best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

May 2017
S M T W T F S
« Apr    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: New England

FBI Director Meets with Local Law Enforcement at Ribbon-Cutting for New Boston Office

FBI Director James Comey

FBI Director James Comey

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director James Comey met with about 40 local law enforcement leaders over lunch Tuesday before participating in a ribbon-cutting to announce the opening of a new headquarters for the FBI’s Boston field office in Chelsea.

The office, which covers Massachusetts, Main, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, sits on 5.1 acres and will be 220,000 square feet, eight stories and cost $100,000 to build.

Although Comey didn’t field questions from reporters, Harold Shaw, special agent in charge of the FBI office in Boston, said the director talked about drug trafficking, terrorism and gang violence. Comey sought to build a working relationship with other law enforcement agencies, the Boston Globe reports. 

“They were very insightful, the discussions about what’s concerning them most,” said Shaw.

Chelsea Police Chief Brian Kyes, who is head of the Massachusetts Major City Chiefs of Police Association, said he’s encouraged by the enhanced level of partnership between the FBI and local police.

“The FBI has been incredibly supportive of local police in terms of these issues as they pertain to gang violence, drugs, bank robberies, white collar crime and certainly terrorism,” Kyes said.

DEA Identifies Where Mexican Cartels Are Operating in the U.S.

Map of cartels identified by the DEA.

Map of cartels identified by the DEA.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA identified Mexican cartels that operate within the United States and provided a map to show where the drug gangs are wielding influence.

In Texas, for example, the DEA has identified the following cartels operating within the state: the Sinaloa, Gulf, Juarez, the Knights Templar, Beltran-Levya, Jalisco and the Zetas.

But Texas is far from alone. Most states have links to cartels, which can be very violent and supply dangerous drugs.

The areas with the highest concentration of cartel involvement are California, Texas, New York and New England.

Other Stories of Interest

FBI Recovered Remains of Mob Victim Steven DiSarro After 23 Years of Searching

Stephen DiSarro

Stephen DiSarro

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has recovered the human remains of South Boston nightclub owner and mob victim Steven A. DiSarro, who has been missing since 1993.

The Boston Herald reports that his body was found buried in the rear of a building Providence on March 31.

The FBI confirmed this week that the remains belonged to DiSarro, who reportedly owed money to the mob before he went missing. He was 43 at the time.

“We’d like to express our sincere thanks and appreciation for all the efforts that went into locating Steven,” DiSarro’s wife, Pamela, said in 
an FBI’s press release. “We look forward to the conclusion of the FBI’s investigation so we can learn as much as possible about what really happened to Steven and finally get some closure for our family.”

It’s unclear who killed DiSarro. Several mobsters have accused each other of the murder.

Strongest Medical Evidence Yet of the Harm from Marijuana Legalization

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

The evidence continues to mount of the dangerous health risks of today’s potent forms of marijuana, especially to segments of the population such as juveniles and young adults. But the medical evidence seems to be having little effect in view of a combination of denial, lack of political will, and ignorance on the part of state legislators and the public in general, as well as the well organized and financed forces of legalization.

Last week The New England Journal of Medicine, probably the most respected medical journal in the United States, reported in an article entitled, “Adverse Effects of Marijuana Use,” by four physicians and researchers that there is a substantial level of scientific confidence that the drug can result in addiction, memory and cognitive function damage, impairment of motor function, and long lasting negative changes in brain function. Their conclusion was that increased availability from legalization will significantly increase the negative health consequences to the population.

As shown in other studies, short term use makes it difficult to learn and retain information. Driving skills are impaired. Risky behavior and even paranoia and psychosis can result. Long term use can alter brain development, encourages dropping out of school, a lower IQ during adolescence, reduced satisfaction and achievement, chronic bronchitis, and an increased risk of schizophrenia.

Although the study advises that there can be other factors involved in these devastating results, the link between marijuana and social factors such as lower income, more public assistance, unemployment, criminal behavior, and a lower life satisfaction has been established by several studies. People who used the drug before driving were from 2 to 7 times as likely to be responsible for an accident than those who had not used alcohol or marijuana.

The increase in the average potency of THC content continues to increase, from 3% in the 1980s to 12% in 2012. As the cultivation continues to become more sophisticated in states like Colorado and California, one could expect this figure to increase significantly and, correspondingly, to increase the extent of the adverse effects on increasing numbers of people in the population. Increased emergency room visits (100 % increase from 2004 to 2011) and reports to poison control centers (three times the number in legalization states) forcefully demonstrate that this phenomenon is well under way.

Importantly, this steep increase in the THC content also calls into question the validity of all of those studies done in previous decades. The assurances of those early studies, on which pro-legalization forces rely so heavily to assuage the reluctance of state legislators, are worth little in the face of these statistics and the recent medical studies.

The article reports that there is evidence that marijuana or other cannabinoids may benefit symptoms associated with certain clinical conditions such as glaucoma, nausea, inflammatory diseases, MS, and epilepsy. However, more research is necessary to confirm these findings, as well as to determine the most effective form of administration.

