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Tag: Rahm Emanuel

Chicago Tribune: Trump Must Abandon ‘Immigration Stunt’ Against Sanctuary Cities

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel took Chicago’s legitimate defense of the sanctuary city concept to court Monday, challenging the Trump administration’s effort to compel Chicago cops to cooperate with the feds on immigration investigations.

This fight has been building since President Donald Trump took office, issuing intemperate warnings of “bad hombres” and drawing excitable connections that do not exist between immigrant populations and crime problems in Chicago and elsewhere.

We’d like to think that the sooner the sanctuary city sideshow is cast aside by the courts, the sooner Congress might take up the substantive issue of immigration reform, which would bring millions of people out of the shadows. But we’re not in the business of handicapping the courts, or Congress. All we can do is hope logic prevails, and the Trump administration is forced to abandon this immigration stunt because it’s not a recipe for making Chicago safer.

The city’s lawsuit, filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Chicago, challenges the Justice Department‘s attempt to, in effect, deputize the Chicago Police Department as part-time U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents. Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants police to identify and hold onto anyone they come across who appears to be in the country without permission, until ICE can investigate. When we say Sessions “wants” Chicago’s help, actually he’d be requiring cooperation in exchange for financial assistance. Unless the city agrees, the Justice Department says it will withhold federal grant money that can be used for a broad array of local crime prevention programs.

That money comes from the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program, a longstanding federal initiative created by Congress to support law enforcement. Chicago has used annual Byrne money for things like new police vehicles and community policing outreach. This year the city plans to apply for $3.2 million, but the Trump administration has changed the rules. To get the money, the Justice Department will now require the city to share information on the immigration status of arrestees and hold those people for 48 hours to give immigration officials a chance to intervene. As part of the new arrangement, the feds would be given unlimited access to local police stations and other law enforcement facilities for interrogation.

To read more click here.

Chicago Tribune: Time Has Come for Justice Department to Investigate Chicago PD

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Chicago Tribune
Editorial Board

The appointment of a blue-ribbon task force to probe the Chicago Police Department is a laudable move by Mayor Rahm Emanuel. It became an unavoidable step amid mounting pressure a week after the city was forced to release the video depicting the alleged execution of Laquan McDonald, a troubled black 17-year-old shot 16 times by a white Chicago police officer in October 2014.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, a former head of the Justice Department‘s Civil Rights Division, will serve as an adviser to the newly formed police accountability panel. But why turn to a former head of the Civil Rights Division? What is needed is a full-scale Justice Department “pattern-and-practice” investigation of civil rights abuses within the Chicago Police Department — the type of sweeping, outside investigation that Chicago, seemingly alone among large American cities, has mysteriously evaded over the last several decades.

From Newark to New York, Cleveland, Miami, New Orleans, Albuquerque and Los Angeles, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, which exercises sole authority to launch and conduct such inquiries, has scoured dozens of large police departments, leaving Chicago’s omission head-scratching.

The Justice Department may act if it finds a pattern or practice by a local law enforcement agency that systemically violates people’s rights. These investigations have resulted in settlements and court orders requiring increased transparency and data collection, steps to prevent discriminatory policing, independent oversight, improved investigation and review of uses of force, and more effective training and supervision of officers — all measures that the Chicago Police Department urgently needs.

Why now? In the last 10 years, Chicago has paid an astounding sum, more than $500 million, to settle police misconduct cases, including $5 million to the mother of Laquan McDonald before a lawsuit was even filed. These settlements include, but are not by any means exclusive to, the reign of terror under a white police detective and commander, Jon Burge, and his midnight crew who tortured dozens, possibly hundreds, of African-American suspects in the 1970s and 1980s.

Chicago Mayor Bluntly Denounces State AG’s Call for Civil Rights Investigation into PD

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel fired back Wednesday at Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s request for the Justice Department to launch a civil rights investigation into the police department.

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that the mayor called the request “misguided,” even as protesters demanded justice for several unarmed people killed or shot by Chicago police officers.

Emanuel noted there are numerous investigations by city and federal authorities into the death of Laquan McDonald, who was fatally shot by police in October 2014, resulting in murder charges against Police Officer Jason Van Dyke.

“Like everybody else, I await their conclusions. They are looking into this situation and all the aspects around it. An additional layer prior to the completion of this, in my view, would be misguided,” Emanuel said in a live, online interview conducted by Politico before an audience at the Willis Tower.

“They are doing a thorough job. Hitting the re-start button on a whole new investigation does not get you to the conclusion in an expedited fashion.”

