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Tag: Faisal Shahzad

FBI Memo Says Interrogators Can Delay Reading Miranda Warning to Terrorist Suspects

Faisal Shahzad

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — An FBI memo issued in December says investigators can interrogate domestic-terror suspects longer without giving them a Miranda warning, according to a  Wall Street Journal report by Evan Perez.

The FBI memo  said the policy applies to “exceptional cases” where investigators “conclude that continued unwarned interrogation is necessary to collect valuable and timely intelligence not related to any immediate threat,” the Journal reported. Interrogators would still need prior approval from FBI and Justice officials.

The controversy over the Miranda warning in domestic terrorism cases surfaced in December 2009 with the “underwear bomber” in Detroit and later the Times Square Bomber.

Both were initially questioned for a period of time before the Miranda warning was read.  The underwear bomber, Umar Farouk Abdumtallab, was questioned for less than an hour before the Miranda warning was read and Faisal Shahzad, the Times Square Bomber, was questioned for about three hours before the warning was read, the Journal reported.

Some  Republican and Democrats felt the suspects should have been sent to military detentions where the Miranda rules don’t apply, the Journal reported. Other critics felt the Miranda warning was issued too soon, jeopardizing chances of getting more valuable information.

But at the time, the Obama administration countered by saying the suspects continued to cooperate after the Miranda warnings were read and provided value information.

On the other side, some feel the government has no right to take the Miranda warning away from domestic terrorists.

The FBI memo seems follow to some degree a 1984 amendment to the  1966 Miranda ruling which allows questioning of suspects for a limited time before issuing the warning.

Matthew Miller, a Justice Department spokesman, told the Journal that  “law enforcement has the ability to question suspected terrorists without immediately providing Miranda warnings when the interrogation is reasonably prompted by immediate concern for the safety of the public or the agents.” He said “the threat posed by terrorist organizations and the nature of their attacks—which can include multiple accomplices and interconnected plots—creates fundamentally different public safety concerns than traditional criminal cases.”

Calif. Rep. Adam Schiff, the top Dem on the House Intelligence Committee, told the Journal that the administration’s tweaking of the law could have a downside.

“I don’t think the administration can accomplish what I think needs to be done by policy guidance alone,” he said.  “It may not withstand the scrutiny of the courts in the absence of legislation.”

FBI Releases List of Some of its Top Terrorism Cases in 2010

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The year 2010 was full of almost-disastrous terrorist acts  from the Times Square Bomber to the the Portland teen who tried to detonate a car bomb during a Christmas-lighting ceremony in Oregon, only to find out it was an FBI  sting.

Not everyone agreed with the FBI tactics when it came to  stings like the ones in Portland, Baltimore and the Washington area. Some accused the FBI of making terrorists out of lost souls looking for a mission. But Attorney Gen. Eric Holder Jr. forcefully defended the FBI stings, saying they were legitimate investigative tools.

In a speech earlier this month in California, Holder specifically defended the FBI tactics in the Portland, Ore. case at the Christmas lighting ceremeony that led to the arrest of the teen Mohamed Osman Mohamud.

“Those who characterize the FBI’s activities in this case as ‘entrapment’ simply do not have their facts straight – or do not have a full understanding of the law,” he said.

“I make no apologies for the how the FBI agents handled their work in executing the operation that led to Mr. Mohamud’s arrest,” Holder said, according to a text of the speech distributed by the Justice Department.

The FBI on Monday released a list of what it considers some ofr its most significant terrorism cases of 2010.

The following was included in a press release:

  • Attempted bombing of Armed Forces recruiting center: A 21-year-old U.S. citizen earlier this month parked what he thought was an explosives-filled vehicle in front of a military recruiting center near Baltimore and tried to detonate it remotely. The bomb was fake, thanks to our undercover agents working the case. Details
  • Attempted bombing in Oregon: A naturalized U.S. citizen was arrested the day after Thanksgiving when he attempted to set off what he thought was a car bomb at a crowded Christmas tree lighting ceremony in downtown Portland. The 19-year-old had been the subject of a long-term undercover operation by the Bureau. Details