Since medical marijuana prescriptions issued to adults are a major source of recreational use by juveniles, states must develop an effective method of regulation, as well as education about the dangers of both inadvertent and commercial distribution for non-medical use. Anyone who reviews medical marijuana advertisements or talks to law enforcement officers about the level of therapeutics of many of such clinics, can only question whether the drug legalization is actually accomplishing a fraction of the benefits touted by its advocates.

Recently, I walked around Venice and Santa Monica beaches in southern California. The number and appearances of the “medical” marijuana clinics in the narrow streets leading to the beaches were strikingly non-medical to everyone I was with. The medical purpose of such businesses seemed like a joke. A local federal agent confirmed that the great majority of the large amounts dispensed were universally known to be used recreationally and were so ubiquitous as to be unenforceable. The genie was out of the bottle.

Twenty-two states have legalized marijuana use in some form or another. One can only hope that other states will pause in this trend and consider the mounting medical evidence of significant health and well being problems in so many different categories. Perhaps studies in the 22 states will demonstrate that the cost of these policies is so great as to demand reconsideration.

 

Mobster Gets 9 Years for Shaking Down Strip Clubs

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A high-ranking mobster in New England was sentenced Wednesday to nine years in prison for his role in shaking down strip clubs for money in return for protection, according to the Department of Justice.

U.S. District Court Judge William Smith also ordered Edward “Eddy” Lato, 65, of Providence, R.I., to three years of supervised release after completing his prison sentence.

In July, Lato admitted to participating in a racketeering and extortion conspiracy that demanded between $800,000 and $1.5 million in so-called protection payments from adult entertainment businesses in Rhode Island from 1995 to 2009, the Justice Department said.

Secret Service Looking Into “Black Money” Scam in New England

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Paper money has often been cited as one of the dirtiest materials we touch every day. But if someone offers to wash it for you, kindly decline.

Authorities in Providence, R.I. last week arrested two Liberian nationals in an expanding “black money” scheme that has already cost three New Englanders $170,000, reports the Associated Press. The Secret Service is now looking into the scam.

The con artists seek out victims at night clubs and other locations, looking for people that seem to be well-off. They tell victims that they have real currency died black to avoid detection by customs officials when forced from their countries, according to the AP, and cannot afford the chemical mix needed to wash the bills back to normal. They will demonstrate the cleaning process with a few bills as a trap, a process that one agent said is very convincing.

“If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is,” said Thomas M. Powers, U.S. Secret Service Resident Agent in Charge in Providence, according to AP.

Victims will withdraw money and follow the criminals to a hotel, where the money is to be washed in a solution of chlorine, ammonia and laundry detergent mixed in a bathtub. The mix gives off a smell so powerful that the victim is usually overcome to the point that they leave the criminals alone with the money. Then the victims and criminals leave the room for a meal, and the criminals hand over the room and safe keys to the victim. When the victims return to the safe they are left with stacks of black construction paper.

Powers told the AP the scam is taking place mostly in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and investigators believe their are 20 scammers involved, and additional victims that may be too embarrassed to come forward. They believe the scam to be spreading out across New England, and while authorities aren’t sure how the money is spent, there is no evidence of violence or connections to terrorism.

To read more click here.

FBI Agents Nab New England Mobster in Idaho After 17 Years on the Lam

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

After changing his name and being on the lam for 17 years, the FBI on Monday nabbed suspected New England mobster Enrico Ponzo in Idaho, the Boston Herald reported.

The paper reported that Ponzo, 42, — suspected of being part of New England’s Patriarca Family –faces a host of charges including racketeering, firearms offenses and conspiracy to murder.

The paper reported that he is expected to appear in U.S. District Court in Idaho on Wednesday where prosecutors will move to ship him back to Boston to face a 40-count indictment.  He was arrested in the town of Marsing in southwestern Idaho.

The FBI alleged that he was involved in multiple murder attempts including a botched one on crime boss “Cadillac” Frank Salemme in 1989, the paper reported.

To read more click here.

New England Mobster Who Tried Bribing Undercover FBI Agent to Get 6 Years

boston

In mob circles, he was known as the “The Cheese Man”. In mob circles and in law enforcement circles, he was known as a big cheese; he was the underboss of the New England mob.

By Shelley Murphy
Boston Globe
BOSTON — Reputed New England Mafia underboss Carmen “The Cheese Man” DiNunzio has cut a plea deal with state and federal authorities that will send him to prison for six years for bribery, extortion, and illegal gambling, according to his lawyer.

The 51-year-old DiNunzio is expected to plead guilty this afternoon in US District Court in Boston to charges that he tried to bribe an undercover FBI agent posing as a corrupt highway inspector in fall 2006 in a bid to secure a $6 million contract to provide loam, a soil mix, to the Big Dig.

As part of a sweeping plea deal, he is scheduled to appear in Essex Superior Court in Salem next Wednesday and plead guilty to state charges of extorting bookmakers and running an illegal gambling business in 2001.

For Full Story

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST