best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

December 2016
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Drugs

Border Patrol Agent Headed to Trial for Allegedly Lying to Federal Authorities

border patrolBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Border Patrol agent accused of lying to federal agents about a drug conspiracy case is headed to trial in early January.

Eduardo Bazan Jr. pleaded not guilty Thursday in federal court, the Monitor reports. 

Bazan, 48, of Edinburg, was arrested on Nov. 3 and has been on administrative leave since.

Authorities allege he lied to Homeland Security investigators during an Oct. 31 interview.

“Bazan admitted he had lied to agents Oct. 31, 2016, and that Bazan had in fact received information from an individual that led to a seizure of 66 kilograms of cocaine; seized on Feb. 18, 2007,” the criminal complaint reads.

According to the complaint, Bazan admitted he lied to federal agents about th presence of suspects at the scene of the seizure.

“Bazan stated he had run from the scene to make other agents believe the vehicle had been occupied. Bazan further admitted that he had received a payment of approximately $8,000 for assisting the (Drug Trafficking Organization) with the staged seizure,” the court document states.

FBI Raids Dozens of Homes in Indiana As Part of Major Drug Investigation

FBI file photo

FBI file photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI agents working on a major drug investigation raided dozens of Indianapolis homes early Thursday morning.

The raids began around 6 a.m. and appear to involve methamphetamine in central Indiana, Call 6 reports. 

It wasn’t immediately clear how may people were arrested at 8:30 a.m. today.

The FBI plans to release more details later today.

The FBI was assisted by the DEA and the Indiana State Police.

The FBI declined to comment this morning.

Smugglers Increasingly Using Drones to Drop Drugs over U.S.-Mexico Border

DroneBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Smugglers are increasingly using drones to drop drugs over the U.S-Mexico border.

Border Patrol is using six blimps that can detect low-flying aircraft using specialized radar, CBS News reports.  The drones are monitored by Tethered Aerostat Radar System (TARS), which can cover the entire boarder.

“Our law enforcement operators that see that on the radar and get the drugs, get the bad guys that are waiting for the drugs,” said Rob Brown the TARS program manager 

To fly below the radar, smugglers often fly dangerously low.

“They’ll hug the mountains really close just to try and break up their profile,” said Brent J. Smart, an Air and Marine Interdiction Agent. 

The TARS technology helps agents find drugs that are dropped from the sky.

DEA Shows Major Culture Shift in How It Handles Drug Bans After Kratom Reversal

Kratom pill, via Wikipedia.

Kratom pill, via Wikipedia.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA appears to be undergoing a major shift in how it handles the war on drugs.

After mounting public pressure, the DEA backed down on its pledge to ban Kratom, a south-east Asian plant that proponents say is an effective treatment for addiction to opioids.

“This is an unprecedented action. It’s never happened before,” said agency spokesman Russ Bayer, the Guardian reports. “We’ve never withdrawn a notice to temporarily schedule any substance but we want to move through this process in a transparent manner.” 

Bayer said the DEA is changing its approach to drugs under acting director Chuck Rosenberg.

“We have had kind of a cultural, organizational transformation during the past year,” Bayer said. “Our core mission has remained the same. It will always be to go after the biggest, most sophisticated, most violent drug traffickers and organizations responsible for the supply of drugs. But Mr Rosenberg has brought in an added emphasis, an increased awareness of some of the other functions that DEA needs to be engaged with. First and foremost community outreach, educating the public in terms of drug abuse, talking about addiction as being a disease.”

DEA Agent’s Daughter, Dubbed As ‘Adorable Drug Kingpin,’ Has Been Indicted

Sarah Furay, dubbed the "Adorable Drug Kingpin."

Sarah Furay, dubbed the “Adorable Drug Kingpin.”

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A DEA agent’s daughter, whose smiling mugshot went viral, has been indicted 11 months after she was arrested on drug charges.

Sarah Elizabeth Furay, 20, was indicted on four charges related to drug dealing, the Houston Chronicle reports. 

She’s charged with possession with intent to deliver cocaine, methamphetamine and lysergic acid diethylamide, or LSD. Furay also was charged with possession of marijuana.

Some of the media dubbed Furay as an “adorable drug kingpin” after she was arrested in November 2015.

The DEA confirmed in December that her father, Bill Furay, worked for the agency for more than 20 years and was then a supervisory special agent in the Houston division.

A trial date has not yet been scheduled.

Other Stories of Interest

FBI’s Fight Against Rising Heroin Use Leads to Arrest of Man Linked to Overdoses

800px-HeroinBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI’s fight against the rising use of heroin led to the arrest of a man accused of selling the drug to people who overdosed in the greater New Orleans area.

Special Agent in Charge Jeffrey Sallet said the FBI investigation was in response to a recent rise in heroin overdoses, the Associated Press reports. 

The New Orleans Violent Crime Task Force led the investigation, which resulted in the arrest of 39-year-old Gary Hagan on Friday on a charge of distributing heroin.

As of Sunday, Hagan remained in jail after a $140,000 bond was set.

Other Stories of Interest

DEA to Reduce Opioid Manufacturing by 25% in 2017 to Curb Abuse, Overdoses

Fentanyl tablets

Fentanyl tablets

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA’s fight against painkiller abuse has prompted the agency to reduce opioid manufacturing by 25% in 2017.

The cutback will affect drugs such as fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone and hydrocodone, the Verge reports. 

The good news is, fewer prescriptions are being written for opioids as doctors are becoming more aware of painkiller abuse and its link to heroin use.

The abuse of heroin and opioids are a major reason that 2014 was the deadliest year on record for drug overdoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 60% of the overdoses involved an opioid.

Opioids also have become the second most popular drug for non-medical use after marijuana.

Other Stories of Interest

Depth in the Sands: The Horror of the U.S.-Mexico Border

How the FBI Wound Up Destroying Evidence in Clinton Investigation

FBI Nab ISIS Terrorist Trying to Kill U.S. Soldier

FBI Hopes Sketch Will Help Solve 40-Year-Old Ohio Cold Case

Former FBI Agent Named Head of Erie County Central Police Services

DEA’s Intention to Ban Kratom Spurs Outrage in Petition to White House

Kratom pill, via Wikipedia.

Kratom pill, via Wikipedia.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA’s plan to ban kratom, a natural substance that is abused and can be dangerous, has spurred outrage from people who say it is an effective treatment, including for people addicted to opioids.

More than 100,000 people signed a petition to urge President Obama to intervene in the DEA’s fight against kratom, the Huffington Post reports. 

“Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse,” reads the petition. “This is not true for Kratom, it has been shown numerous times in reports from users to help recovering Opiate addicts, treat pain, combat depression and anxiety, and much more.”

The DEA insists kratom should be banned to “avoid an imminent hazard to public safety.”

Supporters of kratom criticized the DEA for failing to ask for public comment.

“Rather than have an emergency scheduling, why not host a summit meeting with all of the groups and organizations and investors that are out there selling this product and say, ‘Hey, these are our concerns. If you don’t clean this up this is what we’re going to do’?” Susan Ash, founder of the American Kratom Association, a nonprofit that supports kratom consumers, told The Huffington Post last week. “Why not go to the sources that they’re having the problems with?”

Huffington Post wrote:

Kratom is made from the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa, a Southeast Asian tree related to coffee, and has been consumed in Asia for millennia, typically as a tea or powder. The herb contains alkaloids that appear to activate opioid receptors in the brain and reduce pain. Although most opioids have sedative qualities, low to moderate doses of kratom serve as a mild stimulant.

'