Prosecution Expected to Rest in Blago Retrial: Blago May Testify

Ex-Gov on NBC's Celebrity Apprentice

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Well, that was quick.

After just 2 1/2 weeks of testimony, the prosecution in the federal retrial of ex-Gov. Rod Blagojevich is expected to rest its case on Thursday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

The first trial took 11 weeks, most of which was taken up by the prosecution presenting it case centering on bribery allegations and Blago’s alleged attempt to sell the Senate seat vacated by President Obama.

Speculation continued this week as to whether the  ever-chatty Blago will testify on his own behalf, the Sun-Timengs reported.  He did not testify in the first trial in which the jury convicted him on only 1 of 24 counts, and that was for lying to the FBI.

The defense has indicated it might also call as witnesses Jesse Jackson Jr. and newly minted Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

To read more click here.

Is it End of the Line for Ex-FBI Agent Jody Weis as Head of Chicago Police?

Chief Johy Weis/police photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Could it be the end of the line for ex-FBI agent Jody Weis, the first outsider to head up the Chicago Police Department in nearly 50 years?

The Chicago Tribune reports that his three-year, $310,000 a year contract as police chief expires on Tuesday, and Mayor-elect Rahm Emanuel had pledged to replace him.

“We’ll see what happens,” Weis said during a news conference on Sunday, according to the Trib.

“When this position ends, I’ll look into doing something else. I’d like to do something here in Chicago,” he said. The former FBI agent was appointed by Mayor Richard Daley in 2008.

U.S. Atty. Fitzgerald Called Rahm Emanuel in 2008 the Day Gov. Blago Was Arrested

Rahm Emanuel

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

It’s nice to get a courtesy call from time to time.

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that’s just what Rahm Emanuel got from Chicago’s U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald the morning that Ill. Gov. Rod Blagojevich was arrested in Dec. 9, 2008. Emanuel had been selected as President-elect Obama’s chief of staff.

Sun-Times reporter Natasha Korecki reported that Fitzgerald wanted Emanuel to know his name was expected to show up in a criminal complaint filed against the governor.

Patrick Fitzgerald/doj photo

“Members of the U.S. attorney’s office called a series of people to let them know an arrest had been made,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Reid Schar told the Sun-Times.

Emanuel was never accused of wrongdoing.

Blago Attys Claim FBI Tape of Rahm Emanuel Missing

Ex-Gov on NBC's Celebrity Apprentice

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

He’s back.

Ex-Ill. Gov. Rod Blagojevich — a man who never saw a microphone he didn’t like — has filed a pretrial motion seeking what he says is missing evidence including records of a phone call between  Blagojevich aide John Harris and then White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel, the Associated Press reported.

Blagojevich is set to face a second trial in Chicago  on public corruption charges April 20. The first one ended in an embarrassment for prosecutors who got a conviction on only one of 24 counts — lying to an FBI agent. The jury deadlocked on the rest.

AP reports that the motion claims the missing telephone conversation took place just a day before Blagojevich’s December 2008 arrest.

AP reported that the motion says the conversation could help the defense.

To read more click here.

Feds Bust 2 Hackers for Stealing Emails from AT&T’s iPad Data Base; Some Famous Names Included

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

With the most modern of technology comes the most modern of crimes.

Two men — one from Arkansas and another from California — were arrested Tuesday and charged in Newark, N.J.  with hacking into the AT&T’s servers and stealing emails and personal info of about 120,000 Apple iPad users including such notables as Diane Sawyer, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Harvey Weinstein and Rahm Emanuel.

The thievery happened between June 5 and June 9, authorities said.

Andrew Auernheimer, 25, of Fayetteville, Ark., and Daniel Spitler, 26, of San Francisco were arrested by the FBI and charged with an alleged conspiracy to hack AT&T’s servers and for possession of personal subscriber information obtained from the servers.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said that immediately after the Immediately following the theft, the hackers provided the stolen e-mail addresses and ICC-IDs (Circuit Card Identifiers) to the website Gawker, which published the stolen information in redacted form.

The article said the breach “exposed the most exclusive email list on the planet,”and indicated that iPad users were vulnerable to spam marketing and malicious hacking, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

Mayor Bloomberg

U.S. Attorney Fishman stated: “Hacking is not a competitive sport, and security breaches are not a game,” said Newark U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman.

“Companies that are hacked can suffer significant losses, and their customers made vulnerable to other crimes, privacy violations, and unwanted contact.” Computer intrusions and the spread of malicious code are a threat to national security, corporate security, and personal security.”