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Tag: DEA

Former DEA Task Force Member Indicted for Allegedly Stealing Cash, Drugs

DEALetterHatBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A veteran narcotics officer who was member of a DEA task force in New Orleans has been indicted on federal charges of allegedly stealing drugs and seized cash.

The Advocate reports that former Tangipahoa Parish Sheriff’s Office Deputy Karl E. Newman is the second member of the DEA task force to charged criminally.

Newman’s attorney declined to comment on the case.

Newman has been in jail since May 13 on a federal detainer.

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Mexican Drug Lord Denies Killing DEA Agent Enrique Camarena in 1985

Former Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero.

Former Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero denied killing DEA Agent Enrique Camarena in 1985 and said he did not try to seize control of the Sinaloa drug cartel.

Caro Quintero, a fugitive from justice since 2013, made the statements to Proceco magazine, reports Fox News. 

Quintero was released from prison on Aug. 9, 2013 after a judge dismissed charges against him, and disappeared soon after.

“I didn’t kidnap him, didn’t torture him and didn’t kill him,” the founder of the Guadalajara drug cartel said, referring to the DEA agent.

Caro Quintero said he was “in the wrong place” when the agent was killed.

Caro Quintero said he wants peace and “forgiveness of Mexican society.”

DEA Warns of Pills Laced with Deadly Opioid in American Market

pillsBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA is bracing for overdoses after warning that hundreds of thousands of counterfeit prescription pills are laced with a potentially deadly synthetic opioid.

The DEA said the drugs, which look like legitimate painkillers, have infiltrated the U.S. drug market, the Guardian reports. 

The pills contain fentanyl, which is 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine.

The DEA warned that only a small amount can kill.

“It’s a huge concern. People don’t know what they are getting,” said the DEA spokesman Melvin Patterson, citing an uptick in accidental overdoses by unwitting users.

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Former DEA Task Force Officer Found Guilty of Conspiring to Steal 15 Kilograms of Cocaine

Cocaine-jpgBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A jury found guilty a former DEA task force officer who conspired to steal nearly 15 kilograms of cocaine before staging a seizure to conceal the theft, MySA.com reports.

Hector “Jojo” Mendez, 46, was convicted after a jury deliberated for just three hours Thursday.

According to prosecutors, Mendez and a government informant agreed to cut the cocaine and then repackage it for a staged seizure.

During the trial, witnesses and federal prosecutor said he concealed information about the DEA seizure and lied to judges in sworn court filings.

He faces between 10 years and life in prison when he is sentenced in late September.

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Judge: DEA May Not Track Cell Phones without a Warrant

courtroomBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A federal judge delivered a major blow to the DEA’s use of Stingrays, which enable law enforcement to collect evidence by using fake phone masts.

U.S, District Court Judge William Pauley III said the use of Stingrays would violate the Fourth Amendment unless a warrant is granted, the Register reports. 

The decision comes after a Maryland judge made the same ruling in 2015.

“Absent a search warrant, the Government may not turn a citizen’s cell phone into a tracking device,” the judge said.

Stingrays enable authorities to listen to conversations and access information on phones.

Other Stories of Interest

 

DEA Not Surprised After 17 Heroin Overdoses in Akron, Ohio in 24 Hours

800px-HeroinBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Heroin continues to claim lives at unprecedented rates.

In the city of Akron, Ohio, 17 people overdosed on heroin, and one died, in a 24-hour period, WWJ reports.

Special Agent Rich Isaacson, of the DEA’s Detroit field division, said the trend is startling.

“It’s a huge problem in Akron, Ohio but it’s also a huge problem across the United States,” said Issacson. “There is not a community in southeast Michigan that hasn’t been hit hard by the opiate abuse problems, that’s including pain killers, like hydrcodone and oxycodone products as well as heroin.”

Isaacson said news of deaths don’t usually stop users.

“On occasion when there’s talk of heroin overdose deaths – or a series of heroin overdose deaths; sometimes as counter-intuitive as it sounds – that actually sounds attractive to a heroin addict because they know that if that heroin caused the death of another user, that must have been pretty strong heroin,” Issacson said.

The heroin epidemic is being blamed on the ubiquity of pain medicine.

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DEA Has New One-Strike Policy for Agents Who Solicit Prostitutes

DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg.

DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA is cracking down on sexual misconduct by its agents by instituting a one-strike policy for agents who solicit prostitutes, even if they are off duty.

The Washington Times reports the DEA also will release an internal report on employees’ bad actions and the punishments they’ve received.

“Solicitation of prostitution on duty or off duty, whether you’re in a jurisdiction where it is legal or illegal, first time offense — removal,” DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg said.

In 2012, the DEA discovered that some of its agents had hired prostitutes in Columbia while preparing for President Obama’s visit.

What DEA Should Do with Marijuana As Agency Considers Reclassifying Marijuana

Photo by Steve Neavling.

Photo by Steve Neavling.

By Tom Downey
Denver Post

This summer may be a big moment in the national conversation about marijuana. With a decision coming by July 1, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency could partially legalize medical marijuana, and the federal government could usher in a new era with a comprehensive and multi-structural approach to pot policy. Just don’t expect to fill a marijuana brownie prescription at your local drug store any time soon.

Marijuana has been a Schedule I narcotic since 1970.  That means, in the eyes of the federal government, marijuana has no medicinal value and is highly addictive.  It is illegal under federal law to grow, possess or sell it.  To put this in perspective, cocaine is a Schedule II narcotic — legally available under highly restrictive circumstances.  The DEA’s options are to keep marijuana as Schedule I or to reschedule or de-schedule it. De-scheduling would allow use for non-medical, recreational purposes like alcohol.  Rescheduling would allow use like a regular prescription issued by a physician and filled by a pharmacy under a DEA license, like Codeine. If this happened, marijuana prescriptions would almost certainly be allowed only in traditional medicinal forms, such as pills and extract drops and perhaps topical lotions and nebulizers.  It’s unlikely that the DEA and the Food and Drug Administration would allow prescriptions for smokable marijuana or pot brownies and other edibles.

Although legal under state law in more than half the states, marijuana is still illegal federally, and federal law trumps. Since 2009, the federal government has followed a policy of non-enforcement.  In short, the federal government is not enforcing federal marijuana laws, as long as anyone involved is in compliance with state marijuana laws.  It is akin to the non-enforcement of traffic laws, for speeding a few miles per hour over the limit.

If the DEA keeps marijuana on Schedule I, the federal government risks continued suffering by those with true medical ailments and continued lack of scientific study.  The DEA would be wildly out of step with rapidly changing public opinion.  If the DEA de-schedules marijuana, big tobacco companies could take over, and the fears of many anti-marijuana advocates would be realized.

To read more click here. 

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