., is facing state and federal charges after investigators said he used a cellphone social media app to send the naked photo and try to set up a meeting.

Some of the communication occurred as Monroe was working in the uniformed division of the Secret Service, according to a criminal complaint filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Delaware.

Moore is charged in federal court with attempted transfer of obscene material to a minor. He also faces two state charges of soliciting a minor for sex and one count of obscenity material provided to a minor.

Secret Service Permitted to Track Cell Phones without Warrant from a Judge

cellphone-tower-photo2By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

In the event of a nonspecific threat to a president or someone else under protection, the Secret Service won’t be required to get a warrant to use cellphone-tracking technology, the Associated Press reports. 

A House subcommittee learned about the new policy from Homeland Security Assistant Secretary Seth M. Stodder.

The devices, known as Stingrays, have been criticized by civil libertarians and privacy advocates as too intrusive.

The Justice Department introduced a similar policy in September. That policy includes the FBI.

Federal law requires authorities to get a signed warrant from a judge before using Stringrays, but exceptions have been made for “exigent circumstances.”

Critics: FBI Violates Federal Law with Cell Phone Tracking Technology

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

New records show the FBI is using a controversial cell phone tracking technology that dupes phones into using a fake network, Slate reports. The idea is to track the movements of suspects in real time, Slate reported. But communication is not intercepted.

The technology, called “Stingray,” is controversial because it collects data from the phones of innocent bystanders and can interrupt phone service.

Critics charge that the practice violates federal communications law, Slate wrote.

“There are clearly concerns, even within the agency, that the use of Stingray technology might be inconsistent with current regulations,” says attorney Alan Butler, of the Electric Privacy Information Center. “I don’t know how the DOJ justifies the use of Stingrays given the limitations of the Communications Act prohibition.”

Three Men Accused of Stealing Weapons from FBI Agent’s Car in Mississippi

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Chances are when you break in to an FBI agent’s government issued car you’re not going to get away with it. Agents have a tendency to really want to find the missing equipment, particularly when it involves guns.

The Associated Press reported that three men have been charged with stealing or possessing guns and other equipment swiped from an agent’s car in front of his house in Hattiesburg, Miss.

AP reported that Cameron Undrae Eatmon, 19, is charged with breaking into the car n June 6, and stealing a submachine gun, an assault rifle, a shotgun and other equipment.

Authorities say Christopher Ryan Burkett, 18, took a cellphone photo of the weapons and tried to sell them via text message.

Then a suspected gang member Glenn Eddie Gholar allegedly bought an M16 assault rifle and a shotgun for $120 and an ounce of marijuana, AP reported.

 

Law Enforcement’s Use of Cell Phone Tracker Device Fuels Constitutional Debate

By JENNIFER VALENTINO-DEVRIES
Wall Street Journal

For more than a year, federal authorities pursued a man they called simply “the Hacker.” Only after using a little known cellphone-tracking device—a stingray—were they able to zero in on a California home and make the arrest.

Stingrays are designed to locate a mobile phone even when it’s not being used to make a call. The Federal Bureau of Investigation considers the devices to be so critical that it has a policy of deleting the data gathered in their use, mainly to keep suspects in the dark about their capabilities, an FBI official told The Wall Street Journal in response to inquiries.

A stingray’s role in nabbing the alleged “Hacker”—Daniel David Rigmaiden—is shaping up as a possible test of the legal standards for using these devices in investigations.

The FBI says it obtains appropriate court approval to use the device. Stingrays are one of several new technologies used by law enforcement to track people’s locations, often without a search warrant. These techniques are driving a constitutional debate about whether the Fourth Amendment, which prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures, but which was written before the digital age, is keeping pace with the times.

To read more click here.

 

ACLU Sues Govt. To Stop Laptop and Cellphone Searches at Border Without Suspicion of Wrongdoing

laptopBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The ACLU is fighting a practice by federal authorities, who routinely search laptops and cells phones at border crossings.

The New York Daily News reports that the ACLU on Tuesday filed a lawsuit in Brooklyn federal court challenging the policy.

The lawsuit contends that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security routinely conducts the searches without suspicion of wrongdoing, and sometimes transfers data out of the devices,  the Daily News reported.

“Innocent Americans should not be made to feel like the personal information they store on their laptops and cell phones is vulnerable to searches by government officials any time they travel out of the country,” said Catherine Crump of the American Civil Liberties Union, according to the Daily News.

To read more click here.