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Tag: immigration

Baltimore Sun: Trump’s Immigration Policies Are Inhumane, Unsafe

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

By Editorial Board
The Baltimore Sun

The new immigration policies President Donald Trump‘s administration released Tuesday make America less humane; they target millions of people who have been in this country for years, have contributed to society and have raised children here. They make America less free because they portend the creation of a massive “deportation force” that will hunt through communities coast-to-coast for those here illegally, inevitably sweeping up the innocent and increasing racial and ethnic profiling. But most of all, they will make America less safe.

Mr. Trump’s spokesman, Sean Spicer, says the president intends to “take the shackles off” immigration officers to make “the No. 1 priority” removing those “who pose a threat to our country.” Actually, that was the No. 1 priority under the Obama administration, which instructed immigration enforcement agents to prioritize deportation of those who committed serious crimes while in the United States. The Trump policy would allow for deportation of people who violate traffic laws or who have even been accused of a crime but not convicted. Innocent until proven guilty no longer applies, and immigration agents will have vastly expanded authority to determine on their own who constitutes a “threat.”

Immigration courts are facing a huge backlog as it is, some 540,000 cases with an average wait of more than two years. In some courts, the delay is much longer. Mr. Trump says he wants to throw more resources at the system, but how much and how quickly? For the time being, flooding the courts with people who have not shown themselves to be a danger would only delay the deportation of people who are.

Mr. Trump plans to deal with that to some degree by vastly expanding a program that eliminates due process for some immigrants caught in this country illegally. The “expedited removal” program, as it was used by the Obama administration, allowed for the elimination of some protections and hearings before deportation for people caught near the border who had been in the country for less than two weeks. Mr. Trump wants to expand it nationwide and draw in those who have been here for up to two years.

To read more click here. 

Other Stories of Interest

Border Patrol Union Cites Increased Morale Among Agents Because of Trump

File photo of a Border Patrol agent.

File photo of a Border Patrol agent.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump’s hardline attitude toward immigration has helped boot morale among border patrol agents, according to the union representing the agents.

“There’s definitely been a shift in attitude, different shift in expectations, agents are feeling empowered to do their job. We see a President who is enforcing laws already on the books,” said Art Del Cueto, president of the Local 2544 border patrol union, according to ABC15.com.

The union representing the agents endorsed Trump during the presidential election.

Del Cuerto said agents felt they were “handcuffed” under President Obama’s administration and were frustrated with “catch and release” policies that put undocumented immigrants back onto the streets until their day in court.

Those policies, Del Cuerto said, encouraged immigrants not to show up at hearings.

“If they didn’t have any prior [arrests] you would basically release them back out into the shadows, even though they didn’t have any documentation to be here in the country legally,” said Del Cueto.

NY Post: Trump’s Immigration Orders Are Strong, But Not Harsh

Donald Trump, via Wikipedia

Donald Trump, via Wikipedia

By Editorial Board
New York Post

Team Trump’s newest immigration orders definitely toughen enforcement, but they’re a far cry from mass roundups.

If the administration sticks to this approach — prioritizing the serious criminals for apprehension and deportation, while also making it harder to succeed at immigrating illegally — it’ll have broad public support.

Over-the-top approaches (deporting law-abiding moms) will mean big trouble.

In that regard, it’s worth noting that Trump still hasn’t touched Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which gives safe harbor and work permits to those brought here illegally as young children, a k a “the dreamers.”

The Department of Homeland Security also sought to provide instant clarity this time ’round, with background briefings even as DHS chief John Kelly issued his latest orders.
In a conference call with reporters, one official noted, “We do not have the personnel, time or resources to go into communities and round up people and do all kinds of mass throwing folks on buses. That’s entirely a figment of folks’ imagination.”

Yet Trump is moving to actually enforce US law, reversing the across-the-board Obama-era slowdown of enforcement actions. Violent criminals remain the top priority, but are no longer the only priority.

Now plea-bargaining a felony down to a misdemeanor won’t leave you automatically exempt from immigration enforcement, nor will DHS officials wink at an illegal immigrants’ fraudulent filing for welfare benefits.

To read more click here. 

Other Stories of Interest

President Trump’s Immigration Plans Remain Murky Despite Rhetoric

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Immigrants nationwide are waiting anxiously to see how President Trump handles immigration enforcement after his rhetoric suggested a hardline approach.

What remains unclear is whether recent raids mark a departure from Obama administration’s policies, Newsday reports. 

