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Tag: dead

Retired FBI Official Michael Mason Remembers Fondly Agent Robin Ahren

Michael Mason is a retired Executive Assistant Director of the FBI. Thirty years ago this month, Robin Ahrens became the first female FBI agent killed in the line of duty.

Robin Ahrens

Robin Ahrens

By Michael Mason
For ticklethewire.com

It’s hard to believe it’s been 30 years since Robin Ahrens was killed in the line of duty. I met Robin briefly when our paths crossed at the FBI Academy.

I can still remember being advised that a female agent had been killed and then hearing Robin’s name. It was like a punch in the stomach. Not really because I can claim to have known her well, we were both new agent trainees and she was one class behind my class.

Rather it was because she was one of us…not just an agent, but a brand new agent. The reality of the danger of the job became very real in that moment.

It’s always a bit more sobering to hear about the passing of anyone with whom you had even the briefest of encounters. It makes the incident less anonymous. Your story made me pause and think of all the life I have lived since she was killed.

Though I am not a religious man, it is moments like this I hope there is a heaven. It is right to pause and remember those who served and made the ultimate sacrifice.

At Least 3 Killed and 125 Others Injured in Boston Explosions

By David Abel, Travis Andersen and Martin Finucane
Boston Globe

BOSTON — At least three people were killed and at least 125 others were injured this afternoon as two powerful explosions detonated in quick succession near the Boston Marathon finish line in Boston’s Back Bay section, transforming a scene of athletic celebration into bloody chaos.

When the smoke cleared, dozens of victims lay in the street, some unconscious, some grievously injured, including some whose limbs had been torn off by the blast.

The dead included an 8-year-old boy, according to two law enforcement sources briefed on the investigation. Boston Children’s Hospital reported that those treated there included a 9-year-old girl, a 7-year-old boy, a 12-year-old, and a 2-year-old.

President Barack Obama vowed that whoever planted the explosives would be found and brought to justice.

To read more click here.

 

CIA Drone Kills al-Qaeda Leader Fahd al-Quso Tied to USS Cole Bombingmen

Fahd Mohammed Ahmed al-Quso/fbi photo

Shoshanna Utchenik
ticklethewire.com

In the war on terror, success can sometimes bring retaliation.

Global terrorist Fahd al-Quso, who had links to the USS Cole bombing, was killed in Yemen Sunday, according to Yemeni officials and confirmed by al-Qaeda, reports USA Today.

A CIA drone strike killed the top al-Qaeda leader, on the FBI Most-Wanted list for the bombing of of the ship in 2000. The CIA mission was coordinated with the U.S. military and Yemeni government, who have been partners in battle against al-Qaeda in southern Yemen.

Reports indicate that a surprise attack by al-Qaeda militants against a Yemeni army base early Monday may have been retaliation for the death of al-Quso. The cycle of violence continues as the militants killed 20 soldiers, captured 25, and made off with weapons and hardware by land and sea, according to USA Today.

Al-Quso was released from a Yemeni prison in 2007, having served 5 years for his role in the USS Cole bombing in which 17 American sailors were killed and 39 injured. He was also implicated in the failed Underwear bomber attempt, in a 2009 Christmas flight over Detroit.

To read more click here.

 

Ex-FBI Agent Weighs in on Detroit Case Where 4 Women Found Dead in Car Trunks

Paul Lindsay; Ex-Detroit FBI Agent and Prolific Author of 7 Novels Dead at 68

Paul Lindsay/simon & schuster photo

 By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Paul Lindsay, the hard-digging FBI agent who became a prolific author, and wrote seven novels — the last two of which were N.Y. Times best sellers — died peacefully Thursday night at a Boston hospital of pneumonia with his family by his side. He was 68.

The ex-Marine, who friends kidded was a cop trapped in an agent’s suit, was known for his dogged pursuit of criminals, his sharp wit and sometimes a lack of patience for management.

Lindsay graduated from MacMurray College in 1968 and served a tour of duty in Vietnam as a Marine Corps infantry officer, according to his website. In the Marine Corps, he was a Company Platoon Commander who was awarded two Purple Hearts and the Silver for bravery, according to the family.

