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Tag: jihad

FBI Director: San Bernardino Shooters Did Not Publicly Support Jihad on Social Media

San Bernardino couple who opened fire at a holiday party.

San Bernardino couple who opened fire at a holiday party.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director James B. Comey sought Wednesday to clear up confusion about reports that at least one of the San Bernardino shooters used social media to promote jihad.

Comey said the husband and wife were “showing signs in their communication of their joint commitment to jihad and to martyrdom” in private messages, not publicly posted ones, the Washington Post reports. 

“Those communications are direct, private messages,” Comey said during a news conference here. “So far, in this investigation we have found no evidence of posting on social media by either of them at that period in time and thereafter reflecting their commitment to jihad or to martyrdom. I’ve seensome reporting on that, and that’s a garble.”

Comey’s comments contradict assertions made during the Republican presidential debate Tuesday and a report by the New York Times that one of the shooters “talked openly on social media” about jihad. 

Comey declined to say which social media sites were used to pass on private messages.

FBI Director Comey Says Homegrown Terrorists Pose Urgent Danger But Hard to Track

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director James Comey said it’s impossible to gauge how many Americans are joining Islamic insurgents in Syria but emphasized that the threat is urgent, the Associated Press reports.

Comey said he’s concerned about what he called “lone wolves,” or people who are connecting online with others interested in jihad.

Those people are hard to track, said Comey, who originally estimated about 100 people have made the trip to Syria or at least tried to.

“When I give you the number of more than 100, I can’t tell you with high confidence that’s a 100 of 200, that’s a 100 of 500, that’s a 100 of a 1,000 or more, because it’s so hard to track,” Comey said.

The FBI has made several arrests in connection with terrorism in Syria.

 

FBI: Suburban Denver Woman Planned to Wage Jihad In Middle East

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 19-year-old suburban Denver woman boarded a flight on her way to wage jihad in the Middle East.

But the Associated Press reports that authorities arrested her April 18 at the Denver International Airport, where she told agents she was en route to the Middle East to help start a holy war, according to the FBI.

Shannon Maureen Conley had “legitimate targets of attack” that included military facilities, government employees and public officials, the AP wrote.

Conley was charged with conspiring to help a foreign terrorist organization.

Investigators were told that Conley planned to fly to Turkey before traveling to Syria to become a housewife and nurse at a man’s camp.

FBI: Teen Tried to Detonate What He Thought Was Real Bomb in Chicago in FBI Sting

 
 
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The investigation began with an email message about jihad and ended with a man pressing the trigger on what he believed to be a car bomb outside of a Chicago bar, the Associated Press reports.

On Friday, after months of investigating the 18-year-old U.S. citizen from a Chicago suburb, Adel Daoud was arrested for trying to detonate a phony car bomb, according to the FBI.

Daoud is expected to be charged this afternoon on charges of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction and attempting to damage and destroy a building with an explosive, the AP reported.

It’s not uncommon for undercover FBI agents to befriend would-be terrorists and provide them with fake explosives.

Using the same strategy in 2010, a Lebanese immigrant dropped what he thought was a bomb into a trash bin near Chicago’s Wrigley Field, the AP reported.

STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

 

Physics Grad Pleads Guilty in Model Plane Plot

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Massachusetts man accused of staging a plot to attack the U.S. Capitol Building and the Pentagon with explosive-laden model airplanes pleaded guilty Tuesday to two federal charges, the Christian Science Monitor reports.

Under a plea deal, Rezwan Ferdaus is to serve 17 years in prison and 10 years of supervised release, if the federal judge in Boston signs off, according to the Christian Science Monitor.

Ferdaus is a physics graduate who was arrested in September after undercover FBI agents posed as Al Qaeda operatives and delivered to him explosives and assault rifles.

Ferdaus told authorities he wanted to terrorize the country in the name of jihad, the Christian Science Monitor reported.

Colo. Man Charged With Supporting Overseas Terrorist Group

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI arrested a Colorado man over the weekend at Chicago O’Hare Airport on charges of providing and attempting to provide support to a Pakistani-based terrorism group.

