best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

November 2017
S M T W T F S
« Oct    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: JFK

Records: Jack Ruby Told FBI Informant to ‘Watch the Fireworks’ Hours Before JFK’s Assassination

John F. Kennedy, via White House archives.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Jack Ruby, who would shoot and kill Lee Harvey Oswald, told an FBI informant to “watch the fireworks” just hours before the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, according to newly released JFK files.

The interaction between Ruby and FBI informant Bob Vanderslice wasn’t relayed to the FBI until March 1977, nearly 14 years after Kennedy was shot, the Independent reports

“The informant stated that on the morning of the assassination, Ruby contacted him and asked if he would ‘like to watch the fireworks’,” the FBI record stated.

“He was with Jack Ruby and standing at the corner of the Postal Annex Building facing the Texas School Book Depository Building, at the time of the shooting.

“Immediately after the shooting, Ruby left and headed toward the area of the Dallas Morning News Building, without saying anything to him.”

Ruby died in jail in 1967.

JFK Files Prompt Calls to Publicly Release Files on Civil Rights Killings

Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Tune into 910AM the Superstation at 11 a.m Friday for a discussion on the release of files on civil rights killings. 

The long-awaited release of secret John F. Kennedy assassination files has prompted a push for the FBI to release secret or redacted files on killings during the civil rights era.

Students from Highstown High School in New Jersey lobbied Congress to make the files public.

“This issue is not as prominent within the mainstream media, but it should be,” one of the students, senior Zabir Rahman, told the Clarion Ledger. “The families of the victims of these atrocious crimes deserve justice if they can get it and some measure of closure.” 

The students used the JFK Records Collection Act of 1992 as a model for what they called the “Cold Case Records Collection Act of 2017,” which would create an independent review board to coordinate the release of classified records on civil rights killings.

Many of the killings are detailed in FBI files that remain largely redacted. They include the KKK’s 1964 killing of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner and the 1959 lynching of Mack Charles Parker.

FBI records on the 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. also contain redactions.

Activists also are calling on redacted files relating to the 1965 assassination of Malcolm X.

Civil rights lawyers said the largely secret files make it difficult to solve cold cases.

The measure to release the files was introduced in March by U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush, an Illinois Democrat, and is under consideration by the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee.

So far the bill has received bipartisan support. Also backing the bill is Cynthia Deitle, a former FBI special agent who ran the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Cold Case Division.

“The Civil Rights Cold Case Records Collection Act of 2017 is a crucial piece of legislation that must be passed by Congress and signed by President Trump,” she Deitle in a statement. “We as a society can no longer wait for vital records housed within the FBI to stay within their exclusive control. The federal government needs to release the records to researchers, academics, journalists and others who are devoted to finding the truth as to what happened to thousands of individuals who were murdered as a result of racially-motivated homicides. We have the ability, with passage of this act, to rewrite history and bring justice long delayed.”

Weekend Series on Crime History: Lee Harvey Oswald’s Phone Call Before He Was Killed

Weekend Series on Crime History: JFK’s Secret Service Agents Break Their Silence

Weekend Series on Crime History: Who Was Jack Ruby

Secret Service Agent to Receive Lifetime of Civic Leadership Award After Harrowing Account with JFK’s Assassination

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Although Clint Hill was one of the closest witnesses to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the former Secret Service agent said he would never divulge the harrowing account publicly, especially not in a book, the Marin Independent Journal reports.

Hill, who is now 82 and lives in Tiburon, Calif., said he changed his mind after all of these years when he was assured any book he worked on would not include gossip.

After all, he had quite a compelling story to tell: As Jackie Kennedy’s guard, he is widely known for climbing into the president’s car just after the Nov. 22, 1963, assassination.

Hill, who has written two New York Times best-sellers with co-author Lisa McCubbin, is to receive a Lifetime of Civic Leadership award from the Concord-based JFK University’s Institute of Entrepreneurial Leadership on Friday.

Their most recent book, “Five Days in November,” hit book stores in November.

“I’m glad we did (the books), because it provides information to people that is quite persuasive about what happened that day,” Hill said.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Weekend Series on Crime History: The JFK Assassination

Dallas Morning News: City Will Never Truly Get Beyond Nov. 22, 1963

Dallas Morning News
Editorial

Fifty years is a relative blip on the grand timeline, barely a rounding error between your genesis point and the end of life as we know it. Yet in human terms, 50 years is longer than many life spans, past and present.

In Dallas terms, 50 years is five decades of exploration, examination and grinding introspection about what happened, and why, on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dealey Plaza.

John F. Kennedy’s slaying was a seminal event in our city’s history, encapsulating too much that came before and influencing much that would follow, and here we are. We have considered it, studied it, reflected and grieved.

It’s tempting to acquiesce after all these years, to step away from the pain and sadness and horror of a president’s murder on our streets, and say, finally: “Enough. We are past that now.”

That many of us have obsessed about this single moment for so long says something. Dallas today bears little resemblance to 1963 Dallas. Divisions and demarcations, fading away by the decade, were stark. Today’s politics may have troubling elements, but they are a shallow dive compared with the dangerous extremism then.

To read more click here.