  • D.C. Metro bomb plot: In October, a 34-year-old naturalized U.S. citizen believed he was joining members of al Qaeda to plan multiple bombings of Metrorail stations in the Washington area. Instead, it was a sting. Farooque Ahmed researched peak rider periods so the attacks could cause mass casualties. Details
  • Al Shabaab indictments: In August—in Minnesota, Alabama, and California—two Americans were arrested and 12 others, including five U.S. citizens, were charged with terrorism offenses and providing material support to the Somali-based terrorist organization al Shabaab. Details
  • Northern Virginia man indicted: In July, 20-year-old Zachary Chesser—also known as Abu Talhah Al-Amrikee—told agents he twice attempted to travel to Somalia to join al Shabaab as a foreign fighter. On one of those occasions he tried to board a plane with his infant son as part of his “cover.” Details
  • Al Qaeda plotters indicted: In July, five senior members of al Qaeda were indicted for their roles in the 2009 plot against the New York subway system. Details
  • Missouri man guilty of supporting al Qaeda: In May, a 32-year-old naturalized U.S. citizen pled guilty to providing material support to al Qaeda and to bank fraud and money laundering. Details

Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad

  • Attempted bombing at Times Square: After a three-day nationwide manhunt, a naturalized U.S. citizen was arrested in May for an attempted bombing at New York City’s famous tourist area. Details
  • Michigan militia group indicted: In March, nine members of a militia group called the Hutaree were charged with attempted use of weapons of mass destruction and related offenses. Details
  • Jihad Jane indicted: Also in March, U.S. citizen Colleen LaRose—also known as Jihad Jane—was indicted in Philadelphia for her role in recruiting jihadist fighters to commit murder overseas. A month later, a Colorado woman and colleague of LaRose’s was indicted on similar charges. Details

It’s Life For Times Square Bomber Faisal Shahzad

Faisal Shahzad

Faisal Shahzad

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Just as expected, Faisal Shahzad, the Times Square bomber, who authorities say had links to al Qaeda in Pakistan, was given a life sentence Tuesday.

U.S. District Judge Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum, during sentencing, told Shahzad, according to the New York Times:  “You are a young man, and you will have a lot of time to reflect about what you have said today, and what you have done.”

Shahzad told the judge:

“We are only Muslims … but if you call us terrorists, we are proud terrorists and we will keep on terrorizing you,” he said, according to the Associated Press, adding at another point: “The defeat of the U.S. is imminent.”

“If I’m given 1,000 lives I will sacrifice them all for the life of Allah,” he also said. “How can I be judged by a court that does not understand the suffering of my people?”

Though Shahzad, 31,  cooperated with authorities after his capture, he showed no remorse when entering a guilty plea, eliminating even the slightest of chances of getting any break on his sentence.

After sentencing Tuesday, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara issued a statement:

“Faisal Shahzad is a remorseless terrorist who betrayed his adopted country and today was rightly sentenced to spend the rest of his life in federal prison.”

“The case of Faisal Shahzad demonstrates the global scope of the terrorist threat,” added Janice K. Fedarcyk, head of the New York FBI, in a statement. “Distinctions between home-grown and foreign terrorists are blurred when a U.S. citizen travels to Pakistan to learn bomb-making from a known terrorist organization, then returns to the U.S. and receives financial backing from the overseas organization.

” However you define him, there’s no question that Shahzad built a mobile weapon of mass destruction and hoped and intended that it would kill large numbers of innocent people – and planned to do it again two weeks later.”

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Times Square Bomber Planned to Detonate 2nd Bomb, Prosecutors Say

Faisal Shahzad

Faisal Shahzad

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The man known as the Times Square Bomber planned to set off an additional bomb two weeks later, according to court papers filed by prosecutors  Wednesday, which urged the judge to give Faisal Shahzad a life sentence.

The  papers, a sentencing memorandum,  said that Shahazd hoped to kill 40 people in the first bombing, which ended up being a dud. And he planned to set off additional bombs “until he was captured or killed.”  He was arrested at JFK  airport while trying to flee the country.

Shahzad “had every intention of delivering a powerful and terrorizing strike to the heart of New York City,” the court papers said, adding that Shahzad showed no remorse when pleading guilty on June 21.

