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Tag: Drugs

Woman Arrested After Hitting Border Patrol Horse in the Face

Karla Banegas-Banegas

Karla Banegas-Banegas

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A woman accused of transporting marijuana also faces a charge of animal cruelty after allegedly punching a horse in the face.

Karla Banegas-Banegas, 29, was with a group of nine people spotted with backpacks along the Barry Goldwater Bombing range in Why, Ariz., about 30 miles north of the Mexican border, AZCentral reports. 

As the group fled, agents caught up with six of the nine suspects.

Banegas-Banegas “punched a USBP horse in the face with a closed fist,” records said. The extent of the horse’s injuries was unknown.

Agents reported finding seven backpacks fun of “green, leafy plant material” that ended up being marijuana.

“The remoteness of the area makes it an ideal place for drug smugglers to attempt to smuggle narcotics into the United States,” court documents said.

Border Patrol Agent Indicted on Charges of Drug Delivery, Possession

border patrolBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Border Patrol agent has been indicted on charges of drug delivery and possession.

Details of the allegations against Agent Daniel Polanco have not yet been released.

“Agent Polanco has been indicted for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance, and is also charged with one count of possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance,” Deputy Chief Patrol Agent Raul Ortiz said, reports RGV Proud . Daniel Polanco has been employed with CBP for 9 years. After he turned himself in today, he was placed on leave without pay.”

Ortiz emphasized that the allegations do nor reflect the values and principles of the Border Patrol.

Other Stories of Interest

DEA Helps Investigate Prince’s Death After Prescription Painkillers Found

Prince, via Wikipedia.

Prince, via Wikipedia.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA has been called to help investigate the death of pop superstar Prince after authorities allegedly found prescription painkillers when the musician died.

Newsweek reports that the drugs were found in Prince’s possession at his Paisley Park recording facility and at his home near Minnesota.

It’s still unclear whether the prescription medication played a role in the singer’s death.

The DEA is being asked to determine where the drugs came from and whether Prince had prescriptions for the medication.

Prince’s longtime lawyer L. Londell McMillan insisted the musician was “not on any drugs that would be any cause for concern.”

He said: “Everybody who knows Prince knows he wasn’t walking around drugged up. That’s foolish. No one ever saw Prince and said: ‘He looks high.’ It wasn’t what he was about.”

Authorities Discover Massive U.S.-Mexico Drug Tunnel, Seize 1 ton of Cocaine

Part of the tunnel.

Part of the tunnel.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Federal authorities discovered a massive drug-trafficking tunnel underneath the California-Mexico border, seizing one ton of cocaine and seven tons of marijuana and arresting six people.

“We believe this to be the longest tunnel that we have discovered in this district to date,” Laura Duffy, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of California, told ABC News.

The cocaine was worth about $22 million.

The 800-yard tunnel began at a house in Tijuana and ended in the Otay Mesa neighborhood of San Diego.

“On the surface, few would ever suspect that traffickers were moving multiton quantities of cocaine and marijuana worth tens of millions of dollars in such an unassuming way, through this rabbit hole in the ground, in full view of the world around it,” Duffy said.

Portland Press Herald: Marijuana Doesn’t Belong on DEA’s ‘Most Dangerous’ List

MarijuanaBy Editorial Board
Portland Press Herald

Consensus is growing among Maine physicians that cannabis can effectively treat some medical conditions, and the number of people seeking prescriptions is rising right along with it.

But access to medicinal cannabis is still complicated by federal guidelines that hinder research on the effectiveness of medical marijuana and hamper the development of cannabis-based medications. Federal regulators should finally remove cannabis from the most dangerous class of drugs and enable thousands of doctors and patients to benefit from policymaking grounded in evidence, not outdated fears.

Over 300 doctors and nurse practitioners in Maine certify patients to use medical cannabis. Some have a background in holistic medicine, the Maine Sunday Telegram’s Gillian Graham reported this week. Others are skeptics swayed by improvements in patients who were able to trade hundreds of pills a month for medical cannabis.

Both advocates and providers say there aren’t enough caregivers willing to certify patients. Medical practices and doctors are concerned about the lack of evidence in favor of medical cannabis, as well as the lack of Food and Drug Administration approval for cannabis products, the Maine Hospital Association told the Telegram. And since health insurers don’t cover a medication unless it has the FDA’s endorsement, medical cannabis can be financially out of reach even for certified patients.

But the possibility of change is on the horizon. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration announced last week that it will decide by July whether to remove cannabis from its list of Schedule I drugs: dangerous substances, like heroin and LSD, without any “currently acceptable medical use.”

Of course, this status – which has been in place since 1970 – is self-perpetuating: It discourages scientists from doing the research on dosages, safety and effectiveness that’s needed for a medication to get federal approval. And it deters colleges and universities from funding studies that could be of value to millions.

To read more click here. 

Other Stories of Interest

DEA Investigating 8 Fatal Overdoses of Fentanyl in Sacramento County

pillsBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA is investigating eight fatal overdoses related to the painkiller fentanyl in Sacramento County over the past month.

“People are getting the message (about the dangers of fentanyl),” Sacramento County Public Health Officer Dr. Olivia Kasirye told the Sacramento Bee. “The trend we are seeing is very hopeful, but people need to be careful and should not be taking pills that are not from a credible place like a pharmacy.”

Using dozens of investigators, the DEA is trying to track down the sale of the fentanyl pills, which “were masquerading” as other more mild painkillers.

“We are making progress,” said Casey Rettig, a DEA special agent based in San Francisco, who declined to offer more specifics.

The overdoses were first reported on March 23.

Other Stories of Interest

Weekend Series on Crime: Inside El Chapo’s Escape Tunnel

Justice Department Defends Legally Questionable Eavesdropping Program

courtroomBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department is defending the DEA’s legally questionable, disbanded eavesdropping program that often was used by drug officials in the Los Angeles suburbs.

The USA Today reports that the Justice Department implored a judge not to toss out the wiretaps that were used in a marijuana trafficking case, despite earlier objections from government lawyers who believed the practice may have been illegal.

The Justice Department aid the wiretaps were “authorized in accordance with state and federal law.”

The surveillance was used so often that it once counted for nearly a fifth of all U.S. wiretaps.

The surveillance allowed federal authorities to intercept millions of calls and text messages with a single state court’s approval.

Defense lawyers in the marijuana case said the prosecutors approved “illegal wiretaps with astounding frequency” and urged a judge to dismiss the surveillance.

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