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Tag: collective bargaining

Border Patrol Union: Agency Violated Guidelines with Ban on Agents’ Cell Phones

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Border Patrol’s ban on bringing cell phones or electronic devices to work following the leaked photos of an overcrowded processing center in Texas violates collectively-bargained guidelines, a union representative insists.

The Blaze.com reports that the agency also is threatening employees who speak to the media.

Prior to the release of photos at the Nogales center, agents were allowed to bring cell phones to work in case radio communications shut down.
Shawn Moran, spokesman for the National Border Patrol Council, said a patrol agent in charge doesn’t have the authority to to ban cell phones. That responsibility lies with the sector chief.

“If the Tucson local feels there’s a violation of our collective bargaining agreement then they can file the appropriate grievance,” Moran told TheBlaze. “If there’s a violation I hope they do, our locals are not afraid to litigate these matters.”

A Dec. 2, 2008 memo to all station chiefs states that the “policy does not prohibit personal wireless communication devices while performing official duties, but limits the usage.”

Column: Will Republicans Embarrass Themselves With John Pistole Nomination for TSA?

Chris Battle

Chris Battle

Chris Battle is a former official at Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and DEA. He is currently managing partner of the Adfero Group Homeland Security Practice, a Washington public relations firm.

By Chris Battle
Security DeBrief

WASHINGTON — Will John Pistole, the FBI deputy director nominated to lead the TSA, go the way of the previous two nominees?

Let’s hope not, but it all depends upon whether certain Republicans intend to embarrass themselves – again – by demanding answers from Pistole that he simply will not be in a position to answer. I am speaking here of the unionization issue.

Don’t get me wrong. I am no friend of unions. I was delighted to watch the internal combustion that occurred when the unions sunk millions into the Arkansas Senate election in an effort to hand pick a pro-union candidate.

To read full column click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

FBI’s John Pistole Likely to Get Grilled on Collective Bargaining as TSA Nominee

John Pistole/fbi photo

John Pistole/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — John S. Pistole, the FBI’s second in command, who has been nominated to head the Transportation Security Administration, is expected to get grilled Thursday on his views about collective bargaining rights for TSA employees, the Washington Post reports.

Pistole is scheduled to go before a Senate nomination hearing and is likely to get some tough questions from those like Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), who oppose collective bargaining for TSA employees  on the grounds that it would make the agency less flexible and potentially compromise security, the Post’s Federal Diary Columnist Joe Davidson reports. Union leaders call the concerns nonsense.

Davidson writes that Pistole “is unlikely to give them much of an answer” on the collective bargaining issues. The two previous nominees, who eventually withdrew their names,  gave Senators vague answers about the thorny issue.

To read more click here.

TSA Still Waiting For Collective Bargaining

Morale is low, attrition is high. It’s clear collective bargaining would help improve things over at the Transportation Security Administration, which overseas the security of our airports. The Obama administration needs to address this sooner than later. 

By Steve Vogel
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON tsa— Border Patrol agents can do it. So can federal protective officers and U.S. Capitol Police. But Transportation Security Administration officers, who screen passengers at airports across the country, are not allowed to engage in collective bargaining.

The unions representing TSA employees say that one result is the agency has the lowest morale and highest attrition rate of all federal agencies, and that they are eager to see change.

They have the backing of President Obama, who promised on the campaign trail that collective bargaining and workplace protections “will be a priority” for his administration. “It is unacceptable for TSOs to work under unfair rules and without workplace protections — this makes it more difficult for them to perform their jobs,” Obama wrote in a letter to the American Federation of Government Employees in October. “Since 2001, TSA has had the unfettered ability to deny its workforce even the most basic labor rights and protections.”

So far, no changes have been made. The legislation that established the agency after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, states that the decision on whether to allow collective bargaining rests with the TSA administrator.