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Tag: Darrell Foxworth

An FBI Raid, a Suicide Kit and Egg on the Face of an Oregon Police Department

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Ooops.

The oops began when the FBI in San Diego notified the Springfield, Or. cops that a man in that community had purchased a suicide kit from a 91-year-old retired science teacher in California.

The FBI had raided the California woman’s home four months ago and then started — although belatedly — notifying police departments around the country about customers who had purchased the kit, Reuters news service reported.

On Tuesday, the Oregon police department stormed the home of a customer, and busted down the door in an attempt to save the person’s life.

Well, turns out that the home belonged to a copy editor at the Register-Guard newspaper who had purchased the homemade kit for a reporter working on a story about the issue.

Reuters reported that the copy editor wasn’t home at the time and the do-it-yourself asphyxiation package purchased seven months ago was in the reporter’s desk drawer.

Reuters reported that police apologized for the intrusion. Police explained that they had knocked the down the door thinking the man might be in danger of killing himself.

“We’re going to fix the door,” Springfield police sergeant John Umenhofer said, according to Reuters. “But we always err of the side of going in, if there is a question of safety.”

Reuters reports that San Diego FBI spokesman in San Diego Darrell Foxworth conceded that there was a four month lapse between the time the FBI raided the California woman’s home and notified the Springfield, Or., department. He said it took time to review the California woman’s records and get the word to local authorities.

 

America’s Love Affair With Some Serial Bank Robbers

"Geezer Bandit"/fbi photo

"Geezer Bandit"/fbi photo

By Matt Castello
ticklethewire.com

On the ever-popular Facebook, words of support, encouragement and disbelief plaster a wall with 2,700-plus followers dedicated to the elderly, ever-elusive San Diego bank robber dubbed the “Geezer Bandit”.

“This is the first time I’ve heard of this guy,” wrote one Facebook fan. “And he just became my personal hero.”

“Financial crisis in the US,” another admirer commented. “The old guy rips off banks. I would say totally understandable.”

Similarly, more than 93,000 Facebook users have joined one of the many pages dedicated to the nefarious activities of Colton Harris-Moore, aka the “Barefoot Bandit”, who was recently apprehended in the Bahamas.

The Geezer Bandit and the Barefoot Bandit are among the latest arrivals in a decades long phenomena — America’s selective love affair with serial bank robbers — an infatuation that took hold in the 1930s with such legends as Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger. Books have been written. Movies have been made.

“Fascination and hero-worship for undeserving criminals is a pathetic piece of our popular culture,” James Alan Fox, Lipman Family Professor of Criminology, Law and Public Policy at Northeastern recently wrote in a blog entry on boston.com. “All sorts of offenders, no matter how despicable their crimes, have been revered by a sizable minority of Americans.”

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