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Tag: Guadalajara

Mexican Police Arrest Cartel Member Accused in 1985 Torture, Murder of DEA Agent

Ezequiel Godinez Cervantes is in custody.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Mexican police arrested a 77-year-old man accused in the 1985 torturing and killing of DEA Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena Salazar.

The arrest of Ezequiel Godinez Cervantes is major break in what was the first time a cartel had murdered a DEA agent.

DEA Agent Enrique Camarena

The FBI tipped off Mexican authorities that Godinez had crossed the border.

“The killing of an American agent on foreign soil was a huge game changer for the United States,” Gretchen Von Helms, a criminal defense attorney who has no ties to the case, told NBC 7 San Diego. “They were obviously very interested in protecting their agents down there and at the time the DEA operated in Mexico much like it was in the United States. You didn’t believe that you could be killed.”

Camarena was working undercover in February 1985 when he disappeared. His body was found a month later on a ranch in Guadalajara, Mexico.

The Guadalajara Cartel accused the agent of taking down a marijuana plantation.

“His name has morphed into a symbol of the drug wars between the United States and Mexico,” Von Helms told NBC 7.

Camarena was depicted in the Netflix show “Narcos: Mexico.”

Godinez, who also is accused of killing two Americans he mistook for DEA agents, was handed over to immigration officials for planned extradition to the U.S., where he will be charged.

Mexican Officials Challenge Early Release of DEA Agent Killer, Caro Quintero

Enrique Camarena

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Mexican officials said Tuesday they are seeking to reverse an appeals court ruling that led to the early release of a notorious drug kingpin who was in prison for killing a DEA agent, The LA Times reports.

Relations between the U.S. and Mexico became strained after Caro Quintero, the accused founder of the once-potent Guadalajara drug cartel, was released from prison after serving 28 years – 12 short of his sentence.

“The decision, in our opinion, wasn’t respectful of the legal framework,” Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Meade told reporters Tuesday. “We will have to find the way to reverse it.”

Quintero was convicted of kidnapping, torturing and murdering DEA Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena in 1985.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Mexico Drugs: How One DEA Killing Began A Brutal War

By Will Grant 
BBC News, Guadalajara 

Twenty seven years ago, the kidnap, torture and murder of a US Drug Enforcement Administration agent by Mexican drug traffickers sparked one of the biggest manhunts the US government has ever launched in North America. It also offered an ominous warning of things to come.

The picturesque Mexican city of Guadalajara is bustling with life. By day, its busy plazas are filled with street vendors and shoeshine boys. At night, the mariachis line up to play for the tourists.

The country’s drug violence feels very far from here and, most of the time, it is. But that was not always the case.

“In 1985, Guadalajara was the base of operations for most of the major narcotics traffickers in North America,” says James Kuykendall, then-head of the Guadalajara office of the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST:

Mexican Drug Lord Killed By Soldiers

Mexico border mapBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

These days Mexico chalks up far more defeats than victories when it comes to battling the increasingly violent drug cartels.

But Thursday, Mexico authorities declared a major victory when one of the  top three leaders of Mexico’s  most potent drug cartel, Ignacio “Nacho” Coronel, was killed in a gunfight with soldiers, the Associated Press reported.

AP reported that Coronel was killed near the city of Guadalajara.

To read more click here.