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Tag: medical

Border Patrol Agents Credited with Saving Life of Car Crash Victim

Via Border Patrol

Via Border Patrol

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Border Patrol agents are being credited with saving the life of a driver involved in a rollover accident in south Texas.

Breitbart reports that agents working out of the Falfurrias Border Patrol state in Brooks County were called to the scene of a rollover accident.

Agents arrived to find a driver near a burning, badly damaged car. The driver had serious injuries, including to his head and neck.

Before medics arrived, agents provided emergency assistance to the injured man.

“The Border Patrol is a valuable resource to our community,” Brooks County Sheriff-elect Benny Martinez told Breitbart Texas in an interview on Tuesday. “We are a very poor County financially. Their extra manpower and their saturation throughout the county can mean the difference between life and death to people in some of the remote areas of the county. Because of the number of agents working in our county and their distribution throughout the county, Border Patrol agents are often the first to respond in an event like this. Their training, expertise, equipment, and manpower are an invaluable asset to our community.”

DEA Says Decision on Reclassification of Marijuana Could Be Soon

Photo by Steve Neavling.

Photo by Steve Neavling.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA may be close to reaching a decision on rescheduling marijuana to recognize the medical benefits.

The DEA spokesman Russ Baer said no determination has been made yet on rescheduling pot, but the process is in the “final stages” of an eight-factor evaluating process, High Times reports. 

“I can’t give you a time frame as to when we may announce a decision,” Baer said. “We’re closer than we were a month ago. It’s a very deliberate process.”

High Times wrote:

All of the wild-eyed hope for a marijuana reschedule really heated up this year when the DEA fired off a letter to Senator Elizabeth Warren in April, suggesting that the agency’s plan was to make a rescheduling announcement “in the first half of 2016.” Of course, confusion surrounding the implications of the DEA’s agenda quickly produced a number of ridiculous reports implying that marijuana was soon to be made legal in every state across the nation. This is far from true.

As it stands, marijuana is classified a Schedule I, dangerous drug under the confines of the Controlled Substances Act. In the eyes of the federal government, this means that anything derived from the cannabis plant has no medicinal value and a high potential for abuse. But a schedule downgrade would make some modest changes to Uncle Sam’s hammer-fisted attitude toward the herb—opening up the plant to be considered as having some worth in the scope of modern medicine.

Lawmakers Try to Protect Medical Marijuana Users from Zealous DEA

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA’s defiant crusade against marijuana users may cost the agency a lot of money.

Federal lawmakers are considering several proposals that would severally limit the DEA’s ability to arrest marijuana users, the LA Weekly reports. 

One bill would protect hemp growers and sellers, and another would extend a law  designed last year to protect marijuana users in states where medical marijuana is legal.

Other proposals include trimming millions of dollars from the DEA’s hemp eradication program.

Bill Piper, director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance, saod “there’s unprecedented support on both sides of the aisle for ending the federal war on marijuana.”

Police: Ex-FBI Director Louis Freeh Likely Fell Asleep Before Serious Car Crash

Louis Freeh

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Before his car drifted across the road and crashed last week, former FBI Director Louis Freeh likely fell asleep and won’t be cited.

ABC News reports that Freeh can’t recall why his car crashed in Barnard, VT.

Investigators said they won’t know for sure what caused the accident, but evidence points to him falling asleep. Drugs and alcohol were not a factor, investigators said.

No brake or swerve marks were spotted on the road.

Freeh, 64, was seriously injured in the crash and was airlifted to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire.

The hospital declined to release his condition Wednesday.

Parker: Strongest Medical Evidence Yet of the Harm from Marijuana Legalization

Ross Parker

 
Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office.
 
By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

The evidence continues to mount of the dangerous health risks of today’s potent forms of marijuana, especially to segments of the population such as juveniles and young adults. But the medical evidence seems to be having little effect in view of a combination of denial, lack of political will, and ignorance on the part of state legislators and the public in general, as well as the well organized and financed forces of legalization.

Last week The New England Journal of Medicine, probably the most respected medical journal in the United States, reported in an article entitled, “Adverse Effects of Marijuana Use,” by four physicians and researchers that there is a substantial level of scientific confidence that the drug can result in addiction, memory and cognitive function damage, impairment of motor function, and long lasting negative changes in brain function. Their conclusion was that increased availability from legalization will significantly increase the negative health consequences to the population.

As shown in other studies, short term use makes it difficult to learn and retain information. Driving skills are impaired. Risky behavior and even paranoia and psychosis can result. Long term use can alter brain development, encourages dropping out of school, a lower IQ during adolescence, reduced satisfaction and achievement, chronic bronchitis, and an increased risk of schizophrenia.

Although the study advises that there can be other factors involved in these devastating results, the link between marijuana and social factors such as lower income, more public assistance, unemployment, criminal behavior, and a lower life satisfaction has been established by several studies. People who used the drug before driving were from 2 to 7 times as likely to be responsible for an accident than those who had not used alcohol or marijuana.

The increase in the average potency of THC content continues to increase, from 3% in the 1980s to 12% in 2012. As the cultivation continues to become more sophisticated in states like Colorado and California, one could expect this figure to increase significantly and, correspondingly, to increase the extent of the adverse effects on increasing numbers of people in the population. Increased emergency room visits (100 % increase from 2004 to 2011) and reports to poison control centers (three times the number in legalization states) forcefully demonstrate that this phenomenon is well under way.

Importantly, this steep increase in the THC content also calls into question the validity of all of those studies done in previous decades. The assurances of those early studies, on which pro-legalization forces rely so heavily to assuage the reluctance of state legislators, are worth little in the face of these statistics and the recent medical studies.

The article reports that there is evidence that marijuana or other cannabinoids may benefit symptoms associated with certain clinical conditions such as glaucoma, nausea, inflammatory diseases, MS, and epilepsy. However, more research is necessary to confirm these findings, as well as to determine the most effective form of administration.

Since medical marijuana prescriptions issued to adults are a major source of recreational use by juveniles, states must develop an effective method of regulation, as well as education about the dangers of both inadvertent and commercial distribution for non-medical use. Anyone who reviews medical marijuana advertisements or talks to law enforcement officers about the level of therapeutics of many of such clinics, can only question whether the drug legalization is actually accomplishing a fraction of the benefits touted by its advocates.

Recently, I walked around Venice and Santa Monica beaches in southern California. The number and appearances of the “medical” marijuana clinics in the narrow streets leading to the beaches were strikingly non-medical to everyone I was with. The medical purpose of such businesses seemed like a joke. A local federal agent confirmed that the great majority of the large amounts dispensed were universally known to be used recreationally and were so ubiquitous as to be unenforceable. The genie was out of the bottle.

Twenty-two states have legalized marijuana use in some form or another. One can only hope that other states will pause in this trend and consider the mounting medical evidence of significant health and well being problems in so many different categories. Perhaps studies in the 22 states will demonstrate that the cost of these policies is so great as to demand reconsideration.