Jamshid Muhtorov, aka Abumumin Turkistony, aka Abu Mumin, 35, of Aurora, Colorado, who is a refugee of Uzbekistant.

Authorities charged that Muhtorov indicated that he planned to travel overseas and fight on behalf of the Islamic Jihad Union (IJU), a designated foreign terrorist organization, based in Pakistan.

Authorities said the IJU, “adheres to an anti-western ideology, opposes secular rule in Uzbekistan and seeks to replace the current regime with a government based on Islamic law. In addition to conducting suicide attacks in Uzbekistan, the IJU has claimed responsibility for numerous attacks against coalition forces in Afghanistan.”

Authorities alleged that Muhtorov had sworn allegiance to the IJU, and that he was ready for any task, even with the risk of dying.

Federal authorities pointed out that the activities of Muhtorov “highlight the continued interest of extremists residing in the United States to join and support overseas terrorists.”

 OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST:

Was FBI’s Disinterest in NY Terror Case an Indicator That It May Have Been Overblown?

Mayor Bloomberg

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Did police, district attorneys and Mayor of New York Michael Bloomberg inflate the importance of a recent terror suspect arrest?  A New York magazine report suggests that was possibility.

Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, Manhattan district attorney Cyrus Vance Jr., and Mayor Bloomberg announced the arrest of Jose Pimentel at a city hall news conference Sunday night. But it turns out that the FBI had turned down requests to take part in the Pimentel investigation, citing some “issues” the agency had with the case.

“But more information on the seriousness of Pimentel’s threat, as suggested by the absence of the FBI in the investigation, could indicate that the arrest was more insignificant than it appeared last night,” New York magazine wrote.

Pimentel had been under investigation for more than two years. Bloomberg told the press the suspect had no connections to outside terror groups and was acting as “a total lone wolf.” Pimentel kept up the website www.trueislam1.com, which posted bomb-making directions from the Al Qaeda magazine Inspire, and had allegedly spoken of his desire to train in Yemen to carry out jihad in New York.

A law enforcement official, according to New York magazine, saw it this way:  “We weren’t going to wait around to figure out what he wanted to do with his bombs. He was in Harlem about an hour from actually having assembled the bombs” at the time of his arrest, but had all the “unassembled components ready to go.”

To read more click here.

FBI Terrorism Sting in Houston Ends in Conviction

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Barry Walter Bojul’s trip to Yemen has been detoured, possibly by as much as 20 years in a federal prison.

The 30-year-old Texan’s  conviction in a Houston federal court on Monday was the culmination of an investigation that began in 2009 by the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force. He was convicted of providing support to al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP).

Bojul acted as his own attorney.

In 2009, law enforcement thwarted three attempts of Bujol’s to leave the US for the Middle East, fearful he was planning to commit a violent jihad. Concerned, FBI agents arranged for Bujol to meet a confidential informant, who posed as  a recruiter for al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.  Bujol later told  the informant he wanted to fight with the mujahideen.

It was established at the trial that Bujol had been in contact with the late Yemeni-American al-Qaeda associate Anwar Al-Aulaqi. In response to Bujol’s questions of how to support jihad, Aulaqi sent a letter entitled “42 Ways of Supporting Jihad,” which advocated violence and killing.

The confidential informant contacted Bujol on May 30, 2010, with a previously agreed upon codeword signaling the beginning of Bujol’s travels to the Middle East to join AQAP. They drove to the Port of Houston together where Bujol thought he was boarding a ship as a stow-away bound for training in Algeria then fighting in Yemen.

“Minutes after stowing away in a room on board the ship, agents took him into custody without incident,” according to a U.S. Attorney’s Office press release.

Bujol faces up to 15 years for attempting to provide material support to a designated terrorist organization and another five years for identity theft charges related to a fake ID Bujol had made to gain access to the port. He also faces fines of up to $250,000.

He has been in federal custody since the May 30, 2010 arrest, where he will remain until sentencing.