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Tag: deception

Opinion by The Atlantic: FBI Lies A lot – And It’s Often an Affront to Fourth Amendment & Consent

By Conor Friedersdorf
The Atlantic

The FBI lies a lot.

Sometimes that’s fully justified. Brave agents risk their lives to infiltrate terrorist cells, organized crime, and child-pornography rings. Subterfuge is vital to these operations, and needn’t harm the country if done correctly. But there are certain kinds of lies and untruths that the FBI should carefully avoid. FBI Director James Comey isn’t always able to identify them.

Consider his remarks on three separate subjects.

The first is the debate about whether Apple, Google, and other device manufacturers should build security vulnerabilities into their devices so that the tiny subset that police want to search can be compromised after a warrant is obtained. Comey went on 60 Minutes and misled its audience about whether a warrant is always needed to read your email. He “clarified” his remarks during a subsequent speech at the Brookings Institution. But key details of that speech turned out to be misleading too. Perhaps these were untruths spoken out of ignorance and lack of preparation rather than lies. Either way, an FBI director should take special care to speak accurately when engaged in public debate about important matters of public policy. Comey keeps failing that standard.

Subject No. 2 concerns an FBI lie that everyone acknowledges to be deliberate. Agents in Las Vegas suspected an illegal gambling ring was being run out of a few fancy hotel rooms. But they didn’t have enough evidence for a search warrant. The law forbade them from entering unless the inhabitants let them in voluntarily.

The agents hatched a scheme. They would shut off the room’s Internet connection as if it had broken, pose as hotel employees coming to fix the problem, and thereby gain the “consent” of the inhabitants to come in and look around. This is an affront to the Fourth Amendment and the concept of consent.

To read more click here.

Justice Department Wants Cyclist Lance Armstrong to Pay for Lying about Performance-Enhancing Drugs

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Lance Armstrong has made a lot of money in cycling. 

Now the Justice Department wants some of that money and may sue Armstrong for allegedly profiting.

The Justice Department is going after cyclist Lance Armstrong, saying he defrauded the U.S. government by denying years of using performance-enhancing drugs, the Associated Press reports.

One of Armstrong’s long-time sponsors was the U.S. Postal Service, the AP wrote.

Speaking to an attorney familiar with the case, the AP reported that attorneys from both sides have been meeting in hopes of reaching a settlement.

However, the AP wrote, both sides disagree wildly on what’s owed.

ATF Agent Jay Dobyns Rips ATF About “Fast and Furious” and His Problems With the Agency

Feds Say Father-Son Thwarted Iran Embargo Through Deception

By Justin Blum
Bloomberg

WASHINGTON — In its search for American-built F-5 fighter jet parts, Iran turned to a father-son company operating out of a yellow stucco cottage on a country road on Ireland’s northwest coast.

Tom and Sean McGuinn are accused in a U.S. indictment of conspiracy, trade violations and making false statements to illegally export items with military uses beginning in 2005. Over the past decade, the McGuinns shipped more than $120 million in U.S.-made equipment to the Islamic Republic, Clark Settles, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official, said in an interview.

They succeeded through simple deceptions and persistence, according to court and government documents and interviews with U.S. officials and people who did business with their company, Mac Aviation Ltd. They are still free in Ireland.

Their tale illustrates how Iran is leaning on a network of people often operating out of houses or storefronts to evade a U.S. embargo and obtain parts with military uses, American officials said.

To read more click here.