best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

January 2018
S M T W T F S
« Dec    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Denver

DEA: Biggest Opioid Distribution in U.S. History ‘Hijacked’ by Federal Lawyers

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A painstaking, two-year investigation into the biggest opioid distribution case in U.S. history yielded what investigators said was solid evidence that the company had failed to report suspicious orders of highly addictive painkillers.

But instead of bringing big penalties to the first-ever criminal case against a drug distribution company, the nation’s largest company, McKesson Corp., top attorneys at the DEA and Justice Department intervened, striking an agreement that was “far more lenient than the field division wanted,” according to the Washington Post

“This is the best case we’ve ever had against a major distributor in the history of the Drug Enforcement Administration,” said Schiller, who recently retired as assistant special agent in charge of DEA’s Denver field division after a 30-year career with the agency. “I said, ‘How do we not go after the number one organization?’ ”

Schiller called the intervention “insulting.”

“Morale has been broken because of it,” he added.

Helen Kaupang, a DEA investigator and supervisor for 29 years who worked on the McKesson case in Denver, minced no words: “Within the ranks, we feel like our system was hijacked.”

The Post wrote:

The result illustrates the long-standing conflict between drug investigators, who have taken an aggressive approach to a prescription opioid epidemic that killed nearly 200,000 people between 2000 and 2016, and the government attorneys who handle those cases at the DEA and the Justice Department.

None of McKesson’s warehouses would lose their DEA registrations. The company, a second-time offender, had promised in 2008 to be more diligent about the diversion of its pills to the street. It ultimately agreed to temporarily suspend controlled substance shipments at four distribution centers and pay a $150 million fine.

FBI Received Multiple Warnings about Man Who Killed Transit Official

Suspect Joshua Cummings

Suspect Joshua Cummings

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A man accused of shooting and killing an armed transit security official in downtown Denver late Tuesday night was on the federal terrorism watch list and kicked out of a mosque in Texas.

Local law enforcement warned federal authorities, including the FBI, that Cummings was in Colorado and staying at a hotel, CBS4 reports. 

Cummings, 37, was arrested Tuesday night after authorities say he shot and killed Scott Von Lanken, a 56-year-old Regional Transportation District security guard.

About a month ago, local police alerted the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force in Colorado to Cummings’ presence.

It’s unclear whether federal authorities did anything with the information.

Veterans of Secret Service Admonish Agent Who Won’t Take Bullet for President Trump

secret serviceBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Veterans of the Secret Service said they were stunned to learn an agent based in Denver said she would not take a bullet for President Trump.

Gary Byrne, who protected President Clinton and the Oval Office, told Fox News that he was astonished by Special Agent Kerry O’Grady’s statements on Facebook. 

“It is unheard of and unbelievable that someone at her level would comment publicly on being unwilling to protect the president,” said Byrne, author of “Crisis of Character.” “Everyone has their own personal political opinions, but this job is not personal. You take an oath to the country, not the person. You are protecting the office, and what makes the country great.”

Retired Secret Service Agent Dan Emmett, author of “Within Arms Length” and “I Am a Secret Service Agent,” also admonished O’Grady.

“Her stated refusal or unwillingness to do what all Secret Service agents have been willing and expected to do since 1902 when the Secret Service began protecting presidents presents the worst possible example for her agents as well as all young agents Service wide. She has at this point rendered herself completely irrelevant as an agent. Few will be willing to work for her or with her.”

The Secret Service pledged to take “appropriate action” after her Facebook post came to the agency’s attention.

FBI Appoints New Special Agent in Charge of Denver Division

Calvin Shivers, special agent in charge of the FBI's Denver Division.

Calvin Shivers, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Denver Division.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Calvin Shivers, who joined the FBI in 1990, is the new special agent in charge of the FBI’s Denver Division.

FBI Director James Comey announced the appointment Monday in a press release.

Shivers had been the acting special agent in charge since August.

He replaces Thomas Ravenelle, who was transferred to FBI headquarters.

The Denver division is responsible for overseeing Colorado and Wyoming.

Previously, Shivers was the section chief of the violent crimes against children section in the Criminal Investigative Division at FBI headquarters.

TSA Confiscated 22,000+ Prohibited Weapons from Carry-On Bags in 2015

Guns seized by the TSA.

Guns seized by the TSA.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The TSA confiscated 22,196 prohibited weapons from checked carry-on bags in 2015.

Of those, 2,653 were guns, and 83% of them were loaded. That’s a record number of guns confiscated by the TSA, The Week reports. 

Denver International Airport had the most confiscations, with more than 1,000 dangerous items found in carry-on bags.