He later joined the FBI and worked in the Detroit office for 20 years. He lived in Rye, N.H.

He authored his first book at the tail end of his FBI career, which stirred controversy in the FBI because it was a thinly veiled novel that took shots at some folks in the agency.

He went on to write six other books. And just last month it was reported that Millenium Films had acquired the rights to “The Bricklayer”, his best-selling novel penned under the pseudonym Noah Boyd, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Book was written under the pseudonym Noah Boyd

The report also noted that Scottish actor Gerard Butler is supposed to star in the film as a rogue former agent who’s services are needed to battle a criminal group that’s been demanding multi-million dollar ransom payments.

Friends and family  said that Lindsay died due to complications from pneumonia.

He had been diagnosed in 2005 with a blood cancer, leukemia,  that compromised his white blood cell count, the possible result of his exposure to chemical defoliates when he served in the Marines in Vietnam, the family said.

The condition eventually left him with compromised immune system, which made it difficult to fight off infection. The family said he kept his condition secret from everyone but his immediate family and one friend.

“He never wanted anyone to feel sorry for him or treat him differently–he never permitted himself that luxury,” his family wrote in an email to friends.

In part of a memoir the family shared with friends, Lindsay wrote:

“I am dying. A single cell, damaged and then mutated, is now multiplying at a Pandorian rate through my bloodstream. The aberration was triggered, from best guesses, by Agent Orange, the defoliant dumped so generously-18,000,000 gallons or so–on Vietanam to help keep American troops alive. An irony that is life itself.

“For me, it was over forty years ago. The medical term is Chronic Lyphocytic Leukemia, or to those of us on more intimate footing, CLL. The disease has reached stage four, and unfortunately there is neither a cure nor a stage five.

“. . . I have been the recipient of a great deal of luck in my life. But as John Steinbeck wrote in The Pearl, ‘Luck, you see, brings bitter friends’.”

“Recent events have made it apparent that good fortune is nothing more than a temporary statistical anomaly, which given enough time has little choice but to swing in an opposite and equal arc. In my case, leukemia. Given the extraordinary adventure my good luck has provided to my years, I can offer no complaint about the pendulum’s final resting place.”

His family concluded the email by saying: “Our Father will be missed, loved and remembered.”

Funeral services will be held at the Robert K. Gray, Jr. Funeral Home 24 Winnacunnet Road, Hampton, N.H. Saturday morning, Sept. 10 at 10 a.m.

Family and friends are invited to call to the funeral home on Friday 2:00-4:00PM and 7:00-9:00PM.

Interment will be at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.

In his memory contributions may be directed to: The Wounded Warrior Program

 

Rumors are That Boston Mobster Whitey Bulger Died; FBI Says No Proof It’s True

The Oklahoma Bombing 16 Years Later: We’re No Longer Surprised

After the bombing/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Sixteen years ago today, America was served up one horrific surprise: The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Building in Oklahoma City: 168 people died.

It was shocker.

At the time — April 19, 1995 –  as a reporter at the Detroit News, I called around to federal law enforcement people, checking to see what they knew. Some speculated that it was foreign terrorists, just like in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

Others suggested it had something to do with Waco. The foreign terrorist theory sounded more palatable. The idea of our own citizens committing such an atrocity seemed unlikely.

I was wrong.

Two days later, I was headed up to Decker, Mi., about two hours outside of Detroit, to check out a farm  the FBI and ATF  agents were raiding.  The farm belonged to James Nichols. His brother Terry and Tim McVeigh had spent time there. Terry Nichols and Tim McVeigh were later convicted. McVeigh was put to death.

Now, 16 years later, we’ve evolved. The  thought of one our own committing a terrorist act simply doesn’t phase us.  A lone wolf. A naturalized citizen. A convert.  An anti-government fanatic. Nothing surprises us any more.

Sixteen years isn’t a particularly noteworthy milestone. But around this time of year, I always feel like its worth noting and offering condolences to the many families who lost loved ones in Oklahoma City.

Mayor of Juarez on Mexico’s Border Hates The Drug Cartels; They Want Him Dead