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Tag: Colombian

Ex-soldiers Plotted to kill DEA Agent, Traffic Cocaine

By Selim Algar
New York Post

They’re real-life Rambos gone bad.

A squadron of former elite military personnel from the US and Germany plotted to assassinate a DEA agent and an informant — both undercover agents – who were interfering with a cocaine distribution ring, according to a Manhattan federal court indictment released Friday.

Led by former US Army Sgt. Joseph “Rambo” Hunter, the international crew of veteran snipers and ex-counter-intelligence officers formed a security detail and hit squad for a supposed crew of heavyweight Colombian drug smugglers, who were working with authorities, the feds said.

In meetings held from Asia to Africa, the fearsome unit was caught on surveillance casually discussing killing the DEA agent and informant and similar executions they had coldly committed in the past.

To read the full story click here.

One of “World’s Most Significant Drug Kingpins” Gets 30 Years in NY

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Colombian drug lord Francisco Gonzalez Uribe, designated by the Justice Department as one of “the world’s most significant drug kingpins”, was sentenced Tuesday in U.S. District Court in New York to 30 years in prison, authorities announced.

Gonzalez Uribe, 44, was arrested in 2009 in the Dominican Republic and pleaded guilty to drug charges in June.

“In the international drug trafficking underworld, Gonzalez Uribe was almost peerless,” said U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara. “Today’s sentence should send a strong message to narcotics dealers around the world that if you try to smuggle drugs into our country, we will find you and prosecute you with the full force of our laws.”

Authorities charged that from at least 2007 through 2009, he headed an organization that shipped thousands of kilograms of cocaine and heroin to countries like Mexico, the Dominican Republic and Venezuela.

The drug then went to the U.S. and Europe.

During the probe, the DEA seized larges quantities of drugs. Recorded phone calls also showed he had been trying to obtain a number of large planes, including a

DC-8 jumbo jet, to ship large quantities of drugs, authorities said.

Drug Cartels Operate Freely in Small Calif. Towns

In these small little towns in California, not only are some of the politicians extremely corrupt, but they’ve become places where gangs and Mexican and Colombian drug cartels operate freely.  Investigative reporter Jeffrey Anderson examines the problem.
CALIFornia map
By Jeffrey Anderson
Washington Times

BELL, Calif. —  The gang graffiti that coats freeway overpasses, exit signs and the concrete banks of the Los Angeles River attests to a problem more alarming than the recent revelations of hundreds of thousands of dollars in annual salaries for public officials.

Street gangs, a powerful prison gang known as the Mexican Mafia and even more powerful drug-trafficking organizations based in Mexico and Colombia operate freely in this small city and the similarly sized cities surrounding it.

News reports in recent weeks have focused on three Bell city officials who resigned on July 26 amid revelations that they were being paid up to $800,000 per year in a city of 36,000 where the average annual household income is less than $40,000. California Attorney General Jerry Brown on Monday announced that he issued subpoenas to current and former members of Bell’s city government, adding that his office also is investigating allegations of “possible illegal election conduct by Bell officials.”

To read full story click here.

Colombian Drug Trafficker Extradited From Mexico to U.S.

Mexico border mapBy Matt Castello
ticklethewire.com

A man who represented the interests of a major Colombian drug cartel in Mexico, has been extradited to New York to stand trial, authorities said.

Pedro Antonio Bermudez, known as “El Arquitecto,” was arrested in Mexico City on Oct. 2, 2008 and remained in Mexican custody until his extradition to the U.S. on Tuesday, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. He was arraigned in federal court in Brooklyn on Wednesday.

Bermudez’s  job was to ensure that cocaine sent to Mexico by the Colombian drug cartel Norte del Valle, was safely delivered to the Mexican cartels, authorities said.

Since 1990, the Norte del Valle Cartel allegedly exported more than 1.2 million pounds of cocaine — worth more than $10 billion — to the U.S., most of which came through Mexico, the U.S. Attorney’s office said.

The Colombian shipments were sent by Luis Hernando Gomez Bustamante, one of the leaders of the Norte del Valle Cartel, who pleaded guilty in New York in 2008 to charges including murder and narcotics trafficking.  Bustamante, who was extradited to the U.S. in 2007, is awaiting sentencing.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Fla. Woman Wants Husband Dead: Hires Wrong Hitman

hitman-gun1By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

All is not always fair or safe in love and war.

The FBI arrested a Florida woman on Monday with trying to hire a hitman to kill her ex-husband, who helped put her behind bars in a major drug-money laundering case, the Ft. Lauderdale Sun Sentinel reported.

Mercedes Morales, 57, of Miramar, Fla. allegedly gave a $5,000 diamond ring as a down payment to the hit man to kill her 45-year-old husband Fred Coral.

Only thing was, the hitman was actually working undercover with the FBI, the paper reported.

The paper reported that she was convicted in 2003 for being a courier for a Florida organization that laundered Colombian drug cartel cash. She was released in 2005.

Her husband, who cooperated with the feds, was also charged but never served time, the paper reported.

Feds in Texas Indict 25 Suspected Members of Colombian Drug Cartel

colombia
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

In recent years, the spotlight has turned to the violent Mexican drug cartels shipping drugs into the U.S.

But on Friday, U.S. Attorney John M. Bales in Dallas announced the indictment of 25 suspected members of a Colombian drug cartel that moved massive amounts of cocaine into the U.S. through Mexico and Central America.

Authorities said the probe, to date, had resulted in the seizure of 7.5 tons of cocaine and $4.25 million in assets.

All 25 defendants are Colombian, and 21 are currently being detained in that country.

“In this operation, the agents, both American and Colombian, are literally reaching across hemispheres to strike a blow against a criminal organization that is a vital lifeline to several Mexican drug cartels,” the U.S. Attorney said.

Feds Nab Big Fish in Violent Colombian Cartel

Authorities nabbed a major fish in the drug war. The question is: Will it have any impact on cocaine traffic in the U.S.?

By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer
MIAMI — The reputed kingpin of a violent Colombian cartel blamed for smuggling cocaine worth $10 billion to the U.S. was flown aboard an FBI plane to Miami on Friday to face a 12-count federal indictment.
Diego “Don Diego” Montoya, described as the notorious head of the North Valley Cartel, could spend at least 20 years in prison if convicted on charges of drug trafficking, money laundering, obstruction of justice and witness retaliation by murder.
Montoya, who did not yet have a U.S. lawyer following his extradition, was being held without bail awaiting an initial court appearance Monday.
Under Montoya’s leadership, the North Valley Cartel in the mid-1990s become Colombia’s dominant cocaine smuggling organization, taking over from the Cali cartel whose leaders also were prosecuted in Miami. At its height, North Valley controlled about 60 percent of Colombia’s cocaine trade, authorities said.
For Full Story

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