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Tag: IEDs

ATF’s Scott Sweetow Named Deputy Director of the Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center in Quantico

Scott Sweetow

Scott Sweetow

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

ATF agent Scott Sweetow has been named deputy director for the Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center (TEDAC).

The intergovernmental agency, which is based at the FBI Laboratory in  Quantico, Va.,  coordinates efforts to gather and share intelligence about improvised explosive devices (IEDs), helps disarm and disrupt IEDs, link them to their makers and works to try and prevent attacks.

Sweetow will be responsible for strategic planning and execution, administration, financial management, program management and oversight of the day-to-day operations

The agency, created in 2003, is headed by a director from the FBI Greg Carl. Sweetow represents the ATF in the agency.

In May 2014, Sweetow was named Deputy Assistant Director for ATF’s Office of Strategic Intelligence and Information (OSII).

He began his career with ATF in 1990 in Los Angeles, spent several years assigned in the Arson and Explosives group, and served as a Certified Explosives Specialist. His duties included being part of ATF’s elite National Response Team, which investigated such high-profile crimes as the Oklahoma City bombing and the Centennial Olympic Park bombings.

He also spent several years working criminal intelligence matters, including a weapons case targeting the “The Blind Sheikh” Omar Abdel-Rahman’s one time driver and bodyguard, Hikmat Alharahsheh.

Additionally, he served as special agent in charge of the ATF offices in Atlanta and St. Paul.

 

ATF in Thailand Training Police to Probe Explosions

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Two hours outside of Bangkok, Byron San Marco, an ATF special agent, explodes a hidden bomb slung over the back seat of a motor bike, according to a report by Time magazine.

San Marco and his ATF team will blow up two more improvised explosive devices (IEDs) at the US-funded Tactical Training Center in Cha-am, Thailand. There, they are training Thai police in post-blast training to officers who most sift through wreckage to find evidence of the explosions causes, reports Time.

“The IED has evolved into the weapon of choice for insurgent, terrorist and even criminal networks throughout the world,” the Australian Bomb Data Centre (ABDC), a part of the Australian Federal Police, said in a recent statement.

There are approximately 30,000 government troops and thousands of armed police and paramilitary soldiers deployed across southern Thailand where, like many fragile regions of the earth, IEDs are increasingly threatening.

“We train them to collect anything and everything the bomber brought,” says San Marco, according to Time. “If he delivered the device in a box and that blew up, you want 100% of the box. It may contain DNA, a bar code, a fingerprint.” A cell phone was used to denote the The motor bike bomb, which San Marco hopes his trainees will figure out through the phone’s SIM card or lasting fragments.

To read more about ATF training to Thai police click here.

Devices from Minnesota Found in Iraq IEDs, Five Charged

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Radio frequency modules from a Minnesota manufacturer, after being smuggled into Iran, ended up in improvised explosive devices used against U.S. soldiers on the battlefields of Iraq, federal authorities alleged this week.

Authorities in Singapore arrested Wong Yuh Lan (Wong), Lim Yong Nam (Nam), Lim Kow Seng (Seng), and Hia Soo Gan Benson (Hia) on Monday after a U.S. request for extradition to stand trial in DC . Hossein Larijani, a citizen of Iran, is also charged in the scheme, though he is still at large. Four companies were also indicted in the matter.

The group is accused of smuggling 6,000 radio communication devices into Iran in violation of trade laws; 16 of the devices were later found in bombs in Iraq. According to the FBI, the Singapore citizens bought the devices with a stated shipment location in Singapore, then knowingly had them illegally routed to purchasers in Iran, making tens of thousands of dollars.

“This case underscores the continuing threat posed by Iranian procurement networks seeking to obtain U.S. technology through fraud and the importance of safeguarding that technology,” Lisa Monaco, assistant attorney general for national security, said in the statement.

The 12-count indictment includes charges of conspiracy to defraud the US, smuggling, the illegal export of goods from the US to Iran, false statements and obstruction of justice, among other charges.

To read more click here.