President Obama wasn’t exactly weak on immigration. In fact, his administration deported an estimated 2.5 million immigrants, more than his predecessors.

On Feb. 12, Trump tweeted, ““The crackdown on illegal criminals is merely the keeping of my campaign promise. Gang members, drug dealers & others are being removed!”

“The Border Patrol has traditionally picked up people and created a climate of fear for even those who have papers,” Meghan Maloney of the New York Immigration Project told the Buffalo News. “In this current climate, that fear is much more palpable.”

But the conservative National Review suggested last week that the deportation policies so far are “nothing new.”

“Illegal immigrants in the United States have long dealt with the fear that ICE officers would be knocking at their door,” it said. “In fiscal year 2012, for example, ICE removed over 400,000 illegal aliens, a number that was high enough to prompt frenzied anti-deportation rhetoric.”

Washington Post: Trump Administration Uses Fear to Direct Immigration Policy

border patrol 3By Editorial Board
Washington Post

As a candidate, Donald Trump pledged “zero tolerance for criminal aliens,” a stance, stripped of its tough-guy rhetoric, that might not have represented too drastic a departure from President Barack Obama’s prioritization of undocumented felons for deportation. Within days of taking office, however, Mr. Trump issued an executive order that expanded the definition of criminality so broadly as to encompass virtually any undocumented immigrant charged with a crime or even suspected of having broken a law.

In sweeps by immigration agents across the country, the new administration seemed to be making good on Mr. Trump’s threat by arresting more than 600 undocumented immigrants, most of them in metropolitan areas in a dozen or so states. While the actions by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in themselves were not dissimilar to raids undertaken during the Obama administration — which in the 2012 fiscal year alone resulted in the deportation of more than 400,000 people — they unleashed a wave of anxiety in immigrant communities. For good reason, they feel they are in the new president’s crosshairs.

That anxiety was fed by reports, subsequently confirmed by ICE officials, that along with unauthorized immigrants who had committed serious crimes, others were caught in the dragnet if they happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, lacking papers.

In a conference call with reporters, David Marin, a top ICE official in Los Angeles, justified the raids by saying that “dangerous criminals who should be deported are being released into our communities.” At the same time, though, he cast doubt on his own assertion by acknowledging that about 40 of the roughly 160 undocumented immigrants detained by ICE agents in the Los Angeles area had been convicted not of felonies but of misdemeanors — and in a few cases had no criminal convictions at all. It’s anyone’s guess how those 40 count as “dangerous criminals who should be deported.”

To read more click here. 

Nearly 700 Undocumented Immigrants Arrested in Recent Raids

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump’s pledge to remove 2 million to 3 million undocumented immigrants from the U.S. began last week when federal officers arrested more than 680 people living in the country illegally, Reuters reports.  

The  Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids were conducted in at least a dozen states, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said.

Kelly said 75% of the immigrants arrested had criminal records.

Trump praised his administration for having “really done a great job” arresting immigrants.

“We’re actually taking people that are criminals, very, very, hardened criminals in some cases with a tremendous track record of abuse and problems,” Trump said.

Immigrants were targeted in Los Angeles, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, San Antonio and the Midwest. 

Homeland Security Secretary Says He Has No Clue What a Sanctuary City Is

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

What is a sanctuary city?

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly confessed that he had no idea.

“I don’t have a clue,” Kelly told San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman when she asked for a definition.

Kelly was speaking to law enforcement in San Diego.

The definition is important because President Trump signed an executive order that threatened to pull federal funding from every “sanctuary jurisdiction.”

To be sure, what constitutes a sanctuary city has not been made clear. In general, it means cities that refuse to work with federal authorities on immigration enforcement.

Other Stories of Interest

Homeland Security IG to Investigate Trump’s Travel Restrictions

Protest at Wayne State University in Detroit. Photo by Steve Neavling.

Protest at Wayne State University in Detroit. Photo by Steve Neavling.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Office of Inspector General for Homeland Security is investigating the agency’s role in President Trump’s immigration restrictions, CBS News reports. 

The review comes after four federal judges issued stays on Trump’s executive order, which bans travel to the U.S. from seven majority-Muslim countries. Members of Congress also have complained about the constitutionality of the travel restrictions.

Lawyers representing some of the stranded travelers said CBP and DHS workers ignored the judge’s orders.

In a statement, Illinois Senators Tammy Duckworth and Dick Durbin called the executive order “rushed and poorly drafted.”

Other Stories of Interest

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