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Tag: malicious software

FBI’s Search for ‘Mo,’ Suspect in Bomb Threats, Highlights Use of Malware for Surveillance


By Craig Timberg and Ellen Nakashima
Washington Post Staff Writers

WASHINGTON –– The man who called himself “Mo” had dark hair, a foreign accent and — if the pictures he e-mailed to federal investigators could be believed — an Iranian military uniform. When he made a series of threats to detonate bombs at universities and airports across a wide swath of the United States last year, police had to scramble every time.

Mo remained elusive for months, communicating via ­e-mail, video chat and an ­Internet-based phone service without revealing his true identity or location, court documents show. So with no house to search or telephone to tap, investigators turned to a new kind of surveillance tool delivered over the Internet.

The FBI’s elite hacker team designed a piece of malicious software that was to be delivered secretly when Mo signed on to his Yahoo e-mail account, from any computer anywhere in the world, according to the documents. The goal of the software was to gather a range of information — Web sites he had visited and indicators of the location of the computer — that would allow investigators to find Mo and tie him to the bomb threats.

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Former College Student on FBI’s ‘Most Wanted’ List for Spying on Suspected Cheating Lovers

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

For just $89, a former San Diego college student has been selling malicious software that spies on suspected cheating lovers.

Although Carlos Enrique Perez-Melara likely didn’t make a lot of money, he was one of five people recently added to the FBI’s list of most wanted cyber-criminals, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

According to the FBI, Perez-Melara would send an electronic greeting card via email to the subjects of his surveillance. Once the card was opened, the software would begin capturing emails and instant messages, the AP explained.