best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

December 2017
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Central America

Border Patrol Fails at Meetings Its Goal of Hiring 1,600 Women as Agents

border patrolBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Border Patrol has struggled to hire female agents to help fight illegal immigration.

Between October 2014 and September 2015, the federal agency received more than 6,200 applications for Border Patrol job vacancies. But according to the Albuquerque Journal, only 54 women where fired – far below the goal of hiring 1,600 female agents. 

Women are vital to the Border Patrol because of the influx of Central American women and children immigrants over the past two years. The agency has said female agents are often better equipped to deal with immigrants who are women and children.

Women represent about 15% of the workforce in federal law enforcement agencies. But only 5% of Border Patrol’s agents are women.

“They are working hard,” WIFLE executive director Cathy Sanz, a retired agent of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said of Border Patrol. “They are trying. Other federal agencies are watching what they are doing” – i.e., looking for signs of success in attracting women to the force – “because others are thinking they might want to go down this road.”

Illegal Immigration This Year Already Exceeds Totals from Last Year

Border Fence along Mexico and the U.S.

Border Fence along Mexico and the U.S.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The number of undocumented immigrants sneaking into the U.S. this year has already surpassed 2015 with two months until the fiscal year ends, the Washington Times reports. 

During the first 10 months of the fiscal year, more than 332,000 people were caught at the border, exceeding last year’s numbers.

Federal authorities report a renewed interest in crossing the border, especially among children and families from Central America. The increase apparently has been spurred by violence at home and hopes of being granted amnesty.

“Overall apprehensions by the Border Patrol in July along our southwest border — an indicator of total attempts to cross the border illegally — fell during the month of July, although apprehensions of unaccompanied children and family units increased somewhat from June. These trends are generally in line with seasonal patterns we have observed in previous years,” U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Homeland Security agency that oversees the Border Patrol, said in releasing the numbers.

Homeland Security Readies for Raid to Deport Hundreds of Central American Families

homeland2department-of-homeland-security-logo-300x300By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Homeland Security is preparing for a series of raids that involve deporting hundred of families who fled to the United States since the beginning of 2014, the Washington Post reports. 

As early as January, ICE agents will embark on its first large-scale deportation of families who came from violence-torn Central America.

The deportation targets adults and children who already have been ordered removed from the U.S. by an immigration judge.

At least hundreds of immigrants will be targeted.

“It would be an outrage if the administration subjected Central American families to even more aggressive enforcement tactics,” said Gregory Chen, director of advocacy for the American Immigration Lawyers Association. “This administration has never acknowledged the truth: that these families are refugees seeking asylum who should be given humanitarian protection rather than being detained or rounded up. When other countries are welcoming far more refugees, the U.S. should be ashamed for using jails and even contemplating large-scale deportation tactics.”

U.S. Apprehends More Migrants Who Live Outside Mexico Than Live In Border Country

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

In a dramatic shift, more migrants from countries outside of Mexico were captured crossing into the U.S., which hasn’t been seen for at least two decades, the New York Times reports. 

The annual figures published by Homeland Security show a 15% rise in total apprehensions in the 2014 fiscal year, with a total of 486,651 caught. More than 250,000 of them were not Mexican, a 68% spike over the previous year.

The increase was fueled by the surge last summer of migrants from Central America.

While Mexicans continue to cross the border more than others, the apprehension of 229,178 people last year represents a 14% decline this year.

The report also found that ICE is handling fewer deportations.

Other Stories of Interest


Number of Migrant Children, Families Crossing into U.S. Declines Sharply

istock photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The number of migrant children and families from Central American crossing the border in the U.S. has dropped significantly since the crisis this summer, the Arizona Republic reports.

The number of crossings have dropped to the lowest level this year, Customs and Border Protection said.

The crossings peaked in June but began to fell because of the media attention.

In September, agents apprehended 2,402 unaccompanied children, compared to 10,622 in June. That’s a 77% decline.

The number of families taken into custody also declined sharply.

US Sees Fewer Undocumented Central American Children Crossing Border

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The number of unaccompanied children crossing the U.S. border in South Texas has declined over the past 10 days, authorities said.

That’s good news for an agency that has become overwhelmed by a surge of children entering the country without their parents, Fox New reports.

Since October, federal authorities have arrested more than 57,000 undocumented children.

Border Patrol also converted a 55,000-square-foot warehouse to temporarily house up to 1,000 children.

“We arrested 80 juveniles yesterday, so within the last 10 days we’ve seen a decrease in the number of juveniles arrested,” Border Patrol’s Rio Grande Valley sector Chief Kevin Oaks

The Los Angeles Times toured the facility in McAllen, Texas, where squalid, cramped conditions were reported earlier in the month because of the immigration surge from Central America.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Opinion: U.S. Should Be More Careful About Deporting Central American Immigrants

istock photo

By Alan Gomez
USA Today

For the past few weeks, the attention of the White House and Congress has, rightfully, been on the tens of thousands of children from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador flooding across the U.S. border.

But as Washington debates the fastest and safest way to send those kids back home, it gives us a chance to rethink the way we’re deporting people to Mexico, too.

Border Patrol agents have wide latitude to determine where and when they deport someone caught trying to cross the border illegally. In many instances, they deport the person far from the location where they were caught — that hinders their ability to try to cross again, given they’re in an unfamiliar city and don’t have local connections to help.

But little thought has been given to their deportation destination, and data from both sides of the border indicate the government is sending people into some incredibly dangerous terrain.

Take Tijuana, for example. That area was once one of the most violent along the border, with drug cartels fighting a bloody battle for control of the region. But from 2008 to 2012, the city’s murder rate fell from 41 per 100,000 residents to 21,according to a study by the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute.

To read more click here.

Justice Department Highlights New Immigration Strategy in Wake of Border Crisis

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department launched a two-pronged approach to addressing the surge of illegal immigration from Central America, the Washington Examiner reports.

The plan aims to help Central American governments address the growing humanitarian crisis and to speed up immigration cases.

The Executive Office for Immigration Review will prioritize cases involving immigrants who recently crossed the border and are facing removal proceedings.

“This refocusing of resources will allow EOIR to prioritize the adjudication of the cases of those individuals involved in the evolving situation on the southwest border.” EOIR Director Juan P. Osuna said.

The plan calls for hiring more immigration judges and expanding access to legal resources for people facing removal proceedings.