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Tag: occupy wall street

Judge Orders FBI, CIA, NSA to Disclose Spying on Occupy Protesters

fbigunbadgeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A federal judge has ordered the FBI, CIA and NSA to disclose any evidence that they spied on Occupy Philly protesters.

U.S. District Judge Berle Schiller gave the agencies 60 days to comply with the order, Al Jazeera reports. 

Civil rights activists want to know whether the agencies spied on protesters who camped outside Philadelphia City Hall for seven weeks in 2011.

“The government should not be investigating its citizens simply because they’ve raised their voices in dissent, whether it’s against government or corporate policy,” civil rights lawyer Paul Hetznecker said Tuesday.

The right-to-know case follows the revelation that the FBI was monitoring Occupy Wall Street rallies in New York and other cities.

Homeland Security Spied on Occupy Wall Street Protests in about a Dozen U.S. Cities

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A division of the Department of Homeland Security spied and kept records on the Occupy Wall Street protests, even when they were peaceful the Huffington Post reports.

More than 250 records obtained by the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund show the federal government was keeping close tabs on protesters.

“Taken together, the two sets of documents paint a disturbing picture of federal law enforcement agencies using their vast power in a systematic effort to surveil and disrupt peaceful demonstrations,” Mara Verheyden-Hilliard, executive director of the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, said in a statement. “The federal agencies’ actions were not because Occupy represented a ‘terrorist threat’ or a ‘criminal threat,’ but rather because it posed a significant grassroots political challenge to the status quo.”

The department was watching demonstrations in Philadelphia, New York City, Chicago, Denver, Boston, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis and Tampa, Fla.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

FBI Was Monitoring Occupy Wall Street Before Protests Began in New York City

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

FBI agents were monitoring the Occupy Wall Street movement before the first protesters set up camp in Zuccotti Park in New York City, the New York Daily News reports, citing new documents.

Records show the FBI tipped off officials about potential protests at the New York Stock Exchange, Federal Hall and the Museum of American Finance, the Daily News wrote.

One of the tips came as early as Aug. 19, 2011, about a month before the movement began.

Investigations continued nationwide as the movement spread, the Daily News reported.

The heavily redacted documents show the FBI overreached its legal bounds, the head of the civil-rights group, Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, said.

“(It’s) a window into the nationwide scope of the FBI’s surveillance, monitoring, and reporting on peaceful protestors organizing with the Occupy movement,” Mara Verheyden-Hilliard, the partnership’s executive director told the Daily News.

STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

 

Smoke Bomb Lands on White House Lawn

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Occupy protestors in Washington, D.C., drew the Secret Service out after throwing a smoke bomb on the White House lawn, reports KSTC-TV.

U.S. Secret Service spokesman George Ogilvie says there were no arrests made when agents dispersed the crowd on Tuesday night. Still, the White House was on lock down, as people inside were prevented from leaving out of the Pennsylvania Avenue side.

Barack and Michelle Obama were away from the White House celebrating the first lady’s 48th birthday at a nearby restaurant when the smoke bomb was thrown.

Ogilvie says the protest swelled to between 1,000 and 1,500 people at one point.

To read more click here.

 

A Secretive Nixon Said the Wealthy Better Equipped for Ambassadorships

white house photo

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Assuredly the  Occupy Wall Street folks would find President Nixon’s grand jury testimony of interest.

In newly released documents of President Richard Nixon’s 1974 grand jury testimony, the president admitted to giving precedence to wealthy campaign contributors when assigning foreign ambassador posts.

The president maintained that such assignations were not “commitments” made for contributions. Rather, the president reasoned that big contributors, who are generally wealthy, have justified their qualifications by the mere fact of their wealth.

“Certainly, no sale of ambassadorship should be made,” he told investigators, “but, on the other hand, the fact that an individual has proved himself on the American scene, has proved himself by legitimately building a great fortune, rather than being a disqualifier should be a factor that can be considered and should be considered in determining whether he should get a position.”

Much of the questioning surrounded whether or not an explicit agreement of a “commitment” had been made between among Nixon and his advisors, trading ambassadorships for campaign contributions.

Nixon later stated that he gave “top consideration to major financial contributors mainly for the reason that big contributors in many instances make better ambassadors, particularly where American economic interests are involved.” Still, at times it seems hard to draw the line of distinction.

Regarding another appointed ambassador, Nixon stated, “Pearl Mesta wasn’t sent to Luxembourg because she had big bosoms. Pearl Mesta went to Luxembourg because she made a good contribution.”

In Nixon’s opening statements to the grand jury he expressed the “vital necessity of confidentiality in presidential communications,” saying that information he may reveal to the grand jury, if circulated in the press and among the American public, could hurt American interests.

He cited reports then in newspapers of past presidents okaying assassinations, saying such disclosures, though probably untrue, were not in the public interest. “This is the reason why I have resisted in the courts … attempts to impinge upon the privileged status of such conversations,” he said. Only with absolute guarantee of no disclosure, Nixon told investigators in his opening remarks, “I will reveal for the first time information … which, if it is made public, will be terribly damaging to the United States.”

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Occupy Wall Street Snitch is Partner in Private Security Firm with Busted Secret Service Agent

By Jeff Stein
Spy Talk

WASHINGTON –A business partner of the self-appointed spy who stole hundreds of Occupy Wall Street emails last month and posted them online was convicted of using excessive force as a Secret Service agent, court records show, and sentenced to six months incarceration in a halfway house.

Kevin Schatzle lists himself as one of two managing partners at Provide Security, a private intelligence and security firm with a Web site but no physical address. His co-managing partner is Thomas Ryan, who last month infiltrated OWS and pilfered protesters’ e-mails and social network postings, which he claimed showed the movement’s plans for violence.

Provide Security boasts that its “associates are handpicked from the ranks of highly trained and experienced former agents of the US Secret Service, members of U.S. Special Forces, Global Intelligence Agencies and other premier law enforcement organizations.”

To read full story click here.

 

Retired ATF Executive Comments on Occupy Wall Street and the Police

James Cavanaugh was an ATF agent and supervisor for 33 years before retiring in 2010.
 

James Cavanaugh/atf photo

 
By James Cavanaugh
For ticklethewire.com

America is now witnessing a democratic movement that is taking to the streets the likes of which we have not seen since 1968. As this phenomenon develops we should all realize how overwhelmingly peaceful these gatherings have been.

Think about spontaneous gatherings across the nation where citizens choose to gather based on their constitutional rights to peacefully assemble and to air their grievances. We talk much in America about constitutional rights. We wave pocket constitutions and we all profess to revere the Constitution.

Nevertheless, that requires that we recognize the Constitution when it is in action. It is not always pretty and it is not always totally organized, it does not always speak with one voice, it is not always the model of organization or civility, but therein lies the essence of its absolute brilliance. So thousands gather across many cities forming ad hoc mini democratic societies in which they try to clean up the area, cook food, provide places for soapbox speeches, carry signs and verbalize their frustrations.

Naturally this is a disruption to the status quo of the area. Most of these venues are public gathering places or public parks. Places that should be the most natural gathering places for citizens to air their grievances.

So the gathering is logical, and it’s constitutionally protected. In America we can have these gatherings without tanks or troops, and we should have them without fear of death or injury. No one who is criticized by the protesters will be sacrosanct: Not bankers nor politicians, not the media nor the mayors, not corporations nor fat cat hedge fund leaders, and certainly not the police.

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