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Tag: Deep Throat

Book Claims “Deep Throat” Leaked Because He Wanted Top FBI Spot

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The legend of Watergate lives on.

A book to be released next month, “Leak: Why Mark Felt Became Deep Throat,” reports that Felt, the number two guy in the FBI during Watergate, was leaking, not out of concern for public good but rather because he was angry he was not getting the top spot in the bureau, according the news agency ANI.

The book, authored by Max Holland, claims that Felt — known as “Deep Throat” to journalists —  hoped President Nixon would fire others, thinking they were leaking info, and Felt routinely lied to Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein that one of his rivals in the FBI was trying to blackmail Nixon.

To read more click here. 

“Deep Throat” Parking Garage Gets Historical Signpost

Mark Felt/face the nation

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

In a nondescript Rosslyn, Va. parking garage in 1972, a FBI deputy director met with two young Washington Post reporters, sharing strands of information that would eventually take down the president of the United States.

The Watergate story has become an American legend, a story many from that era share with their children. The FBI deputy director: “Deep Throat”, later revealing himself in 2005 as W. Mark Felt. The reporters: Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.

Now that garage boasts a historical marker, reports USA Today. Arlington County drafted the sign in 2008 and put it up this past Friday, according to the report. The text of the sign reads:

Mark Felt, second in command at the FBI, met Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward here in this parking garage to discuss the Watergate scandal. Felt provided Woodward information that exposed the Nixon administration’s obstruction of the FBI’s Watergate investigation. He chose the garage as an anonymous secure location. They met at this garage six times between October 1972 and November 1973. The Watergate scandal resulted in President Nixon’s resignation in 1974. Woodward’s managing editor, Howard Simons, gave Felt the code name “Deep Throat.” Woodward’s promise not to reveal his source was kept until Felt announced his role as Deep Throat in 2005.

But, as the USA Today article notes, a keen blogger pointed out a slight inaccuracy on the signpost. W. Joseph Campbell, on his Media Myth Alert blog, took issue with the line that “Felt provided Woodward information that exposed the Nixon administration’s obstruction of the FBI’s Watergate investigation.” Not so, says Campbell, who wrote:

Such evidence would have been so damaging and explosive that it surely would have forced Nixon to resign the presidency well before he did, in August 1974.

Felt didn’t have that sort of information — or (less likely) didn’t share it with Woodward.

As described in Woodward’s book about Felt, The Secret Man, the FBI official provided or confirmed a good deal of piecemeal evidence about the scandal as it unfolded.

Read more about the sign at WTOP.com

Weekend Series on History of Crime: The Death of Deep Throat

FBI May Have Been a Little Too Deep Into Investigating the Real Deep Throat

It’s hard to believe in 1972 the FBI had nothing better to do. Then again, this must havedeep-throat been a coveted assignment.

By MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press
MIAMI — Newly released FBI files show agents across the country and at the highest level of the agency investigated “Deep Throat” — the 1972 porn movie, not the shadowy Watergate figure — in a vain attempt to roll back a shift toward a more permissive culture.

The documents released to The Associated Press show the extent of agents’ investigation into the film: seizing copies of the movie, having negatives analyzed in labs and interviewing everyone from actors and producers to messengers who delivered reels to theaters.

All of it was a failed attempt to stop the spread of a movie that some saw as the victory of a cultural and sexual revolution and others saw as simply decadent.

For Full Story

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