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Tag: jury deliberations

‘Whitey’ Bulger Trial Enters Fourth Day After Judge Urges Jurors to Reach Verdict on All Counts

 

Whitey Bulger/fbi

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Jurors in the trial of James “Whitey” Bulger entered the fourth day of deliberations today after a judge urged them Thursday to try to reach a verdict on each of the racketeering counts, the Boston Globe reports.

“You have a duty to attempt to reach agreement on each of the racketeering acts . . . if you can do so conscientiously,” Judge Casper told jurors.

That’s a tall task for jurors considering a 32-count indictment that includes murder, the Globe reported.

One of Bulger’s attorneys, J.W. Carney, Jr., said he’s happy to see thoughtful deliberations.

“All Americans can be proud of this jury,” he said. “They have taken their constitutional role with great seriousness and are clearly looking closely at the evidence, evaluating the credibility of witnesses, and applying the instructions given to them by Judge Casper.”

 

No Verdict in ‘Whitey’ Bulger Case During Second Day of Deliberations

Whitey Bulger/fbi

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A federal jury will resume deliberations today in the racketeering and murder trial of accused mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger after submitting five questions for the judge, CNN reports.

The eight men and four women wanted to know whether they needed to vote unanimously on 33 “predicate” acts in one of the federal racketeering charges.

To be sure, there are a lot of charges to peruse. Bulger, 83, is charged with racketeering, murder, money laundering and 13 counts of extortion.

Murder, Racketeering Trial of ‘Whitey’ Bulger Begins Second Day of Deliberations

 

Whitey Bulger/fbi

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Jurors in the murder and racketeering trial of suspected mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger will deliberate for the second day after both sides delivered their closing remarks Monday, the Boston Globe reports.

Bulger is charged with participating in 19 murders and wreaking havoc in Boston as the former leader of the Winter Hill Gang. He faces dozens of charges.

Deliberations ended for the day Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. and are expected to pick back up this morning.

Families of the victims didn’t stray far from the courtroom so they don’t miss the verdict being read.

“I feel relaxed, at ease with it, that it’s at the end and we’re here,” Steve Davis, whose 26-year-old sister Debra Davis was allegedly strangled by Bulger in 1981, told the Globe. “But it’s going to be nail-biting, jaw-crunching stress waiting for them to come back and wondering what they’re going to come back with.”

Deliberations Reach Second Day in Discrimination Suit Involving Missing Arm

Justin Slaby

 
Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Jurors may decide as early as today whether Army Ranger Justin Slaby, who had his arm blown off, was unfairly denied a job with the FBI because of his prosthetic arm, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Deliberations of the eight-person jury began Tuesday.

Slaby, 30, says he was fired after the FBI discovered he had a prosthetic arm.

In the trial, the FBI’s attorneys contended Slaby’s prosthetic arm was a hindrance.

Slaby said he performed well on the tests and was unfairly discriminated against.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST


Jury Deliberation Drags on in John Edwards Trial

Shoshanna Utchenik
ticklethewire.com

Jury deliberation drags on for an 8th day in ex-presidential hopeful John Edwards’ corruption case.

The jury must decide whether $925,000 in gifts, used to cover up Edwards’ extramarital affair with Rielle Hunter, was merely social capital, or illegal campaign contributions… and they must decide whether Edwards understood them as such.

The jury has been deliberating since May 18, sifting through 17 days of testimony from 31 witnesses, reports the L.A. Times. However much of the testimony in this high-profile case was less lurid than Edwards’ affair and focused on forensic examinations of bank transactions, and scrutiny of campaign finance laws.

The former vice-presidential candidate and presidential hopeful could face a maximum of 30 years in prison and $1.5 million in fines if convicted on all six counts against him. But these high stakes are not ruling the mood in the court, which doesn’t seem to be in any hurry.

As graduation season arrives, many of the jurors have been allowed to wag the dog as U.S. District Judge Catherine Eagle adapted the deliberation schedule to their family calendars.

Reporters have not come up with any theories regarding an apparent fashion statement: the four alternate jurors all wore yellow on Thursday, red on Friday, and on Tuesday, they wore gray and black.

But decoding that secret message ought to kill some time as the bored spectators wait for a verdict.

To read more click here.