Among the confiscated weapons were firearms, ammunition, knives, stun guns, mace, fireworks and hand grenades.

Other Stories of Interest

The Supreme Court, Police Shootings and Black Lives Matter

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

Have the frenzied media coverage of incidents involving police shootings of African Americans and the protests of Black Lives Matter activists affected the Supreme Court?  The Court has not addressed a case involving race and the criminal justice system in some time, but two such cases are scheduled for oral argument this month.

Coincidence or a legitimate attempt to weigh in on a crisis jeopardizing law enforcement lives and the faith of minority Americans in the fairness of the criminal process?

US_Supreme_Court

The Court exercises discretion in at least three ways: what cases to accept for hearing (only about 1% are heard), the timing of oral argument (these cases were set for the first month of the 2016-2017 term), and in the individual votes and opinions of the Justices). The first two seem to demonstrate a special sensitivity to this subject which is embroiling race relations in America.

However, the other related question is whether the open seat on the Court from the death of Justice Scalia will affect the Court’s ability to decide these cases and to resolve conflicts in the lower courts. A 4-4 vote will mean that the lower court decision will stand. In these two cases the lower courts both rejected the petitions of minority defendants on racial issues.

The first of the two cases is Buck v. Davis, a death penalty appeal which has bounced around the Texas state courts, the federal district court in Houston and the 5th Circuit since Buck’s sentence of death in 1996. Buck was convicted of capital murder of his ex-girlfriend and a man at her house in a jealousy-fueled shooting spree. During the penalty hearing his defense attorney, who had a notoriously bad record in capital cases, called a psychologist to testify on the subject of Buck’s likelihood of posing a danger in the future.

In Texas the jury must unanimously conclude that the defendant poses a danger of violence to warrant the verdict of death. The defense psychologist testified that the fact that he was Black made him statistically more likely to be dangerous. Ultimately, however, the psychologist was of the opinion that he was at a lower probability of being dangerous. His report, which included the race analysis, was admitted as a defense exhibit. The prosecutor reiterated this race opinion in cross-examination and the witness’s conclusion in his closing argument.

On the most recent appeal, the 5th Circuit concluded that, although racial appeals had long been unconstitutional in criminal trials, the defendant had not met the standard of a substantial showing of prejudice to justify a Certificate of Appeal. There had been no proof that the result would have been different without the expert’s testimony in view of the defendant’s callous actions and his lack of remorse. The defense showing on appeal was not extraordinary and the prejudice de minimis.

This particular psychologist had repeated this race-based statistical opinion in six other capital cases, and the Texas Attorney General announced in a press conference that it would not oppose re-sentencing in all of those cases. However, a new Attorney General reneged on this promise as to Buck’s case.

In addition to the race-based issue, the case illustrates the tension in capital cases between two important principles. In cases involving the death penalty errors in the trial are painstakingly reviewed and appellate opinions often reach to achieve due process. On the other hand, there is a need for finality in the resolution of criminal cases. The length of time capital defendants sit on death row today is considered by some to be a failure of finality in the system.

Read more »

Suspected Bank Robber Sues FBI, City of Denver for Two False Arrests

bank robberyBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A man arrested twice on suspicions of robbing banks has sued the FBI, the city of Denver and its police department, claiming he was falsely arrested and subjected to excessive force and malicious prosecution.

FOX31 reports that officials dismissed bank robbery charges against Steve Tally, who is now homeless and is seeking $10 million.

His lawyers are from the same New York firm that represents the Central Park Five, winning a $40 million judgment.

Talley was arrested for a pair of bank robberies in September 2014.

Prosecutors dismissed the charged after Tally proved his alibi that he was working during the first robbery.

Months later, Tally was arreted again based on FBI facial recognition technology. But an FBI analysis later showed Talley was not the man in the surveillance video.

“He was guilty before he was proven that he was innocent,” bank teller Bonita Shipp said. “He was an innocent man. He didn’t do it.”

TSA Screeners Aren’t Charged on Allegations of Groping ‘Attractive’ Male Passengers

tsaBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Two Denver airport security screeners who were fired after being accused of fondling attractive male passengers will not be charged, NBC News reports. 

The TSA screeners, a man and a woman, were fired in April following a six-month investigation by the TSA, which alerted Denver police to the allegations in March.

But Monday, the Denver district attorney’s office said investigators were unable to prove that one of the screeners was working at the time of the alleged incidents.

The male screener was accused of signaling to the female screener when an attractive man was approaching. The female passenger was then accused of patting down the passenger’s groin by signaling to the machine that the passenger was a woman.

“These alleged acts are egregious and intolerable,” the TSA said in a statement in April. “TSA has removed two officers from the agency.”

Other Stories of Interest