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Tag: cybercrime

British Man Accused of Hacking FBI, Others, Fears He ‘May Die’ in Prison

hacker-artBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A British man accused of stealing huge amounts of data and hacking into the FBI, NASA and America’s Federal Reserve fears he “may die” in a U.S. jail.

Lauri Love, 31, faces up to 99 years in prison after U.S. officials agreed to his extradition to America, the Mirror reports. 

“I don’t think much of my future life prospects,” Love said. “I face decades and decades behind bars and at worst I may die.

“We were kind of expecting this but it’s still a disappointment and a kick in the gut. I’ve got to watch my mental health now and make sure I have support. We will put as much as we can into the appeal.”

Love hopes to appeal.

FBI Helps Bangladesh Investigate Massive $81M Cyberheist, Kidnapping of Crime Expert

BangladeshBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is helping Bangladesh investigate a massive heist by hackers who stole $81 million from the country’s central bank last month.

The stolen money was funneled to casino in the Philippines by hackers from six different countries, Time reports. 

“This is the biggest transnational organized crime ever seen in Bangladesh and so we sought both technical and human assistance [from the FBI],” Mirza Abdullahel Baqui, a senior police official, told Reuters.

The theft escalated after one of the country’s leading cybercrime experts, Tanvir Hassan Zoha, was kidnapped while helping investigating the case.

“This is a wake-up call,” former central bank governor Mohammad Farashuddin said.

Before Zoha was kidnapped, he had told the media he identified three of the user IDs involved in the heist – one of the world’s largest.

FBI, Interpol to Work Closely Together to Crack Down on Terrorism, Cybercrime

interpolBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

In an effort to crack down on global terrorism and cybercrime, the FBI and Interpol plan to work closer together.

The announcement was made last week after FBI Director James Comey met with Interpol Secretary General Jurgen Stock in France, Occupational Health and Safety reports.

“International partnerships remain critical as we work to keep our nations safe from crime,” Comey said. “Recent events underscore the pervasive nature of international terrorism and the increased need to share information. Interpol plays a crucial role by ensuring law enforcement agencies have access to real-time intelligence, which assists in identifying and countering common threats in order to protect those we serve.”

Stock applauded the international cooperation.

“As we face an ever-increasing range and scope of crime and terror threats, international cooperation between law enforcement agencies has never been so important,” Stock said. “Interpol plays a unique role in assisting police in each of our 190 member countries to identify and share intelligence leads, bridge information gaps, and disrupt the organized networks behind a range of crimes which are often interlinked. However, this is not possible without the support and input from agencies such as the FBI, and I look forward to our working even more closely in the future to the benefit of the global law enforcement community and citizens worldwide.”

FBI Faces Enormous Hurdles in Crackdown Against Proliferation of Hackers

Data securityBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Cyber security experts are facing incredible hurdles as they try to crack down on an increasing number of hackers worldwide.

Business Insider reports that the underground market for cybercrime is thriving and includes a range of people from experts to amateurs. Complicating the effort are the myriad barriers to overcome, including extradition, when conducting global investigations.

Hackers are from all over the world, and many are sophisticated crime rings.

“We need to know that the criminal is in a territory that we can do the arrest or that we know that some of the criminal infrastructure we’re going to disrupt is in a territory that we can exercise jurisdiction,” said Ilias Chantzos, senior director of government affairs EMEA at Symantec. “Some of it will not be there and we need to accept that so often the effectiveness will be as good as it possibly can be.”

Also complicating the effort is getting enough cyber security employees. A recent report found that the FBI was struggling to fill job openings because of relatively low pay and the thorough background checks.

Bill Would Give FBI More Resources to Fight Online Harassment

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The U.S. House of Representatives is considering a bill that would give the FBI more  resources to tackle cybercrime, especially online harassment, the Washington Post reports.

The bill by Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., would give the FBI 10 new agents whose sole jobs would be tackling threats made online. They would investigate stalkers and people who threaten violence.

Clark said online threats are increasing to alarming rates.

“While these threats may occur on the Internet, their impacts are far from virtual,” Clark told The Post. “They affect the bottom line for victims, who pay a real cost not just emotionally but also financially —  in fees to attorneys and private investigators, or to services to scrub personally identifying information from the Web. I don’t think that women, who are the primary targets of this kind of abuse, should have to do this alone.”

Homeland Security Chairman: Espionage Motivates China to Hack U.S.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Evidence n0t only points to China as the culprit behind “the most significant breach in U.S. History,” but the hackers may have been sponsored by the Chinese government, The Hill reports. 

House Homeland Security Chairman Michael McCaul, R-Texas, said all indications are that hackers were motivated espionage because of the target, the Office of Personnel Management.

It’s not only looking very likely that someone located in China hacked the U.S.

“It was perhaps nation-state sponsored because of the way it was done,” he said. “It was done for espionage.”

“This is an area where there are no rules to the game,” McCaul added. “It raises all sorts of issues for Americans.”

Other Stories of Interest


FBI, Newly Formed International Task Force Score Early Victory Against Hackers

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An international task force created last year to combat cyber crimes scored an early victory this week, shutting down malicious servers that had infected at least 10,000 machines, mostly in the U.S., The CBS News reports.

The new Joint Cybercrime Action Taskforce, which is collaborative effort with the FBI, Europol  and other law enforcement agencies worldwide, managed to pull the plug on the Beebone botnet quickly.

FBI Assistant Director for Cyber Joseph Demarest, Jr. said, “Botnets like Beebone have victimized users worldwide, which is why a global law enforcement team approach working with the private sector is so important. The FBI is proud to join with our partners at Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre, the Joint Cybercrime Action Taskforce (J-CAT), and the Dutch National High Tech Crime Unite to defeat malicious botnets that have the potential to impact thousands.”

The botnet infected computers by acting as a downloader, installing malicious software onto victims’ computers.

Justice Department Says It Has Mastermind in Prolific Cyber Attacks That Robbed Consumers, Businesses

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The Justice Department boasted Monday that it captured one of the most prolific cyber criminals in the world in the continuing effort to crack down on the evolving cybercrime threat, the Associated Press reports.

Federal officials said 30-year-old Evgeniy Bogachev of Russia was the ringleader of a band of backers who infected hundreds of thousand of computers worldwide and stole more than $100 million from consumers and businesses.

As part of the scheme, the attackers implanted computers with malicious software to collect bank account numbers and passwords. The hackers also seized personal information like pictures and files from computers and only agreed to return control to users when they paid several hundred dollars in ransom.

Federal officials are working with Russia to bring U.S. charges against Bogachev.