best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2017
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: journalism

Trump Lawyer Asks Reporter If She’s on Drugs for Asking about Trump’s Termination Letter to Comey

James Comey testifies about President Trump before a Senate committee.

James Comey testifies about President Trump before a Senate committee.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

White House special counsel Ty Cobb questioned whether a reporter was on drugs for asking why the president didn’t send his letter notifying James Comey that he was being fired as FBI director.

The unprofessional question came in an email exchange between Cobb and Business Insider’s Natasha Bertrand, who wrote a story about how the letter may be used as evidence in the obstruction of justice case against President Trump. 

Cobb declined to say why the letter was never sent to Comey and asked Bertrand, “Are you on drugs?”

Bertrand shared the exchange on Twitter.

“Cobb supposedly has a great reputation and is a very respected lawyer,” Bertrand told HuffPost. “He was brought in to bring some discipline to the whole operation. So I wasn’t expecting that response to what I thought was a pretty basic question.” 

FBI Director Refuses to Say “Never” When It Comes to Agents Impersonating Reporters

FBI Director James Comey

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

FBI Director James Comey said he’s unwilling to pledge an end to agents posing as reporters, but emphasized that such a tactic should be rare and “done carefully with significant supervision, if it’s going to be done,” the Seattle Times reports.

The comments at a round-table discussion with reporters came after recent revelations that an FBI agent posed as an Associated Press reporter in 2007 to investigate high school bomb threats.

The AP asked that the tactic stop.

“I’m not willing to say never,” Comey responded. “Just as I wouldn’t say that we would never pose as an educator or a doctor or, I don’t know, a rocket scientist.”

The AP argues that posing as a reporter degrades a news agency’s “legacy of objectivity, truth, accuracy and integrity.”

Comey said that he’s not familiar with any other instances in which agents posed as reporters.

“I think it’s something that ought to be done carefully with significant supervision if it’s going to be done,” he said. “But I’m not in a position to say never.”

 

FBI Abruptly Changes Course on Hiring Company to Grade Positivity of News

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has ended its controversial quest to hire a company to grade whether news is positive, neutral or negative, the Washington Times reports.

The bureau abruptly removed the contract solicitation without explanation, and the FBI declined to discuss it.

Journalism ethicists expressed worries about the FBI’s plans to grade news coverage.

“You would certainly worry this could affect access,” Dan Kennedy, a journalism professor for Northeastern University, said. “It might affect the way they’re going to approach your questions, whether they’re going to be extra careful not to make news if you’re on the ‘bad list.’”

Now the FBI is looking for a clipping service but not a grading system.

Partner of Journalist Responsible for Reporting on NSA Leaks Was Held at London Airport

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

David Miranda, the partner of the journalist who exposed the NSA’s surveillance program through records from Edward Snowden, found himself detained at a London airport for nine hours, The New York Daily News reports.

Miranda lives in Brazil with journalist Glenn Greewald, whose reports on NSA surveillance has stirred controversy around the globe.

Miranda was at Heathrow Airport returning from meeting one of Greenwald’s collaborators when he was held for nine hours under a terrorism law, the Daily News reported.

Greenwald called the detainment “a failed attempt at intimidation.”

“It’s bad enough to prosecute and imprison sources,” he said,” It’s worse still to imprison journalists who report the truth. But to start detaining the family members and loved ones of journalists is simply despotic.”

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Reporter: Why Did FBI Target Me If Justice Department Not Going After Reporters?

By James Ball
The Guardian

Would you trust a politician if your liberty depended on it?
Day to day, it’s something journalists in America are having to do, whether they’re aware of it or not. The politician in question is Attorney General Eric Holder, and the key quote in question is his vow to Congress: “As long as I’m attorney general, (the Justice Department) will not prosecute any reporter for doing his or her job.”

That memo doesn’t quite seem to have filtered down to federal agencies, if a recent report to Slate is to be believed. Ryan Gallagher, one of the site’s security writers, has produced a long account of the strange tale of Sigurdur Thordarson, who became a WikiLeaks insider as just 17 years old, who then preceded to voluntarily turn FBI informant.

To read more click here.

Journalist Awarded Nearly $500,000 for FBI’s Failure to Turn Over Public Records

 Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Journalist and author Seth Rosenfeld spent a lot of time and money digging up FBI records since the mid-1980s, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

The FBI’s refusal to turn over records turned out to be costly after a judge ruled last week that the bureau owed Rosenfeld nearly a half million dollars in attorney fees for violating the Freedom of Information Act in 1990 and 2007.

Rosenfeld, a tough critic of the bureau, was seeking records on the FBI’s covert operations at the University of California Berkeley and its odd relationship with President Ronald Reagan.

Rosenfeld recently published his book, “Subversives: The FBI’s War on Student Radicals and Reagan’s Rise to Power.”

The FBI said it had planned to turn over the information but was slow in doing so, the Chronicle reported.

STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

FBI Probe of News Leaks Chills Relations with Media

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Media coverage of national security issues has become more difficult because employees at federal agencies have been afraid to speak out since the FBI began its hunt for leakers of sensitive information, the New York Times reports.

In one of the most thorough criminal investigations of intelligence disclosures in years, agents are questioning employees about leaks at the White House, the Pentagon, the CIA and the National Security Agency.

Under President Obama’s administration, a record six leaks have been prosecuted.

“People are being cautious,” one intelligence official who, considering the circumstances, told the New York Times on condition of anonymity. “We’re not doing some of the routine things we usually do,” he added, referring to briefings on American security efforts and subjects in the news.

OTHER NEWS OF INTEREST