In a 40-minute video made in Pakistan, he says, according to court papers;

“I have been trying to join my brothers in jihad ever since 9/11 happened. I am planning to wage an attack inside America.”

He then appealled to his fellow Muslims: “I also want to inform my brothers Muslim abroad living abroad [sic] that it is not difficult at all to wage an attack on the West, and specifically in the U.S., and completely defeat them inshallah. Get up and learn from me and make an effort. Nothing is impossible if you just keep in mind that Allah is with you.”

Read Shahzad Sentencing Memorandum

Long Island Man Charged With Shifting Pakistan Funds to Times Square Bomber

times square artBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A 44-year-old Long Island man was arrested on Wednesday on charges of unwittingly helping fund the Times Square bomber Faisel Shahzad, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced.

The indictment charged that Mohammad Younis transferred thousands of dollars from Pakistan to the U.S. to Shahzad through an unlicensed money transfer business known as a hawala.

Authorities said Younis was unaware of the plot. He was arrested at his Long Island home by the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force.

“By engaging in the alleged conduct, Mohammad Younis unwittingly funded a terror plot that, if successful, would have caused mass casualties in New York City,” U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement.

Acting Head of N.Y. FBI Enjoyed the Wild Ride

Acting Head Venizelos at gang arrests in Newburgh, N.Y./fbi photo

Acting Head Venizelos at gang arrests in Newburgh, N.Y./fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
For AOL News

His title may be “acting,” but there’s no pretending that things haven’t been outright wild, abuzz, atwitter, downright explosive since George Venizelos took over in March on a temporary basis as head of the New York FBI office, the largest in the country.

There was the high-anxiety Times Square car bombing case. The Russian spy case. Key indictments of mobsters. And the roundup of 78 gang members from the Latin Kings and Bloods. And that’s just to name a few. In fact, since March, his agents have had a hand in the indictment of about 330 people.

“It all happened at once. It was definitely the experience of my life. It happened so fast,” he told AOL News. “Acting can be a thankless job, but acting in New York is still a tremendous responsibility.”

Monday, Venizelos loses the “acting” title and returns to his old role as special agent in charge of administration for the New York FBI Office. The permanent boss is arriving: Janice Fedarcyk, a friend of his who’s been running the Philadelphia FBI Office.

“For me personally it was exciting,” Venizelos, 50, said. “It seemed like every week something was happening. This was just kind of the perfect storm.”

To read more click here.

WEEKEND STORIES OF INTEREST

2 Cops Shot and Man Killed in Harlem Gunfight (NY Daily News)

Time Square Bomber’s Statement Good Indicator He’s Not Likely to Get Break at Sentencing: “It’s a WAR!”

Faisal Shahzad

Faisal Shahzad

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

If there was any question whether Times Square car bomber Faisal Shahzad might catch a break during sentencing for fully cooperating with the FBI, his statements in court on Monday may have cleared that all up: It’s highly highly unlikely.

Shahzad pleaded guilty Monday and then warned the court of more attacks and accused the U.S. of “terrorizing the Muslim nations and the Muslim people,” according to the Washington Post.

“It’s a war,” he told the judge.

He said, according to the Washington Post, if the U.S. didn’t get out of Iraq, Afghanistan and other Muslim nations, “we will be attacking U.S.” and that Americans “only care about their people, but they don’t care about the people elsewhere in the world when they die.”

To read more click here.

Man Says FBI Apologized After Raiding Home in Connection with Times Square Car Bomb Probe

times square artBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has apologized to a New York man whose Long Island home was raided in connection to the Times Square car bomb incident, the man said, according to the Associated Press.

AP reported that Mohammad Iqbal said agents returned his Pakistani passport and other items seized during a raid at his Shirley, Long Island home.

Authorities conducted raids and rounded up some people suspected of having ties to Faisal Shahzad, the man who has admitted planting the failed car bomb in Times Square on May 1, AP reported. Iqbal said he never met Shahzad.

AP reported that FBI spokesman James Margolin confirmed that agents met Iqbal last week, but he did not elaborate.